The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Can this perpetual motion concept fail to work?  (Read 19109 times)

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8650
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Can this perpetual motion concept fail to work?
« Reply #50 on: 18/09/2010 11:14:39 »
I could go for a point by point rebuttal of, at least most of, those assertions. It would be a very long post that few people would read. In any event, it's not important. There's only one important thing to note about justathought's invention.

It still stopped.
It's still not perpetual.
It still never will be.

Let me know when something changes.
 

Offline Vincent

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 90
    • View Profile
    • Universal Vortical Singularity
Can this perpetual motion concept fail to work?
« Reply #51 on: 19/09/2010 18:48:05 »
The first aeroplane could barely ferry a person across a football pitch, but it was a starting point.

The thermodynamics drinking bird (TDB) was invented in 1945, according to your logic, shouldn't the TDB be able to power at least an entire family house by now; a commercial aircraft can now carry more than 500 people in cross-continent trip.

Quote
I would like to clarify that the wheel shown in the pictures is not the final wheel design I have, but an experimental prototype to demonstrate the principles used in achieving PM. For the wheel to work, it has to have more than eight beams. For novelty reasons, I will not post the final design which also has an added feature to improve its power for practical motion.
it is therefore not correct for B C to say that it stops. The mathematical analysis proves that there would be continuous motion.

Your logic of the mathematical analysis proves that there would be continuous motion is non sequitur. Is your mathmatical analysis based on proven fact or assumption?

A mathematical analysis not based on proven principle cannot be extrapolated for reification or prove anything at all; you are putting the cart before the horse and this is not how thing works.
« Last Edit: 19/09/2010 21:29:28 by Vincent »
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8650
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Can this perpetual motion concept fail to work?
« Reply #52 on: 19/09/2010 20:01:33 »
The first aeroplane was a start because it worked.
A perpetual motion machine that doesn't work isn't a start.

If the maths says it works but reality say it doesn't; then it's not reality that's wrong.
 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11978
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Can this perpetual motion concept fail to work?
« Reply #53 on: 29/09/2010 21:45:33 »
How about this then? a Perpetual perfect orbit and with a very long staff sticking out on which we hang a perpetual oil-can, oiling the track? and the orbit is made from plates using The Casimir Force to light a very tiny bulb, made out of the newest energy-saving materials. To understand that the plates never will reach each other I refer you to the parable about the tortoise and Roger rabbit. One of a kind that is, and perfectly applicable..

The only problem I can foresee is the oil-can, but maybe it will work without that?
==

I did a careful research in the museum of unworkable devices. and I think mine is new..

(yes, I'm just joking)
« Last Edit: 29/09/2010 22:01:29 by yor_on »
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Can this perpetual motion concept fail to work?
« Reply #53 on: 29/09/2010 21:45:33 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums