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Author Topic: How do magnetic oils work?  (Read 12274 times)

John Burgess

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How do magnetic oils work?
« on: 09/07/2010 18:30:03 »
John Burgess  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hi Dr Chris and Team,

Great show.

Motor vehicle oil manufacturers promote "magnetic" type oils. The idea being to leave a coating of oil on the metal parts to reduce wear.

School boy physics taught that magnets are destroyed by percussion and heat. The engine is a place where both percussion and heat are in abundance therefore, surely, destroying the magnetic properties of that oil.

Are we being duped? Or have we created heat and shock resistant magnets?

Regards,

John Burgess

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 09/07/2010 18:30:03 by _system »


 

Offline tommya300

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How do magnetic oils work?
« Reply #1 on: 10/07/2010 12:57:08 »
John Burgess  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hi Dr Chris and Team,

Great show.

Motor vehicle oil manufacturers promote "magnetic" type oils. The idea being to leave a coating of oil on the metal parts to reduce wear.

School boy physics taught that magnets are destroyed by percussion and heat. The engine is a place where both percussion and heat are in abundance therefore, surely, destroying the magnetic properties of that oil.

Are we being duped? Or have we created heat and shock resistant magnets?

Regards,

John Burgess

What do you think?
.
If this is the same thing you have mentioned. The property of this oil is affected by magnetism not that is magnetic on its own. I have not seen any high profile ads you mention.
But this video explains how magnetics do affect this type of oil.

http://gadgets.boingboing.net/2008/08/13/video-dancing-magnet.html
.
« Last Edit: 10/07/2010 13:33:05 by tommya300 »
 

Offline Geezer

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How do magnetic oils work?
« Reply #2 on: 10/07/2010 20:08:55 »
John Burgess  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hi Dr Chris and Team,

Great show.

Motor vehicle oil manufacturers promote "magnetic" type oils. The idea being to leave a coating of oil on the metal parts to reduce wear.

School boy physics taught that magnets are destroyed by percussion and heat. The engine is a place where both percussion and heat are in abundance therefore, surely, destroying the magnetic properties of that oil.

Are we being duped? Or have we created heat and shock resistant magnets?

Regards,

John Burgess

What do you think?

Sounds like a load of codswallop.

The major load carrying bearing surfaces are non-ferrous, as are the pistons and possibly the cylinder walls too, so "magnetic" oil would not be attracted to those surfaces. It's probably something that was dreamed up by a twit in marketing who doesn't know what he's talking about.
 

Offline RD

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How do magnetic oils work?
« Reply #3 on: 10/07/2010 21:17:02 »
"Castrol Magnatec" oil isn't magnetic ferrofluid: it changes its properties with temperature (sticks to hot bits),
 making "intelligent molecules" according to the manufacturer ...   

http://www.castrol.com/castrol/extendedsectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=9014096&contentId=7030435
« Last Edit: 10/07/2010 21:21:46 by RD »
 

Offline tommya300

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How do magnetic oils work?
« Reply #4 on: 10/07/2010 23:37:40 »
.
Found something that has neen in back of my mind since the early 80's.
How does a mag seal functioned?
 Applications: for Cryo fluids that is in a revolving shafted area, how was it sealed from leaking out, or rather contained. This Ferrofluid answers my old question.

http://www.mrsec.wisc.edu/Edetc/background/ferrofluid/index.html
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Offline Geezer

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How do magnetic oils work?
« Reply #5 on: 10/07/2010 23:44:35 »
"Castrol Magnatec" oil isn't magnetic ferrofluid: it changes its properties with temperature (sticks to hot bits),
 making "intelligent molecules" according to the manufacturer ...   

http://www.castrol.com/castrol/extendedsectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=9014096&contentId=7030435

Ah! That makes a lot more sense - except for the "intelligent" bit of course! More marketing technobabble  ;D

Considering how upset people get about GM foods, they might want to play down the suggestion that customers pour man-made intelligent lifeforms into their car engines.


SHOCK! HORROR! Woman says car taken over by aliens!

Mrs. Lydia Teapot of 16 Acacia Avenue, Little-Gibberish-on-the-Wold claims her car is now controlled by aliens.
Said Mrs Teapot, "It all happened after I saw that nice man from Castrol on the telly......"
« Last Edit: 11/07/2010 02:55:26 by Geezer »
 

Offline tommya300

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How do magnetic oils work?
« Reply #6 on: 11/07/2010 00:03:45 »
"Castrol Magnatec" oil isn't magnetic ferrofluid: it changes its properties with temperature (sticks to hot bits),
 making "intelligent molecules" according to the manufacturer ...   

http://www.castrol.com/castrol/extendedsectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=9014096&contentId=7030435

I remember this type of lubrication before Castro had developed their own.
It was an additive that was on a payed TV AD sales, they took regular oil and put a little in a just warmed pan and you watched it spread out away from the hot spot. Then they dropped some in a different hot pan and you see it attract to the warm spot.
.
The ferrous fluid is used in a different way from which we are assuming.
I seen no ads for motor vehicles concerning ferrous type lubes.

Geezer... true pistons are made of non ferrous material, some parts of the Rings might be magnetic.
Cast iron sleeves or the cast iron block is magnetic, the steel forged crank and camshaft valve stems and rocker arms.
Babbitt bearings on the journals and mains and the bearing surface on an aluminum block may be non ferrous.
.
Personally I believe that this ferrous fluid flowing in a lubricating system may be counter productive.
Again I have not seen this type of oil advertised for car lubrication.
.
 
« Last Edit: 11/07/2010 00:07:06 by tommya300 »
 

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How do magnetic oils work?
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