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Author Topic: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?  (Read 27503 times)

Offline Ian33

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #25 on: 10/01/2006 00:00:34 »
The Moon is pulling away from the Earth because the force of gravity exerted by the Earth is slowly diminshing. This is due the slowing of the earth's rotation. All in all, it's a very slow process, but when the earth was spinning faster, the Moon was much closer.

And, you should also realise that the Earth's core is cooling, albeit again very slowly. At some point in time, there will be no subduction zones, no fluid zones. Result, no Magnetic fields. Whichever way you cut it, the Planet is doomed and all life forms with it.

Ian

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Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #26 on: 10/01/2006 00:24:23 »
quote:
The Moon is pulling away from the Earth because the force of gravity exerted by the Earth is slowly diminshing. This is due the slowing of the earth's rotation. All in all, it's a very slow process, but when the earth was spinning faster, the Moon was much closer.



Not quite Ian

Its to do with energy transference
The moon is moving away from the earth not because the earth gravitational force is diminishing but because the moon is gaining energy by robbing it from the earth through tidal friction. And the energy that its robbing is the earths rotational energy which is why the spin of the earth is slowing.

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
« Last Edit: 10/01/2006 17:41:29 by ukmicky »
 

Offline Ian33

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #27 on: 12/01/2006 19:08:02 »
Interesting, I'll look into that further. At least we are all agreed that the Moon is slipping away from the Earth.


Cheers

Ian

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Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #28 on: 12/01/2006 19:34:11 »
It will stop though and interestingly tidal friction is also the reason why we always see the same face of the moon, just like how the moon is slowing the rotation of the earth, the earth has also slowed the rotatation of the moon,so it now revolves only once for every orbit of the earth.

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
« Last Edit: 12/01/2006 19:38:46 by ukmicky »
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #29 on: 12/01/2006 21:14:41 »
If the Earth's core is cooling, how come it ain't cooled yet????? More to the point, how come the core's molten constituents are spued out of volcanoes and hot water bubbles out of the rocks?

You are off your frigging nut if you believe this garbage. Come on, umpteen billion billion billion billion years old and it aint half hot mum.

"The explanation requiring the fewest assumptions is most likely to be correct."
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Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #30 on: 13/01/2006 00:27:46 »
Yes the earth core is cooling and its mainly only the size of the earth and its position in relation to the sun which has prevented it from going the way of mars

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
« Last Edit: 13/01/2006 01:14:09 by ukmicky »
 

another_someone

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #31 on: 13/01/2006 01:23:37 »
quote:
Originally posted by ukmicky

Yes the earth core is cooling and its mainly only the size of the earth and its position in relation to the sun which has prevented it from going the way of mars

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    



Mars is now believed to have a liquid, or partially liquid core.

http://www.aig.asn.au/mars_core.htm
quote:

New information about what is inside Mars shows the Red Planet has a molten liquid-iron core, confirming the interior of the planet has some similarity to Earth and Venus.
Researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Pasadena, Calif., analyzing three years of radio tracking data from the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft, concluded Mars has not cooled to a completely solid iron core; rather its interior is made up of either a completely liquid iron core or a liquid outer core with a solid inner core. Their results are published in the March 7, 2003, online issue of the journal Science.
"Earth has an outer liquid-iron core and solid inner core. This may be the case for Mars as well," said Dr. Charles Yoder, a planetary scientist at JPL and lead author on the paper. "Mars is influenced by the gravitational pull of the sun. This causes a solid body tide with a bulge toward and away from the sun (similar in concept to the tides on Earth). However, for Mars this bulge is much smaller, less than one centimeter. By measuring this bulge in the Mars gravity field we can determine how flexible Mars is. The size of the measured tide is large enough to indicate the core of Mars can not be solid iron but must be at least partially liquid," he explained.
The team used Doppler tracking of a radio signal emitted by the Global Surveyor spacecraft to determine the precise orbit of the spacecraft around Mars. "The tidal bulge is a very small but detectable force on the spacecraft. It causes a drift in the tilt of the spacecraft's orbit around Mars of one-thousandth of a degree over a month," said Dr. Alex Konopliv, a planetary scientist at JPL and co-author on the paper.
The researchers combined information from Mars Pathfinder on the Mars precession with the Global Surveyor tidal detection to draw conclusions about the Mars core, according to Dr. Bill Folkner, another co-author on the paper at JPL.
The precession is the slow motion of the spin-pole of Mars as it moves along a cone in space (similar to a spinning top). For Mars it takes 170,000 years to complete one revolution. The precession rate indicates how much the mass of Mars is concentrated toward the center. A faster precession rate indicates a larger dense core compared to a slower precession rate.
In addition to detection of a liquid core for Mars, the results indicate the size of the core is about one-half the size of the planet, as is the case for Earth and Venus, and the core has a significant fraction of a lighter element such as sulfur.


« Last Edit: 13/01/2006 01:24:42 by another_someone »
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #32 on: 13/01/2006 01:49:40 »
HI ANOTHER_SOMEONE

I've read that before somewhere.

but in the end the core of mars is still getting colder and is well on its way to cooling off totally compared to the earth which will stay hot for much longer due to the size of the body.

PS you need a name. a person type name . doesn't matter what it is, don't even have to be yours ,you can call yourself dick if you wish, but you still need a name , so sort it out mate. maybe we can have a competition to give another_someone a name

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
 

another_someone

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #33 on: 13/01/2006 01:50:04 »
quote:
Originally posted by Andrew K Fletcher

If the Earth's core is cooling, how come it ain't cooled yet????? More to the point, how come the core's molten constituents are spued out of volcanoes and hot water bubbles out of the rocks?

You are off your frigging nut if you believe this garbage. Come on, umpteen billion billion billion billion years old and it aint half hot mum.



Firstly, the Earth is only about 4 billion years old.

It also has thick insulating layers over the core, namely the magma and a thing crust.

There are also additional heat being created within the core by radioactive decay.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geothermal_%28geology%29
quote:

The planet's internal heat was originally generated during its accretion, due to gravitational binding energy, and since then additional heat has continued to be generated by the radioactive decay of elements such as uranium, thorium, and potassium. The heat flow from the interior to the surface is only 1/20,000 as great as the energy received from the Sun.



 

another_someone

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #34 on: 13/01/2006 01:55:33 »
quote:
Originally posted by ukmicky

HI ANOTHER_SOMEONE



PS you need a name. a person type name . doesn't matter what it is, don't even have to be yours ,you can call yourself dick if you wish, but you still need a name , so sort it out mate. maybe we can have a competition to give another_someone a name

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    



Since I have subsequently linked my web site to my profile, I have somewhat uncloaked my anonymity.
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #35 on: 13/01/2006 01:59:05 »
Hello George nice to meet ya, damn shame your still faceless though:D

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
« Last Edit: 13/01/2006 02:00:56 by ukmicky »
 

Offline Solvay_1927

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #36 on: 14/01/2006 02:03:23 »
AT LAST - you have a name!  Hi George.
 

another_someone

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #37 on: 14/01/2006 03:25:13 »
quote:
Originally posted by Solvay_1927

AT LAST - you have a name!  Hi George.




Well, I actually had a name a long time ago.

Hello Paul. Hello Micky.

In fact, Neil had spotted my web site some while back.  I know I've had about a dozen people from here look at the site.

George.
« Last Edit: 14/01/2006 03:26:33 by another_someone »
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #38 on: 14/01/2006 03:55:21 »
I must admit i did do a search a while back and came across it, but didn't say anything in case you wished to remain anonymous.

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
« Last Edit: 14/01/2006 03:55:47 by ukmicky »
 

another_someone

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #39 on: 14/01/2006 07:10:08 »
quote:
Originally posted by ukmicky

I must admit i did do a search a while back and came across it, but didn't say anything in case you wished to remain anonymous.

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    



It would seem a bit perverse to attach a link to my web site, knowing full well that my name is on the site, and still expect anonymity.

When I first joined up, I did not have the link to the web site, for that reason.  What did surprise me was that my e-mail address was effectively published on here (i.e. the mail link used the clients mail reader, and hence showed the mail address it was sending to, rather than using web mail and hiding the mail address it was sending to).
 

Offline Ian33

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #40 on: 16/01/2006 22:32:31 »
How very rude Fletcher. It may of escaped your notice, but Volcanic activity is very low compared with the much earlier epochs. The massive outpourings from the Deccan traps occured around 65 million years ago. There has been alot of activity since, but not on that scale. I suggest you are talking rubbish. The earth's core is thought to be solid iron, around which the various fluid zones move, hence magnetic fields.
That the Earth is cooling is factual.
Ian

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Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #41 on: 17/01/2006 00:04:23 »
The wonders of google

George, the thing is when i googled your name (another_someone)it was before you placed your website link in your profile. And somehow don't ask me how google came up with your site. At the time i wasn't sure if it was definitely you. So i decided not to say anything,and also in case you wished to remain anonymous.



Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
« Last Edit: 17/01/2006 04:33:38 by ukmicky »
 

Offline Leif

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #42 on: 19/01/2006 01:51:20 »
The Earth is gaining mass in negligible amounts through small bits of debris falling into it, and the occasional large chunk like the one that is thought to have wiped out the dinosours (except some that evolved into birds, but that's another topic).  We may be loosing gas to space, but we'd be gaining gas from space too.  We also loose a teensy weensie bit to spacecraft and wayward ammo that we humans shoot out.  I'm not sure if volcanos can shoot rocks out at escape velocity, but none of the outgo can compare to all the income.  The Earth was formed out of falling debris, so in an earlier solar system there were more smaller objects colliding with each other, then a steady shower on the bigger objects, and finally the occasional falling star like we see today.  Jupiter gained more than a little mass a few years back when a commet flew into it, there are great pictures of that!  Jupiter and the sun are so huge that they are like solar system vacuum cleaners which protect us from most of the crap flying around out there, but we still get some.

