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Author Topic: How does sunscreen protect our skin?  (Read 2580 times)

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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How does sunscreen protect our skin?
« on: 13/06/2010 04:28:03 »
In the first 6 days of June (2010) we have gotten 3 times the record amount of rain for the entire month of June, here in northern Oregon. But today the sky turned a very strange light blue color and this shiny warm thing appeared in the sky. Got me to thinking about a question I've wondered about for a long time: How does sunscreen work? There is no physical barrier block sunlight hitting the skin, yet I know it works.

  I once took a quite dark skinned friend skiing. I told him he ought to put on some sunscreen. He laughed at me, saying he was black and didn't need it. Well by the end of the day he looked a little red. I told him he looked sunburned but again he reminded me he was black. The next day he was in quite a lot of pain, he even had blisters!!! I wasn't burned at all even though we had spent the same amount of time out in the sun.

  Also can creams protect from other types of radiation as well? Can radiation damage be repaired?


 

Offline Bored chemist

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How does sunscreen protect our skin?
« Reply #1 on: 13/06/2010 21:07:14 »
"There is no physical barrier block sunlight hitting the skin"
Oh yes there is- a very thin one.
 

Offline chris

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How does sunscreen protect our skin?
« Reply #2 on: 19/06/2010 11:18:53 »
 

Offline gbc89

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How does sunscreen protect our skin?
« Reply #3 on: 20/06/2010 22:56:35 »
simply put, it contains substances with the ability to absorb the 'color' UV-light. (UV=ultra violette)
a mirror reflects about all colors, black absorbs all that's why it's a warmer color than other colors and actually isn't a color since your eyes won't receive any reflected light from it, thus non-colored.
for example the color red only reflects the color red if the all-colored sunlight falls onto it, other colors get absorbed.

UV-light is actually a color too, only one which we can't see but is there, and can be treated like one. (a black-light lamp!)
so specific substances can absorb or reflect them.

radiation damage from UV often damages the Thymine's, creating double bonds between those located next to eachother, making it unable to read the DNA at that point.
that's often resulting into cell self-destruction. (it'll message to your body that he's needed to be destroyed)
if that mix of genes is damaged with the part of how many times it can duplicate until it dies it'll turn into an uncontrollable multiplying cell, known as cancer.
 

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How does sunscreen protect our skin?
« Reply #3 on: 20/06/2010 22:56:35 »

 

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