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Author Topic: Is aging primarily an example of physical or chemical change?  (Read 6812 times)

Offline The Scientist

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Let us know your views on the topic. Thanks.


 

Offline neilep

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Is aging primarily an example of physical or chemical change?
« Reply #1 on: 05/07/2010 13:24:00 »
Isn't it a physical change because of a chemical change..ie the body loses it's ability to replenish with 100% perfection.....due to extraneous circumstances !
 

Offline wolfekeeper

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Is aging primarily an example of physical or chemical change?
« Reply #2 on: 05/07/2010 16:15:00 »
Chemical changes are physical changes.

Nobody knows, but it's likely to be a chemical change; or more likely several chemical changes, only one of which will typically end up limiting lifespan in any given individual.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Is aging primarily an example of physical or chemical change?
« Reply #3 on: 05/07/2010 19:45:30 »
I think it's probably a biological change.
 

Offline Bill.D.Katt.

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Is aging primarily an example of physical or chemical change?
« Reply #4 on: 07/07/2010 02:19:34 »
I heard aging is caused by the shortening of the telomeres due to the inability of our DNA to "keep all of itself in shape" during cellular reproduction. If this is true then I would side with Bored chemist, but then this change triggers other chemical changes. But of course everything is chemistry so...
 

Offline wolfekeeper

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Is aging primarily an example of physical or chemical change?
« Reply #5 on: 07/07/2010 03:19:17 »
Telomeres seems to be one factor, if you lose the Telomeres, then you're in trouble, but it's not the only thing.

There's probably several factors, it's likely that we're optimised by evolution to have the lifespans we have, and any genes that deal with factors that don't immediately limit our lifespan would have decayed, and any genes that make us die early, would have been statistically evolved out (mostly, but not necessarily completely).

We're also under attack by bacteria, parasites and viruses, and death is a fairly good way of limiting these problems in the population. If people stayed around too long they would tend to build up and spread. Death is probably to some degree pre-programmed because of this.
 

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Is aging primarily an example of physical or chemical change?
« Reply #5 on: 07/07/2010 03:19:17 »

 

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