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Offline strongfoundation1

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« on: 12/08/2010 03:24:28 »
I have some important questions to inquire about here but I can only ask them to a certain person or rather certain people in the know.  What I mean is are there any people (Geologists) here who if I told them that I wanted them to be part of a team of people to build an vintage Ferrari from scratch and I need you to find all the raw materials for every piece of the automobile, they or you all would be able to do it comfortably. (steel, iron, copper, aluminum, and others)  Is there anyone here with those skills/knowledge set?  Only someone with that skillset can answer the question I need to ask here.

I have my fingers crossed that someone here meets this criteria... 


 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #1 on: 12/08/2010 04:05:16 »
I'm sure there are. This could be a rather expensive undertaking, but I have to wonder why you would start from raw materials mined from the ground. I'm pretty sure vintage Ferraris incorporated a fair amount of recycled metal, so starting with raw materials might not make a reproduction any more authentic.

Would it not make more sense to analyse the alloy compositions of an original and duplicate those alloys?
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #2 on: 12/08/2010 05:10:59 »
And there is also the rubber of the wiring and tires, cloth for the seats and fibers for the cushions. More than just metals in a vintage Ferrari.

There are at least 6 people who post here that are professional geologists or students. One of the more frequent posters is a student who is more abreast of current thinking than an old guy like me who was educated as a geologist in the 60's and because of working full time has been hard pressed to keep up with current thinking.

Geology has become more and more segregated into specialties in the last 40 years.  It is difficult to keep up even with your specialty unless you read new papers almost every day.

 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #3 on: 12/08/2010 07:47:01 »
I'm sure there are.
Well, I just want to be 100% sure that someone knowledgeable in this area is present before I go into details about my plan.  I hope those persons are able to see this thread soon and identify themselves. :)  I do this because I have inquired about my plans in other mediums and I have received advice but I'm always very reluctant to follow it.  This is because the people who gave me advice work in Geology related fields but they are not 100% absolutely sure that they could do what I'm trying to learn about.  And that is raises my doubts.  I feel perfectly comfortable if someone who advises me is able to definitively state that they are able to do the work with no problems. :)  I'll be patient and wait though!  :)
 

Offline Mazurka

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« Reply #4 on: 12/08/2010 12:24:22 »
There are a number of geologists on here that could identify suitable ores to extract metals from (and some likely locations).  I suspect some could also discuss the techniques needed to extract, concentrate and refine those ores too. 

I guess the difficulty is whether you are looking for people with actual hands on experience of the necessary processes.  For example, whislt there are people that have experience of the extractive industries, I am not so sure that anyone on here has actually physically minned haemeatite, coal and limestone, coked the coal, produced the quick lime, built and operated a blast furnace and a bessemer converter, to produce steel...

However, I am sure we can help with the theory and offer some tips.  Try us! 

 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #5 on: 12/08/2010 19:26:07 »
As an economic geologist (mining industry) I'll be happy to try to help- but need more specific information as to what to want (raw ore? processed materials?) and where these materials need to be found.
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #6 on: 12/08/2010 19:57:08 »
Quote
I guess the difficulty is whether you are looking for people with actual hands on experience of the necessary processes.  For example, whislt there are people that have experience of the extractive industries, I am not so sure that anyone on here has actually physically minned haemeatite, coal and limestone, coked the coal, produced the quick lime, built and operated a blast furnace and a bessemer converter, to produce steel...
Yes, that is almost exactly the sort of experienced professionals that I am looking.  If someone has no hands-on experience then I have no choice but to presume that everything they speak of is speculation.  Like I stated, what you have described above is almost exactly what I’m looking for.  You left out the first step though.  That step is actually locating the materials themselves.
Quote
I'll be happy to try to help- but need more specific information as to what to want (raw ore? processed materials?) and where these materials need to be found.
I would need guidance in:
1. the specifics of where and how to go about locating the particular materials/minerals needed such as copper, iron, limestone, etc.  (so, you would stating where these materials can be found)
2. how to extract the materials/minerals
3. next, how to turn the raw materials that we now have into the many different metals that we need to manufacture the automobile listed above.

If I am correct, that would be the extent of the Geologist’s role in manufacturing the automobile.  Unless there are blacksmiths on this forum, then that would be extent of this forum also.  At that point, we would have our different specific metals needed to manufacture the automobile.  Next, I would start working with a blacksmith to turn the blocks of different metals into the many different part components that will comprise the automobile. 

