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Author Topic: CELL HYDROPHOBICITY: A MISSED ROLE FOR PROTEINS  (Read 4259 times)

Offline Vladimir Matveev

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CELL HYDROPHOBICITY: A MISSED ROLE FOR PROTEINS
« on: 09/01/2006 06:20:20 »
CELL HYDROPHOBICITY: A MISSED ROLE FOR PROTEINS

For a long time, and up to the present, the term hydrophobicity was mostly has been associated chiefly with lipids. The well-known Meyer-Overton rule was always a strong argument in favor of the lipid nature of biomembranes and of the membrane theory of anesthesia. Until the 1960s, to be "hydrophobic" was synonymous with being "lipid", and the hydrophobic properties of the cell were explained by the presence of its lipid membranes, first of all, and primarily the plasma membrane. Indeed, based on these concepts, numerous "lipid" theories of anesthesia were put forward.

However, in the 1960s, when studying thermodynamic characteristics of the thermodynamics of protein folding and unfolding, Brandts (3) was the first to prove convincingly that during the folding of a protein molecule, hydrophobic areas are formed internally which are inaccessible to water. Initially the thermodynamics of conformational transitions in proteins was the subject of study by a small group of specialists. However, with time, it has become evident that hydrophobic areas within cells are represented not only by lipids, as this was thought for more than 70 years, but also by proteins. The importance of this reappraisal is emphasized by the fact that, after water, protein is the most abundant of all other constituents, comprising up to 65% of the dry mass of cells, and greatly exceeds the total amount of lipid. What I propose here is that the volume of the hydrophobic protein phase can greatly exceed that of the hydrophobic lipid phase. However, I also recognize that the full significance of this observation has not been understood and seemingly not accepted by contemporary cell physiologists in terms of paradigms and working hypotheses.

This theme is continued in the article: Vladimir Matveev. Protoreaction of Protoplasm. Cell. Mol. Biol. 51(8): 715-723, 2005.

See full text here:
newbielink:http://www.actomyosin.spb.ru/protoreaction.htm [nonactive]

New type of protein-protein interaction:
newbielink:http://www.actomyosin.spb.ru [nonactive]


 

Offline Vladimir Matveev

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Re: CELL HYDROPHOBICITY: A MISSED ROLE FOR PROTEINS
« Reply #1 on: 13/03/2006 07:39:57 »
The opposite view on Overton's rule:

Al-Awqati Q.
One hundred years of membrane permeability: does Overton still rule?
Nat Cell Biol. 1999 Dec;1(8):E201-2.  

Abstract. The Overton Rule states that entry of any molecule into a cell is governed by its lipid solubility. Overton's studies led to the hypothesis that cell membranes are composed of lipid domains, which mediate transport of lipophilic molecules, and protein 'pores', which transport hydrophilic molecules. Recent studies, however, have shown that hydrophobic molecules are also transported by families of transporter proteins.

Vladimir Matveev's comment: Today it is known 2-3 millions of organic compounds. 200,000 - 500,000 compounds at least are hydrophobic. Does it mean that a cell has a specific carrier for each hydrophobic organic molecule? Maybe tomorrow some new hydrophobic molecules will be synthesized but a specific carrier already waits it to conduct it through membrane into a cell (?). It is interesting story, isn't that so?

New type of protein-protein interaction:
newbielink:http://www.actomyosin.spb.ru [nonactive]
 

Offline Vladimir Matveev

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CELL HYDROPHOBICITY: A MISSED ROLE FOR PROTEINS
« Reply #2 on: 28/07/2010 06:23:26 »
Some ideas described in "Protoreaction of Protoplasm" were developed in my recent article, "Native aggregation as a cause of origin of temporary cellular structures needed for all forms of cellular activity, signaling and transformations".

Abstract
According to the hypothesis explored in this paper, native aggregation is genetically controlled (programmed) reversible aggregation that occurs when interacting proteins form new temporary structures through highly specific interactions. It is assumed that Anfinsen's dogma may be extended to protein aggregation: composition and amino acid sequence determine not only the secondary and tertiary structure of single protein, but also the structure of protein aggregates (associates). Cell function is considered as a transition between two states (two states model), the resting state and state of activity (this applies to the cell as a whole and to its individual structures). In the resting state, the key proteins are found in the following inactive forms: natively unfolded and globular. When the cell is activated, secondary structures appear in natively unfolded proteins (including unfolded regions in other proteins), and globular proteins begin to melt and their secondary structures become available for interaction with the secondary structures of other proteins. These temporary secondary structures provide a means for highly specific interactions between proteins. As a result, native aggregation creates temporary structures necessary for cell activity."One of the principal objects of theoretical research in any department of knowledge is to find the point of view from which the subject appears in its greatest simplicity."Josiah Willard Gibbs (1839-1903).

Full text: newbielink:http://vladimirmatveev.ru [nonactive]
 

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CELL HYDROPHOBICITY: A MISSED ROLE FOR PROTEINS
« Reply #2 on: 28/07/2010 06:23:26 »

 

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