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Author Topic: Why do I still feel like I'm at sea?  (Read 4003 times)

Jenny Wiersma

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Why do I still feel like I'm at sea?
« on: 05/08/2010 07:30:03 »
Jenny Wiersma asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hallo Chris
 
Three years ago my partner & I were invited to the Seychelles to look after a friends 90' catamaran.
 
To start with our journey involved a flight from CT to Johannesburg & then from JHB to Mahé Seychelles.  We sailed with our friends around the islands for a week before they returned to France. After a couple of days I noticed that I had adopted the very shallow rocking motion we experienced on board whilst tied on the jetty. Having cruised extensively before I thought the rocking feeling would leave me as soon as we were on terra firma again. However it did not. Must also just mention that our week's cruise ended in a very rough sail and feeling very seasick. I was lying down in the saloon with my head to the bow and feet to stern. We experienced severe forward jerking whilst taking heavy seas over the bow.
 
It has  been 3 years now and the rocking from side to side motion is with me all the time as soon as I get onto my feet. As long as my head & eyes are perfectly still I don't "rock" . I suffer with severe lower back pain, I guess from the constant subconscious rocking like a tall palm in the wind. Others notice it only when I am having a particularly bad day or have not slept well. Incidentally, I don't feel the rocking at all when I'm lying down.  On rare occasions I feel nauseas. I saw a  Neurologist & ENT specialist 3 years ago and they could find nothing.
 
Hope you have an answer
 
Kind regards
 
 
Jenny Wiersma

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 05/08/2010 07:30:03 by _system »


 

Offline Jemayka

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Why do I still feel like I'm at sea?
« Reply #1 on: 05/08/2010 18:33:48 »
hello  [O8)]
 

Offline neilep

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Why do I still feel like I'm at sea?
« Reply #2 on: 05/08/2010 18:41:14 »
Hello !
 

Offline RD

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Why do I still feel like I'm at sea?
« Reply #3 on: 05/08/2010 22:22:00 »
Maybe the rough sea voyage displaced otoliths which are now causing vertigo .


also see ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mal_de_debarquement
« Last Edit: 05/08/2010 22:27:37 by RD »
 

Offline tommya300

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Why do I still feel like I'm at sea?
« Reply #4 on: 06/08/2010 05:42:41 »
Jenny oh I sympathise.
 We'll make a long story less long, the Dr. told me of a procedure, that he said works and sounds to simple to be affective.

The inner ear is what keeps our balance in check. These are little channels that have fine like hairy walls and inside the channel contains a fluid. Procedure consists of they place and strap the patient on a table that rocks and tilts on all the axes 360 deg. they manipulate the patience' body in a planed proportional way to redistribute the fluid.
 It is not a one shot deal and I do not know the name of it either.

.   
« Last Edit: 07/08/2010 19:02:47 by tommya300 »
 

Offline RD

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Why do I still feel like I'm at sea?
« Reply #5 on: 06/08/2010 09:16:09 »
Dr. told me of a procedure, that he said works and sounds to simple to be affective.
It is not a one shot deal and I do not know the name of it either.

Quote
There are two primary maneuvers: CRP (the Epley maneuver) and the Semont-Liberatory maneuver. The choice of maneuver depends on results of the Dix-Hallpike test  (revealing which canal is involved) and whether or not the otoconia is inside the canal (canalithiasis) or hung up on the cupula of the canal (cupulolithiasis).

CRP is thought to be effective in canalithiasis because it can help move the free-floating canaliths from the sensitive area (semicircular canal) into a place where it won't cause vertigo. It can be used to treat BPPV of the posterior semicircular canal or the anterior semicircular canal. Most people undergoing the procedure do so for posterior canal BPPV.

These maneuvers must only be performed by a professional specifically trained to perform them, who can safeguard against possible neck or back injury as well as determine whether certain health conditions (such as perilymph fistula, detached retina, vertebrovascular insufficiency, esophageal reflux, and others) exclude a person from being a candidate for this procedure. Potential complications from this procedure include the possibility of neck/back injury or debris moving into another canal.
http://www.vestibular.org/vestibular-disorders/treatment/canalith-repositioning.php

http://www.webmd.com/brain/liberatory-maneuvers-for-vertigo

Success rates of canalith repositioning procedures ...
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10907384
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11080927
« Last Edit: 06/08/2010 09:36:44 by RD »
 

Offline tommya300

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Why do I still feel like I'm at sea?
« Reply #6 on: 06/08/2010 10:06:05 »
yep that is what he explained, Thanks RD
 

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Why do I still feel like I'm at sea?
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