@Bass – When you see the areas above that I need guidance in, you don’t have to post here how to do what I listed.  What I am thinking you will do as you read what I posted is say to yourself, “Ok, I can do everything he listed in steps number one, two, and three easily” OR “I can do steps one and three but not two” or something like that.  Once you’ve identified what you can do then you can simply post here what you can or can not do.  This way, you (or others also) have briefly and simply identified what you can do and maybe others can chime in and state that they are able to do that what others could not.  After that, I can go into the particulars of my plan comfortably.  :)
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #7 on: 13/08/2010 16:07:22 »
I would need guidance in:
1. the specifics of where and how to go about locating the particular materials/minerals needed such as copper, iron, limestone, etc.  (so, you would stating where these materials can be found)
2. how to extract the materials/minerals
3. next, how to turn the raw materials that we now have into the many different metals that we need to manufacture the automobile listed above.

If I am correct, that would be the extent of the Geologist’s role in manufacturing the automobile.  Unless there are blacksmiths on this forum, then that would be extent of this forum also.  At that point, we would have our different specific metals needed to manufacture the automobile.  Next, I would start working with a blacksmith to turn the blocks of different metals into the many different part components that will comprise the automobile. 

@Bass – When you see the areas above that I need guidance in, you don’t have to post here how to do what I listed.  What I am thinking you will do as you read what I posted is say to yourself, “Ok, I can do everything he listed in steps number one, two, and three easily” OR “I can do steps one and three but not two” or something like that.  Once you’ve identified what you can do then you can simply post here what you can or can not do.  This way, you (or others also) have briefly and simply identified what you can do and maybe others can chime in and state that they are able to do that what others could not.  After that, I can go into the particulars of my plan comfortably.  :)


My profession covers item #1 and #2 (finding and extracting minerals) and I have some experience with #3 (processing)- but a metallurgist could give you more complete guidance in that area.  Putting together the necessary alloys is complicated and may require some unusual minerals and processes.  How do you propose to cast the metals (ie engine block) or roll steel for other components?
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #8 on: 13/08/2010 21:20:39 »
but a metallurgist could give you more complete guidance in that area.  Putting together the necessary alloys is complicated and may require some unusual minerals and processes.
And are there any metallurgists here on the forum that would be able to do this or would I need to seek out a metallurgy focused forum? 

Ok, this is my situation. 

Me: Student
current goal: build 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa completely from scratch
knowledge areas required: geology (find materials), mining (extract materials), blacksmithing/metal working (manipulate materials), ?
knowledge already possessed: none
plan of action: study textbooks associated with speicifc university degree required courses that are needed in the “knowledge areas required” section above.

What I’m doing now: studying MIT’s Geology program = reading all the textbooks associated with the requirements for their Bsc Geology degree

http://web.mit.edu/catalog/degre.scien.ch12.html [nofollow]   
http://eapsweb.mit.edu/education/undergrad/classes/classes.html [nofollow]

Current textbook:
- Sears and Zemansky's University physics : with modern physics.    San Francisco : Pearson Addison Wesley, c2008  0321501217 

Completed textbooks:
None

Knowledge gained:
none so far

Current goal: Go through all of the textbooks for the MIT Bsc Geology degree.  Attain the required knowledge that will enable me to go out and find the materials that I need to build the abovementioned automobile from scratch.  Namely, iron, copper, steel, aluminum, and others

Goals completed:
none
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #9 on: 13/08/2010 21:24:13 »
Below I will list all of the textbooks associated with MIT’s Geology degree.  I have to decide whether or not I will read all of the texts because as you will notice they are not all related to what my goal is for going through all the course textbooks associated with MIT’s Geology degree.  To state that goal once again, it is to be able to go out and find the materials that I need to build the abovementioned automobile from scratch.  Namely, iron, copper, steel, aluminum, and others.

Query:
What specific information is this textbook going to teach me that will show me how to go out and find materials that I need to build the above-mentioned automobile from scratch.  Namely, iron, copper, steel, aluminum, and others?  If this text does not further my knowledge in this regard then there is NO need for me to read this textbook.  HOWEVER, if this textbook will teach me specific information that I will later use in other knowledge areas needed to build the aforementioned automobile from scratch then an exception can be made and I can elect to read the text.

