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Author Topic: Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?  (Read 3402 times)

Allan Scahill

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Allan Scahill  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hi; I hear on various U.S. media, references to Victorian or Edwardian when speaking about periods in U.S. history.

Why is this when these are British points in time? You would think there would be other relevant periods in American history that the citizens of that country would more easily recognize. 

Allan Scahill
Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada.

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 03/06/2010 00:36:22 by chris »


 

Offline chris

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #1 on: 03/06/2010 00:36:48 »
It's just because we're such trend setters over here...
 

Offline tommya300

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #2 on: 03/06/2010 05:58:15 »
It is easier to refer to ones Country's relatives past familiar similarities...
Best reading of Sherlock Homes, to James Bond 007, (where "007" is a related measurement of a fine cut diamond"), Scotland Yard the best investigated forces, to Jack the ripper etc...
Cycling to relative view points. I was the best of times it was the worst of times...
In the WW2 the British with the prudent look, stiff upper lips, had the best warriors, stubborn hard core best in anything they endeavored. If military needed to get from point A to B if there was UK group side by side, you were guarantied to get Through B non stop to Z... earning the phrase "Bloody Brits", Marine style.
« Last Edit: 03/06/2010 06:04:43 by tommya300 »
 

Offline tommya300

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #3 on: 03/06/2010 09:04:16 »
.
Trying to find some idea to your reference question, I stumbled on this greatest major worldly reference. Metaphorically speaking of reference, it is a hand me down relationship, that usually associated to the prior holder to the last stand point in line.

USA Media Associates deal with the English language and translates it to an almost cockney form sometimes.

"Encyclopædia Britannica is an encyclopedia written in the English language.

 In 1994 the New York Times ([1],[2]) described it as '...the nation's [America's] oldest and most prestigious reference work'. Its articles are commonly considered accurate, reliable and well-written.

A product of the Scottish enlightenment, it was originally published in Edinburgh by Adam and Charles Black beginning in the 18th century. Unlike the French Encyclopédie, Britannica was an extremely conservative publication. Later editions were usually dedicated to the reigning monarch. The publication moved from Scotland to London and became associated with The Times newspaper in the 1870's for its ninth and tenth editions. For the eleventh edition the publication became associated with Cambridge University. The trademark and publication rights were sold after the 11th edition to Sears Roebuck * and it moved to Chicago where it has remained. The current publisher is Encyclopædia Britannica Inc. (properly spelt with æ, the ae-ligature), which now owns a trademark on the word "Britannica"."

*"Sears Roebuck" the early USA form of departmental store chain, established by mail order cataloging...

http://www.knowledgerush.com/kr/encyclopedia/Britannica/

So having an era dubbed after the British points in time is recognized.
"Nowadays" a cockney Rhyming slang, can be the root reason that America has been for years bastardizing the real elite English language*
The trends are inherent, history is also, Britain's history is the Earlier American history, setting a trend
The history that occured on American soil also had occured earlier in British soil. World Wars the British experienced a worst disaster that trampled through, a catastraphy not like the concentrated disaster of 911, but it was spread out over the British country side. Ironic accretion, hey brothers?
.e.g....
*"(pip pip and Cheerio's for breakfast, is one)."

« Last Edit: 03/06/2010 11:21:23 by tommya300 »
 

Offline LeeE

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #4 on: 03/06/2010 16:58:49 »
I suspect it's because monarchial periods tend to be long enough for changes to occur, whereas if the US were to use presidential periods they'd be limited to durations of eight years at most.
 

Offline tommya300

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #5 on: 03/06/2010 17:51:48 »
I suspect it's because monarchial periods tend to be long enough for changes to occur, whereas if the US were to use presidential periods they'd be limited to durations of eight years at most.
And just think it is all repeating no body learned at all from history
Monarchical period 5th 6th century? Way back,to too far back enough, that any earlier civilization media can use it for a gauged...
I think the media rather look at the Elite with class and style, instead of the portrate of Post Stone age versions...
« Last Edit: 03/06/2010 18:01:43 by tommya300 »
 

Offline JP

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #6 on: 04/06/2010 02:07:35 »
I'm not sure the American media does use the British monarchial time periods all that often.  I can't say I've heard reference to the Edwardian period in the US.  Victorian America has a specific meaning, referring to a time when the US was stable and prosperous and started to mimic a lot of Victorian British customs.
 

Offline tommya300

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #7 on: 04/06/2010 02:36:27 »
I'm not sure the American media does use the British monarchial time periods all that often.  I can't say I've heard reference to the Edwardian period in the US.  Victorian America has a specific meaning, referring to a time when the US was stable and prosperous and started to mimic a lot of Victorian British customs.

You know JP I think I heard mostly, as a reference phrase, dubbed the "British Invasion." What point in US history was that, in reference to what British era?

 

Offline Geezer

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #8 on: 04/06/2010 02:49:57 »
JP old bean,

Speaking as someone who has a foot in all three camps (yes - I actually do have three feet), by which I mean Scotland, the UK, and the USA, I think it's a bit more complicated than that.

Despite the American War of Independence and the ethnic composition of the USA, it seems that, for a great many people in the USA, the UK monarchy remains the surrogate monarchy of the USA. A quick look at the popular media in the USA will confirm that.

I suspect language has a lot to do with it.
 

Offline RD

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #9 on: 04/06/2010 03:07:51 »
UK monarchy remains the surrogate monarchy of the USA.

Y'all can have Fergie if you want ... http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/jun/02/sarah-ferguson-on-oprah-duchess-debts-tv
 

Offline Geezer

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #10 on: 04/06/2010 03:22:58 »
UK monarchy remains the surrogate monarchy of the USA.

Y'all can have Fergie if you want ... http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/jun/02/sarah-ferguson-on-oprah-duchess-debts-tv

Ooooooh no! Not on your Nellie!
 

Offline tommya300

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #11 on: 04/06/2010 09:34:32 »
http://www.princess-diana.com/diana/married.htm

http://www.britishroyalwedding.com/royal-weddings/prince-andrew-sarah-ferguson/

Royals set a fine example of trend setting ideas, leaves many scratching their head,
Is this the trend for a throw away society
« Last Edit: 04/06/2010 11:00:10 by tommya300 »
 

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Why do Americans use British monarchal time periods?
« Reply #11 on: 04/06/2010 09:34:32 »

 

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