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Author Topic: What drives the rate of evolution?  (Read 2136 times)

Offline kaypep

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What drives the rate of evolution?
« on: 26/09/2010 08:02:25 »
Which of the following situation would evolution be fastest for an interbreeding population?

A high rate of migration or a low rate of migration?

The answer is a high rate of migration.


Is my understanding correct:

High migration -> new alleles introduced frequently -> greater phenotypic difference between individuals -> events such as genetic drift would more likely lead to speciation
« Last Edit: 05/10/2010 09:07:18 by chris »


 

Offline Jolly- Joliver

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What drives the rate of evolution?
« Reply #1 on: 29/03/2011 18:10:36 »
Which of the following situation would evolution be fastest for an interbreeding population?

A high rate of migration or a low rate of migration?

The answer is a high rate of migration.


Is my understanding correct:

High migration -> new alleles introduced frequently -> greater phenotypic difference between individuals -> events such as genetic drift would more likely lead to speciation

Well inbreading is hardly an evolution plus, although you probably do get more mutations.
 

Offline Dasyatis

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What drives the rate of evolution?
« Reply #2 on: 21/04/2011 21:01:10 »
Well inbreading is hardly an evolution plus, although you probably do get more mutations.

The OP said "interbreeding" not "inbreeding". Big difference!

kaypep, your understanding is probably correct. I say probably because the beauty of evolution is its ability to defy outright predictions.  High migration would lead to more opportunities to add or remove alleles in a population, and would directly influence gene flow between migrating populations. But high migration might actually prevent speciation by reducing allopatry (separated populations), but on the same token would increase the chance of a portion of that population suddenly being isolated by chance environmental events (storms, earthquakes, continental drift, etc.)
 

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What drives the rate of evolution?
« Reply #2 on: 21/04/2011 21:01:10 »

 

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