Texts listed in requirement for MIT’s Geology degree (this list will be regularly updated)
1. Sears and Zemansky's University physics : with modern physics.  San Francisco : Pearson Addison Wesley, c2008  0321501217     
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
2. Essentials of introductory classical mechanics : MIT 8.01 study guide
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
3. An introduction to mechanics [by] Daniel Kleppner [and] Robert J. Kolenkow
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
4. Understanding Earth.   New York : W.H. Freeman, c2007
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
5. How to build a habitable planet / Wallace S. Broecker.   
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
6. Calculus with analytic geometry / George F. Simmons
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
7. Calculus / by Tom M. Apostol
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
8. Introduction to electricity and magnetism : MIT 8.02 course notes
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
9. Electricity and magnetism / Edward M. Purcell
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
10. Div, grad, curl, and all that : an informal text on vector calculus / H.M. Schey
Worth reading ___       Waste of time  ___   (check one)
Specific reasons why:
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #10 on: 13/08/2010 21:32:22 »
So, there it is.  That is what I want to do.  Basically, I am a student and I want to learn exactly what I need to know to be able to build an automobile from scratch.  This does not mean that I will do it right now.  I may build after a couple of years.  I still need to work to survive currently but I want to learn everything that I need to learn right now.  I don't want to go to college and study there because what I want to learn is far too varied for a college atmosphere.  That doesn't mean I want to do everything myself.  I will try consult with and work with local college professors to help me understand difficult concepts/ideas but primarily everything will be online, I forsee.  And that is why I wanted to make sure that someone who knows their stuff definitely advises me because otherwise I may end up getting confused.  I look forward to working with everyone here, starting off with you bass!  [8D]

This isn't the first forum that I have stated my plans in.  I have requested advice on cnc machining forums, mining forums, another separate geology forum, blacksmithing forums as well.  But Geology (locating and extracting minerals) is the very foundation on which I must build my knowledge base and progress so that's why I'm here.
 

Offline frethack

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« Reply #11 on: 13/08/2010 22:11:14 »
Youre going to need a lot more than MIT's geology program.  I am in a comparable program and am light years away from being able to build a Ferrari from scratch.  In fact, I couldnt even build a Pinto from scratch. 

I wish you lots of luck.  If you can pull it off, you deserve a PhD.
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #12 on: 13/08/2010 23:32:41 »
@bass - I can understand that as a professional geologist, you’re probably busy most of the time.  So, I don’t want to take up too much of your time.  But what I’m requesting from you is simply guidance.  If you (bass) woke up in the middle of nowhere stranded alone nude, because of your specific skillset you would be able to locate and extract minerals to further use for whatever purpose you see fit.  That is the knowledge I want to acquire.  So, I’d like to know:

1. How do I go about learning this essential information?  Is my current approach ok?  What texts/books should I be reading if any? 

I know that the process for each mineral is a bit different and for certain minerals, the processes are very different.  Therefore, after hearing your general thoughts about my plans as a whole, I would like to start off with A. iron  and then we can move on to  B. Bronze and Copper  and so on.

But I will do all the work/required reading myself.  I just need guidance so I’m not wasting any time at all.  I understand that this may take a while, so that’s fine.  I'm looking for specific advice akin to, "Ok, read this and this.  Those books will teach you __ which is important for __ and __.  If you have any question post them here."  I just want to start learning and asking specific content-related questions soon as I can so I can see some progress however slight. 
« Last Edit: 13/08/2010 23:36:22 by strongfoundation1 »
 

Offline tommya300

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« Reply #13 on: 14/08/2010 01:05:25 »
but a metallurgist could give you more complete guidance in that area.  Putting together the necessary alloys is complicated and may require some unusual minerals and processes.
And are there any metallurgists here on the forum that would be able to do this or would I need to seek out a metallurgy focused forum? 

Ok, this is my situation. 

Me: Student
current goal: build 1957 Ferrari 250 Testa Rossa completely from scratch
knowledge areas required: geology (find materials), mining (extract materials), blacksmithing/metal working (manipulate materials), ?
knowledge already possessed: none
plan of action: study textbooks associated with speicifc university degree required courses that are needed in the “knowledge areas required” section above.

What I’m doing now: studying MIT’s Geology program = reading all the textbooks associated with the requirements for their Bsc Geology degree

http://web.mit.edu/catalog/degre.scien.ch12.html   
http://eapsweb.mit.edu/education/undergrad/classes/classes.html

Current textbook:
- Sears and Zemansky's University physics : with modern physics.    San Francisco : Pearson Addison Wesley, c2008  0321501217 

Completed textbooks:
None

Knowledge gained:
none so far

Current goal: Go through all of the textbooks for the MIT Bsc Geology degree.  Attain the required knowledge that will enable me to go out and find the materials that I need to build the abovementioned automobile from scratch.  Namely, iron, copper, steel, aluminum, and others

Goals completed:
none


Don't forget Titanium and Chrome Moly, Smithy
Good luck in the build
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #14 on: 14/08/2010 02:52:26 »
As frethack mentioned- this is huge undertaking.  I'm not sure you'll be able to pull it off with simple tools- some of the alloys are too complicated.

Ok.  Let's start with iron (and assume you know nothing).  First you need a basic chemical understanding of iron (valences, bonding, reactions, etc).  Perhaps one of the chemists on this forum can better advise you as to the proper textbooks for chemical properties of iron.

In searching for iron deposits, the oxidation state of iron is critical to understanding favorable geologic environments.  Iron is one of the most abundant elements in the crust.  Unfortunately, most iron in the crust is bound up in minerals and is unusable as a source.  Concentrated iron deposits are usually bonded with oxygen (magnetite, hematite)- though iron sulfide (pyrite, pyrrhotite, marcasite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite) and iron hydroxide deposits have also been used.

Probably the easiest attainable iron is hematite (and easiest to work with).  Massive banded iron formations in very old rocks (Precambrian) are by far the largest sources for iron works in the world today.

What sort of geologic knowledge do you need to find iron ore? 
1.  An understanding of basic geologic processes
2. An understanding of geologic environments.
3. An understanding of geochemical concepts, especially solubility in various Eh and pH conditions.
4. Knowledge of the geologic time scale.
5. Once you have mastered these concepts, you can move on to historical geology and the concepts of geologic paleo-environments.
6. Economic geology- ore formation and prospecting methods.

Books- start with a basic geology textbook (use whatever is available at MIT).  There are numerous texts on historical geology and geochemistry. Likewise, there are numerous economic geology texts.  One series you might find very useful is "Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967"  Somewhat dated, but most of the concepts are still valid for your purposes.  Describes various kinds of ore deposits- which will also be useful as you continue on to other elements.  Most state geologic surveys have a minerals and mines branch that can supply you with more specific information on mining operations in each state.

Good luck.  Keep us informed with your progress and please post any questions that come up.
 

Offline JimBob

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« Reply #15 on: 15/08/2010 03:51:57 »
You also need to know how to make tools. When I am in the field I use a rock hammer. (Bass uses a 40 pound sledge - he and I looked a a possible gold mining property in Nevada a year and a half ago and when Bass pulled this huge wood-handled thing out of the bed of his Chevy Avalanche I thought he was going to play Paul Bunion or some similar American mythological person!)

But to get to the stage where the head was made it first took some ancient man a long time to learn how to nap flint to be able to cut down trees to make a fire to smelt iron. Then they had to learn how to make charcoal for the process of making steel. There is a lot of technology leading up to getting the tools to make a car and much of it doesn't have to do with geology as a science at all. It is the evolution of civilization.
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #16 on: 15/08/2010 14:16:29 »
You also need to know how to make tools.
I’m going to send you a PM regarding that JimBob if you don’t mind.  I want to keep this thread focused on Geology as much as possible.  But you are correct and I have researched this a bit as well.  But I want to make sure that I keep everything as action-focused as possible.  So, that’s a great point you made, I think it would awesome if you were able to list the best book(s) to solve the particular area you mention like -> “You also need to know how to make tools.  Get the book The art of FlintKnapping by D.C. Waldorf and it will teach you what you need to know in this area.”  That would leave me nothing to say but “Thank you, I’ll head straight to the library, obtain this book, and read this text at the same time that I’m reading the Geology texts that bass has approved.” (read below)  That way, I can steer clear of too much discussion and I can get to work.  I am very guilty of getting carried away and talking too much when I need to be studying and learning making progress.  I am actively working on eliminating that problem as you can see.   

But yeah, correct me if I’m wrong but “The art of Flintknapping” is THE text that will teach me how to make tools like you are referring to.  I’ll pm you a bit later about the other texts that I will need also.  (namely, best book for survival skills like the skills you briefly mentioned in your post above: make a fire to smelt iron -> ___ (book), learn how to make charcoal -> ___ (book), etc. and so forth)  But yeah, I will PM you and we can go in-depth about this for sure!  :)
start with a basic geology textbook (use whatever is available at MIT)
Thank you for the advice in your post, bass.  Ok, so I have searched for and found four texts that might cover all six areas that you posted.  If they don’t or one or more of them don’t, then please recommend me another one in it’s place that will explain what you posted.  So, here are the texts including the one that you recommended:
Understanding Earth by John Grotzinger
Geochemistry : pathways and processes
Historical Geology: Evolution of Earth and Life Through Time
Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967


Ok, so that is what I have so far.  Please correct me if I am wrong but Understanding Earth will explain precisely:
1. An understanding of basic geologic processes.
2. An understanding of geologic environments.

Geochemistry : pathways and processes will take care of:
3. An understanding of geochemical concepts, especially solubility in various Eh and pH conditions.
4. Knowledge of the geologic time scale.

Historical Geology: Evolution of Earth and Life Through Time will take care of:
5. Once you have mastered these concepts, you can move on to historical geology and the concepts of geologic paleo-environments.

And finally, the book you recommended Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967 will take care of:
6. Economic geology- ore formation and prospecting methods.


So, is that all good to go, bass?  You can just say yes or no to each book that I posted or write more if you have the time.  I will get to reading as soon as you ok the above.

*Note - I’m having a pretty difficult time finding a copy of “Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967” online and in libraries... :(
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #17 on: 15/08/2010 16:06:52 »
For economic geology- I would suggest
First: An Introduction to Economic Geology and Its Environmental Impact
Then:  Ore Geology and Industrial Minerals, and Introduction

These are both very readable and will introduce the concepts of mineral exploration and mining.

Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967 is more a geologic description of various types of ore deposits- but you need a basic understanding of geologic concepts first.
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #18 on: 16/08/2010 08:51:43 »
Understanding Earth by John Grotzinger
Geochemistry : pathways and processes
Historical Geology: Evolution of Earth and Life Through Time
Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967


Ok, so that is what I have so far.  Please correct me if I am wrong but Understanding Earth will explain precisely:
1. An understanding of basic geologic processes.
2. An understanding of geologic environments.

Geochemistry : pathways and processes will take care of:
3. An understanding of geochemical concepts, especially solubility in various Eh and pH conditions.
4. Knowledge of the geologic time scale.

Historical Geology: Evolution of Earth and Life Through Time will take care of:
5. Once you have mastered these concepts, you can move on to historical geology and the concepts of geologic paleo-environments.

And finally, the book you recommended Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967 will take care of:
6. Economic geology- ore formation and prospecting methods.
@Bass - I just want to be sure of your instructions.  So you are instructing me to delete the four books I posted above along with the outlined plan as well and instead just focus on the three texts in your most recent post and read them in the order that you have posted them.  Correct?  Thank you!  I'll be updating this thread with questions/confusing areas that I have as I encounter them.
« Last Edit: 16/08/2010 09:15:49 by strongfoundation1 »
 

Offline Bass

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« Reply #19 on: 16/08/2010 16:56:12 »
Not at all.  I was just suggesting good texts for gaining an understanding in econcomic geology portion.  As I stated, Ore Deposits in the US is not so much a text as a description of mines in the US.

The books you cited will work well to help educate you in the areas of basic geology, historical geology and geochemistry.  Most economic iron deposits are stratified within sedimentary sequences, so you still need to understand those concepts.
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #20 on: 16/08/2010 20:28:18 »
And finally, the book you recommended Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967 will take care of:
6. Economic geology- ore formation and prospecting methods.
Ah, ok.  So you were referring to the above portion and substituting "Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967" for the other two texts you mentioned.  Thank you for the clarification.  The updated course of action I'll be following is below:
Understanding Earth by John Grotzinger
Geochemistry : pathways and processes
Historical Geology: Evolution of Earth and Life Through Time
Ore Deposits in the United States 1933-1967


Ok, so that is what I have so far.  Please correct me if I am wrong but Understanding Earth will explain precisely:
1. An understanding of basic geologic processes.
2. An understanding of geologic environments.

