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Author Topic: Where does the beta particle come from?  (Read 6368 times)

Offline lunar11

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« on: 30/04/2010 21:56:54 »
Hi.
I know that beta-minus decay involves a neutron converting to an electron (beta) and an anti-electron-neutrino; in fact a down quark becomes an up quark and the W‾ boson provides momentum/energy to the beta and the anti-neutrino, but, how does the electron and anti-neutrino originate?; they were not inside the neutron.

Thanks


 

Offline lightarrow

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« Reply #1 on: 30/04/2010 22:56:34 »
Hi.
I know that beta-minus decay involves a neutron converting to an electron (beta) and an anti-electron-neutrino; in fact a down quark becomes an up quark and the W‾ boson provides momentum/energy to the beta and the anti-neutrino, but, how does the electron and anti-neutrino originate?; they were not inside the neutron.
It's not so simple. Think for example of gamma rays converting in a couple electron/positron: these two were not inside the gamma ray.
The Standard Model is a more complex theory than that (people have to study years of physics at university...)
 

Offline lunar11

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« Reply #2 on: 02/05/2010 23:18:03 »
I have studied physics at university. Someone must know or is it one of those questions that is not answerable as yet?
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« Reply #3 on: 02/05/2010 23:37:41 »
THis is an important fact that is not often stressed.  The fact that particle interactions can produce anything (subject to the fundamental conservation laws) shows that at the most fundamental level everything originates from the same elementary component.  that is "energy"
 

Offline Murchie85

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« Reply #4 on: 03/05/2010 10:13:45 »
Just out of curiosity isn't beta-minus the rarest of decay?
 

Offline lunar11

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« Reply #5 on: 03/05/2010 11:40:09 »
No.
Beta-minus is a common decay, which is a electron originating from the nucleus.
You may be thinking of beta-plus decay, which is the emission of a positron (positive electron)
 

Offline lightarrow

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« Reply #6 on: 03/05/2010 19:13:19 »
I have studied physics at university. Someone must know or is it one of those questions that is not answerable as yet?
The second you wrote (for what I know).
 

Offline Murchie85

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« Reply #7 on: 04/05/2010 00:55:26 »
Thanks Lunar, that was the one!
 

Offline yor_on

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« Reply #8 on: 10/05/2010 06:21:19 »
Yeah, it should have to do with the energy of that neutron shouldn't it? What it seems to say is that a neutron then must be able to create those two just by decaying?

And as far as I know decaying involves no transfer of energy from anything inside Planck time, if I now assume virtual particles to be outside of that. So either a neutron then have the 'energy' in itself to transform or you will have too look at it as some interaction with 'virtuality'?

You could possibly consider particles some sort of disturbances in a field, but that gives me a headache :) But if you do, then what they change into is not so much an expression by themselves only but of the fields 'disturbance' changing character.

That one was really nice :)
 

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Where does the beta particle come from?
« Reply #8 on: 10/05/2010 06:21:19 »

 

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