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Author Topic: If your GP gave you advice/opinion on which degree to take, would you do it?  (Read 3428 times)

cat_with_no_eyes

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For example if he gave you his opinion/advice on the degree which he thinks will be most useful sooner. Would you opt for that degree, regardless of what you thought?

The degree is a science degree btw.

Yes? No? Maybe, and why?


 

Offline rosy

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If I thought he knew what he was talking about in that particular context, I might factor his reasoning into my decision making process, as I might for anyone else who offered me an opinion about something important.

If it related to a choice between degrees in medecine/biomedical-type sciences/straight biological sciences I'd certainly also consider such factors as his age (how long since he was last studying, whether his opinions are up-to-date) and what, if anything, he knew about me, my circumstances, my aptitudes, etc etc (also whether it was considered advice he was giving me or an off-the-cuff comment whilst making conversation when otherwise engaged in, for example, freezing off a wart).
 

Offline tommya300

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For example if he gave you his opinion/advice on the degree which he thinks will be most useful sooner. Would you opt for that degree, regardless of what you thought?

The degree is a science degree btw.

Yes? No? Maybe, and why?
NO!
It all depends on the individuals, my objective!
One persons opinion should be taken into consideration and weighed, with others.
Marketing strategy to find a future job using a projective view and economic and scientific trends  in the industrial job market. Many other things needs to be set in this decision making.
You do need to pay for this education a job is needed, unless you are already wealthy.

e.g. mid 80's
 If you were planning on scientific quality control for aerospace, and advice was given in 1979 you would be disappointed 4 years later. There were huge cutbacks in industry and the first jobs hit were, the ones that were overhead costs non essential to construction. This idea emulated from non scientific jobs, Bean Counter's jobs. What happened was the shuttle disaster.

Future projections of the industrial trend has a domino effect, timing and knowledge of events must apply, if the GP had no knowledge or reasonable projections explaining their opinions than I would place there words at the bottom of the decision making list.

Yes, Rose is right! I did not mention on the fact if the GP inquires into your wants, investigates it in conversation and finds you have a gift in certain areas too.
.
« Last Edit: 14/08/2010 16:20:20 by tommya300 »
 

Offline Green

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Personally, no.

I suppose it would be dependant on the relationship with the doctor, how well they know you and if they know and give you valid information like they would to their own children.

If the degree ties in with relevent interests then it might be worth looking into further.
 

Offline Variola

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It would depend on the GP, they can be great doctors but not good scientists, it would depend on how much they keep up with current research IMO.
 

Offline demografx

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I'm lucky if I can find a GP who really understands medicine, let alone non-medicine areas! No, thanx, doc, I'll seek outside opinions from experts in their respective professions, e.g., career counseling.
 

Offline rosy

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Quote
I'll seek outside opinions from experts in their respective professions, e.g., career counseling.
Really? Goodness.

(Actually, that's a bit unfair.. I've been very impressed by the university careers service in Cambridge. But the careers advice available to a young person choosing a university degree? I'd put about as much faith in the school bus driver, myself.. he knew more about me, and not meaningfully less what university courses I might be interested in than either of the two professional careers advisors I saw as a teenager)

No. Seriously. Do your research. If someone makes a suggestion that sounds interesting, follow it up, whoever they are (even if they're a careers advisor). And don't be afraid to e-mail the contact address for any courses you're interested in if the information available doesn't tell you what you want to know. (Caveat, do make sure you can't answer the question yourself, first... you don't want anyone involved in admissions somewhere you might be going to apply to think "ah, that's the idiot who didn't bother to read the website before asking us questions answered on the front page", on the other hand smart questions won't do you any harm).
 

Offline Ophiolite

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You appear to be making the mistake of believing there may be someone other than yourself who knows what would be best for you. (I am assuming that since you are smart enough to ask for advice you are also smart enough to consider it before forming a view.)
 

Offline demografx

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...he knew more about me, and not meaningfully less what university courses I might be interested in than either of the two professional careers advisors I saw as a teenager...


I see your point. My guidance counselor didn't have the best advice. But neither did a successful uncle. I followed both.

In-depth knowledge and caring of the individual seeking advice are critical.
 

cat_with_no_eyes

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I mean the doc did have a point, he was saying that do a gentics degree. What do you think of that? i'm pretty sure it'll advance soon?

what do you guys think?
 

Offline Variola

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I mean the doc did have a point, he was saying that do a gentics degree. What do you think of that? i'm pretty sure it'll advance soon?

what do you guys think?

That is good advice in that it is an expanding field, but many life sci courses still involve genetics so it would depend on what floats your boat. For example, I study Molecular Medicine, and there are 3 other degrees Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, an for the 1st year practically all our courses were the same. We took a few different options in the 2nd year but it isn't till final year you get to specialise a bit more. Also it is worth remembering that genetics extends to plants and bacteria as well as humans, and much of a general genetics degree will be devoted to that, and to evolution. Pure genetics degrees are becoming less common now because they are being swallowed up on Biomed courses, it is the same stuff being taught just by a different name.  Also if you want to work somewhere like a hospital lab then you would need to check it is an *accredited course.
Have a look at some life sci degree courses, basically anything with biochemistry or genetics will be good to take in that it opens doors for research/jobs. Look at the modules and you will find that most offer a big wedge of genetics in them so you don't just need to do a degree in genetics to what you need.
 

cat_with_no_eyes

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Thanks variola that was a good help, may contact you again :)
 

Offline Variola

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Thanks variola that was a good help, may contact you again :)

You are very welcome :-) If you have any Q's feel free to PM me on here.
 

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