Geochemistry : pathways and processes will take care of:
3. An understanding of geochemical concepts, especially solubility in various Eh and pH conditions.
4. Knowledge of the geologic time scale.

Historical Geology: Evolution of Earth and Life Through Time will take care of:
5. Once you have mastered these concepts, you can move on to historical geology and the concepts of geologic paleo-environments.

And finally, the books you recommended An Introduction to Economic Geology and Its Environmental Impact and Ore Geology and Industrial Minerals, and Introduction will take care of:
6. Economic geology- ore formation and prospecting methods.
And I'll be studying these books in addition to a chemistry book that explains the chemistry of iron well.  I posted in the Chemistry forum here but no-one still hasn't recommended a text for me yet.  I think I may have to inquire on another Chemistry board...
« Last Edit: 19/08/2010 06:45:04 by strongfoundation1 »
 

Offline Mazurka

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« Reply #21 on: 17/08/2010 13:21:53 »
I assume you have seen the Toaster Project?

http://www.thomasthwaites.com/thomas/toaster/page2.htm

(although he is factually incorrect, the last deep iron mine in western Europe (Florence) most recently extracted some haematite in 2008 and subject to being dewatered, there is still plenty of ore to go at) 
 

Offline peppercorn

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« Reply #22 on: 17/08/2010 14:01:23 »
I assume you have seen the Toaster Project?
http://www.thomasthwaites.com/thomas/toaster/page2.htm
Quote
I'm Thomas Thwaites and I'm trying to build a toaster, from scratch - beginning by mining the raw materials and ending with a product that Argos sells for only £3.99. A toaster. ...
The Toaster Project has been exhibited at the Royal College of Art SHOW TWO, London...
Now there's an modern art 'installation' I wouldn't mind seeing! [I'm not saying most modern art is rubbish BTW!]  I do think it would be more thought provoking than many pieces though.

SF1, have you considered a project maybe more on this scale, than going straight off for a classic Ferrari?

If it's a simple homage to this historic machine, how about going this route:
Ferrari 312PB Scale Model with working engine
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #23 on: 18/08/2010 12:03:25 »
@Mazurka - Thank you very much for that link.  I was not aware of the toaster project until you just mentioned it.  Reading that website in detail made me feel so so much better about what I want to do.  I could have sworn that I was all alone and that no-one else in the whole world had any interest or experience in what I seek to do. 

@peppercorn - My mouth dropped to the floor after watching that video!  I’m still halfway in disbelief.  Great links by you all to show that I can in fact achieve what I’m striving to do here but it may take some time.

I have more to add but I’m currently trying to work my way through “Understanding Earth” so I won’t talk too much.
 

Offline strongfoundation1

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« Reply #24 on: 20/08/2010 01:46:05 »
I know that I said, regarding the textbooks listed and my plan of action, that I was going to read the textbooks through once and then ask any questions that I have but the idea of atoms is confusing me.  Like I said, I’m reading “Understanding Earth” right now and I’m reading quite a lot about atoms, protons, etc. about the different minerals.  I’m wondering what is this all about.  Atoms can’t be seen so I’m wondering is this something worth looking into or just skipping it unless I encounter a problem directly related to knowing that information.  I googled “can atoms be seen” and I found these links:
http://education.jlab.org/qa/history_03.html [nofollow]
http://education.jlab.org/qa/history_04.html [nofollow]

I like the caveman example they listed.  That is basically my situation exactly!  I’m a caveman when it comes to science/math.  With that said, I think it best if I disregard the sections of the text regarding atoms, etc. since that requires a more advanced knowledge of science or whatever. 

At the same time though, I also started wondering about the periodic table of elements after the article referenced it.  For the minerals related to Geology that are listed there, I think they are simple for a caveman to understand.  A person (geologist) found different minerals (elements) and gave them names arbitrarily based on their appearance/hardness.  However, at this stage, other elements aren’t easily learned by a caveman.  One such example would be krypton. 
http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele036.html [nofollow]

The history of how it was founded mentions liquid air.  After googling for it, understanding it is not for beginners (cavemen).

So, I’ll ignore these sections until I attain the necessary foundational knowledge required to be able to understand what the text is saying.  Is that all correct?
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Finding materials
« Reply #24 on: 20/08/2010 01:46:05 »

 

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