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Author Topic: What recovery is possible following a stroke?  (Read 5739 times)

Offline MartinTheK

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What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« on: 07/08/2010 19:29:13 »
This may be a story - like the giant rat of Sumatra - for which the naked scientists are not prepared. I shall tread as delicately as possible.

I am a 64 year old man 22 months out from an ischemic pontine stroke. I have had slow steady progress in rehabing the moderate hemiparesis of my affected non-dominant left arm. Mostly by using it as much as possible in my normal activities...It has remained a frustrating loss of capacity however.

Recently, I have been able to resume an activity which was denied to me since the onset of my disability. After about 6 weeks I have noticed remarkable improvement of about 10% in my active range of motion and fine finger dexterity.

1. Is this Phenomenon generally true?
2. Is it true for both genders?
3. Are different neural pathways activated during these particular activities?
4. Are different specific activities of differing efficacy in stroke rehab?

These questions occur to me as I sit here practicing moving my hand. I would love to see some sort of multivariate analysis done, by someone with the resources to do more than my anecdotal observation.

« Last Edit: 12/08/2011 21:54:33 by chris »


 

Offline tommya300

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Re: What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« Reply #1 on: 07/08/2010 22:52:09 »
Physical theropy helps in many ways, if it were juat a phenomina, the medical field would not embrace it..
Motion and will always changes something in our body's structure. and everything has its individual limitations all we can do is press that envelope as far as we can and more, to get results.
 
Indirectly related but the applications may be endless.

http://www.scq.ubc.ca/resurrecting-damaged-neurons-are-we-fighting-a-hopeless-battle/
 

Offline neilep

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Re: What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« Reply #2 on: 08/08/2010 11:52:33 »
Congratulations on your progress Martin...albeit slowly. Wishing you continued improvement.
 

Offline RD

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Re: What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« Reply #3 on: 08/08/2010 13:03:37 »
A search term which may help your research is "neuroplasticity".
 

Offline MartinTheK

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Re: What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« Reply #4 on: 08/08/2010 16:08:44 »
I can think of a number of (ahem) search terms.  :)

In the US I would hire a grant writer and go after the big bucks from some mega foundation (BP perhaps?) I wonder if science is pursued differently elsewhere?
 

Offline RD

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Re: What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« Reply #5 on: 08/08/2010 17:58:56 »
I can think of a number of (ahem) search terms.  :)

Like "Functional Electrical Stimulation Enhancement of Upper Extremity Functional Recovery During Stroke Rehabilitation" 
[for some reason TNS won't let me post the link* to this scientific paper so you'll have to Google the quote]

 or "Prevention or retardation of disuse atrophy" ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrical_muscle_stimulation


* Aha !, "sagepub" is the blocked word (or contains one) which will not permit me to post the link on TNS.
So replace "1234567" in the URL below by "sagepub" ...
http://nnr.1234567.com/content/21/3/207.full.pdf+html
« Last Edit: 08/08/2010 18:34:49 by RD »
 

Offline MartinTheK

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Re: What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« Reply #6 on: 08/08/2010 19:09:19 »
The subject of Neuroplasticity is well represented in the literature. I was interested here because I think that a well designed study of existing stroke patients may well show that a great deal of benefit can be derived without a great deal of clinical intervention (and expense) stroke rehab in the US is boocoo tres expensive.

For instance, I could have gone to an expensive rehab clinic if I had high grade health insurance ( like a general motors worker ) I got about a weeks worth after the initial month of hospitalization and rehab because I am a Viet-Nam era veteran. Other people with out my luck may well get diddly-squat. Which is execrable.

But in fact, a great form of therapy is found in washing the dishes and petting the little kitty-cat ("Masha")...If more benefit can be derived from regularly making beautiful music..I would love to see that knowledge made generally available as opposed to an expensive government program (probably at the expense of perinatal health)
 

Offline oc1dean

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Re: What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« Reply #7 on: 05/08/2011 18:18:22 »
The real problem here is that stroke survivors are not given a damage diagnosis.  Without that they have no way of telling if easy neuroplasticity, recovery of the penumbra or bleed drainage damage is possible or if they have to do hard neuroplasticity, move functions to a new area of the brain.
 

Offline Zoey

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Re: What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« Reply #8 on: 07/08/2011 18:59:31 »
 I hope the original poster is still checking in here and still improving. My left side from the waist up side was "hopelessly" paralyzed in 1982 from a massive stroke. During the stroke the main artery to my right hemisphere ruptured where it feeds from the carotid so there was no option for putting in a shunt. I was comatose for eight days and not expected to live. Over many years and a number of setbacks my recovery from paralysis is complete other than a barely noticeable drooping on the left side of my face.
  That sort of recovery is unusual, but I contend it can and should be the normal course of stroke recovery. Dr. Edward Taub at the University of Alabama has pioneered a movement therapy for overcoming paralysis from strokes (and I think he is working with traumatic brain injury now also). The technique is called "constraint induced movement therapy" and here is one link about it:
http://www.health.uab.edu/17653/
  If the original poster has not fully recovered, don't give up hope. I had a wonderful physical therapist who helped get my paralyzed torso to respond and fully recover over a five year period. And she started working with me twelve years after that side was paralyzed, so don't let the time of recovery discourage you either. There is no maximine time for recovery, despite what many experts may say.
 

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Offline Jaylin

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What recovery is possible following a stroke?
« Reply #9 on: 04/10/2011 08:16:42 »
Shrunk
I hope the original poster is still checking in here and still improving. My left side from the waist up side was "hopelessly" paralyzed in 1982 from a massive stroke. During the stroke the main artery to my right hemisphere ruptured where it feeds from the carotid so there was no option for putting in a shunt. I was comatose for eight days and not expected to live. Over many years and a number of setbacks my recovery from paralysis is complete other than a barely noticeable drooping on the left side of my face.
  That sort of recovery is unusual, but I contend it can and should be the normal course of stroke recovery. Dr. Edward Taub at the University of Alabama has pioneered a movement therapy for overcoming paralysis from strokes (and I think he is working with traumatic brain injury now also). The technique is called "constraint induced movement therapy" and here is one link about it:
newbielink:http://www.health.uab.edu/17653/ [nonactive]
  If the original poster has not fully recovered, don't give up hope. I had a wonderful physical therapist who helped get my paralyzed torso to respond and fully recover over a five year period. And she started working with me twelve years after that side was paralyzed, so don't let the time of recovery discourage you either. There is no maximine time for recovery, despite what many experts may say.

hmm like ur post u really shared a very helpful material by doing this some of the features of physical therapy i already know some of them is quite new for me thanks for updating me...........

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« Last Edit: 10/10/2011 09:59:21 by imatfaal »
 

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What recovery is possible following a stroke?
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