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Offline annie123

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?pleasure /pain
« on: 17/07/2010 23:41:57 »
Does anyone know why the effects of pain last so much longer than pleasure, especially the psychological kind?


 

Offline neilep

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« Reply #1 on: 18/07/2010 05:36:43 »
Does anyone know why the effects of pain last so much longer than pleasure, especially the psychological kind?


This is my very very simplified opinion.....It's a bit like bad news makes more news than good news. So pain , an  unpleasurable experience, retains in your memory longer because you're thinking about the trauma or experience of a nasty event. When is the last time you can recall the date of a wonderful item in the news ?...or what you were doing and where you were at that time ?....whereas bad news makes news all the time.

I've probably explained this all wrong so lets await an expert to comment but I hope i'm kind of in the right ball-park.
 

Offline tommya300

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« Reply #2 on: 18/07/2010 15:30:43 »
Does anyone know why the effects of pain last so much longer than pleasure, especially the psychological kind?
.
I am no expert, I also would like to express my personal idea of this.
A human emotion, with a sense of survival built in to our system. Possibilities and probabilities in our thinking process.
 Example of a simple situation.
 We remember burning our fingers on a match, our body and mind remembers and tells us to avoid the possible similar new situation.
I think the recall of bad things stem from this built in alarm system.
I don't remember the date but only it hurt.

 Recalling some good times, not all, without something to stimulate my memory.
I remember the first time I had fun with my first girlfriend, I do not remember the date, but I remember the pleasures.
 I remember getting Married, I remember my Bride being a little nervous that her stomach ached and had
 the runs ( bad and funny now. but then, well #$%~!#$%^&!
 I remember it was good time, I remember (the bad), the ouch cost of the reception, I remember everyone
 had a smile, I remember the food was good, I even remember the date too, which is rare for a man child. The day was almost flawless, it was foggy and rainy, no Outdoor Park pictures. That Park was only 300 feet down the road, that can be good or bad depending the way it is looked at...

I guess the survival memories, (associate bad memories), are stronger, that they trump them all.
Without them, the experience of the second (next) similar danger that reoccurs, may leave me in a state that the, (my perception of being rare), pleasure memories would not be able to be reproduced in my future, because I may not be so lucky to escape the bad results and might leave me in a new possible state.
The natural selection of these memories, are then determined by your own character, whether if they are bad or good..
Accurate or not, this is only from my personal observation
.
« Last Edit: 18/07/2010 16:14:26 by tommya300 »
 

Offline annie123

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« Reply #3 on: 19/07/2010 19:27:03 »
Yes, some of this is true i expect. But I wondered whether the so called 'happiness gene' has something to do with it - some babies have been shown to be more predisposed to smiles etc than others at quite a young age. Also, one's conditioning while young can also make one focus more on one's failings than successes, especially in generations prior to the great self esteem era (which I think has many problems too). But it seems to me that one can physically feel more sad for much longer than keep pleasurable feelings - hence I would think why so many people seem to be depressed nowadays.Is a drug released that stays around longer in the brain? Spencer Wells (the DNA project guy) predicts that mental illness will be the second greatest medical ailment of the future - and given the exponential increase of the labelling of depressive or sad symptoms this might well happen.
 

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« Reply #3 on: 19/07/2010 19:27:03 »

 

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