Plate tectonics have nothing to do with this gain of mass at this point.  The very fast rising of the Earth's temperature due to people adding carbon to the atmosphere which traps heat does increase the size of the Earth's crust but not its mass, and that can and probably does lead to increased tectonic and volcanic activity which also adds greenhouse gasses in a positive feedback until the Earth's atmosphere stabalises again at a new higher temperature.  

Photons are believed to carry no mass, so we don't get mass from light from the sun.  While this has never been proven, it has been proven that any mass gain would be next to nothing.  If it is indeed zero, then light may only reach out and touch us and the mass of it remains in the sun, which would be weird.  Having said that, the "solar wind" is full of particle rubbish which might add a tiny bit of mass to the Earth, but from what I understand our magnetic field deflects most of it somehow.

The Earth's core would have cooled down if it weren't for all the fisionable material deep down there somewhere.  The supplied diagram of the Earth in cross section is fanciful, nobody know what's there and there's rife speculation about it. [}:)] But nuclear fission is the only reasonable explaination for all that great geothermal potential, that aided and abetted slightly by squashing and squishing of the Earth by our very large moon (for the size of our planet).

Here's the one to get you all going...  gravity is not magic, it's well documented effect is caused by the fact that time goes slower where there's less space.  The only place there's less space is where there's some matter displacing it, either by its density or by its motion (covering a distance).  Where time goes slower it is easier for matter to exist because an electron (for instance) has more time to complete its orbit reletive to where time goes faster.  So the time speed gradient that surrounds denser matter, from slower at the core to faster out in space, is the slide that things fall down.  Nuclear processes at the Earth's core happen at the same speed as anywhere, except the speed of time is going slower there relative to here so from our perspective the nuclear fision down there is in slow motion.  This is true even more in the sun, which much denser than the Earth and has a much more extreme time speed gradient (or "gravitational field" in dull old inaccurate talk).   The strongest time speed gradients are around the purest bits of matter which displace the most space relative to their size, namely black holes and sub-atomic particles, which make both fascinating to study.  There is no evidence that space is curved, which is a wing-nut half-explaination of gravity - space in the entire observable universe is as flat as a pancake.  It is well documented that time runs at a slower speed at sea level than on mountain tops and in accellerated objects - GPS systems need to take that into account to be accurate.  Its not a big difference, unless you try to lift something heavy or climb a mountain!  Even very small differences in the speed of time have a huge impact on matter because there is incredible amounts of energy in matter, that's why things fall so well.

Here's the forcast.  The moon is in a somewhat unstable orbit and though it may be going a few cm this way or that, it would eventually fall into the Earth if the sun wasn't growing so fast that it will swallow us both up long before then.  We're talking billions of Earth years, so don't panic.  Or, if you're going to panic, panic about real environmental destruction and overpopulation, evil presidents and war-mongering, prejudice and killer germs, etc. which are much more immediate threats.
 

Offline Leif

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #43 on: 19/01/2006 01:53:56 »
I just registered and spent 2 hours writing a reply, then was told that I'd done something wrong and had to go back, and now my post has vanished.  Un register me from this crappy time eating forum!
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #44 on: 19/01/2006 02:19:55 »
quote:
LIEF
just registered and spent 2 hours writing a reply, then was told that I'd done something wrong and had to go back, and now my post has vanished. Un register me from this crappy time eating forum!


Sorry to hear of your loss,maybe you didnt enter anything in the subject box at the top. Hopefully you wont give up with this forum so soon and i hope you try again.

However i also have to say, their is something very basic which most people learn when they get their first pc.   SAVE OFTEN. :)

Next time Try writting your post in word and when your finished copy and paste it into the reply window.

Michael                 HAPPY NEW YEAR                    
« Last Edit: 19/01/2006 02:20:45 by ukmicky »
 

ROBERT

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #45 on: 26/01/2006 11:07:11 »
On a BBC TV programme I saw recently it was said that "30,000 tonnes" of meteors fall to Earth each year.

However this site says "10,000 tonnes".

""Meteorites on the Earth
It is estimated that about 10,000 tons of meteor material enter the Earth's atmosphere every year. The very small meteors (size less than about one tenth of a millimeter, or 1/250 of an inch) descend slowly, at a few cm/sec or about 1 inch/second. Medium-size meteors (size between 0.1 mm and a few centimeters, or between 1/250 of an inch and 1 inch) burn up completely in the atmosphere. Bigger meteors burn up partially but part(s) of them do reach the surface of the Earth.""
http://www.sunspot.noao.edu/sunspot/pr/answerbook/meteoroids.html#q118

My estimate of atmospheric gas loss is 50,000 tonnes per year, (based on an article in "Science"),
 so an meteor gain of 10,000 - 30,000 tonnes per year would mean that Earth is losing mass.

(However the error margins on these figures are large).
« Last Edit: 26/01/2006 11:30:37 by ROBERT »
 

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Re: Is the Earth gaining or losing mass ?
« Reply #45 on: 26/01/2006 11:07:11 »

 

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