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Author Topic: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?  (Read 107859 times)

Offline Expectant_Philosopher

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #200 on: 21/01/2013 17:12:26 »
Can there be an extra dimensional aspect to the Photon that would solve for entanglement's instantaneous action at a distance?  Bell's Theorem and EPR Paradox ideas localize quantum theory and tell us that the theory of Quantum Mechanics is incomplete.  Time as a relevant dimension is already taken into account.  Could there be another dimension beyond time that connects to all locations in our observable dimensions providing for Newtonian conservation of momentum as the basis for quantum entanglement - with the Photon as the structure of the force?  Then beyond explaining "spooky action at a distance", even the effects of gravity might be thought of as a symptom of the interaction of photons across the "surface" of an extra dimension. 
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #201 on: 22/01/2013 01:57:15 »
It is a big question!

Bell's inequality has been proved. The conclusion is that two photons correlated in their spins from a source are influenced by the state of both detectors at a speed faster than light.

In all experiments, to scramble the information of momentum, the detectors states must be randomized. You could argue that if both photons are initially correlated to both states of the detectors, the defective randomization process could explained the remnant correlation. But the sources of photons have been characterized to some extent, prior to the experiments. But still, you may logically doubt, unless experiments show entanglement when changes in the detectors states occur during the travel of the photons. Which, i think, hasn't been realised...

One more thing. I don't see how an experiment may possibly differentiate causality and retrocausality. All the laws of physics, on which such an experiment would be interpreted, are time reversal symmetric.


« Last Edit: 22/01/2013 03:19:34 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #202 on: 22/01/2013 03:17:35 »
Even time could play the role of the missing dimension...

The Compton frequency of a particle determines its mass and energy. From the big bang of our black ring of origin, the quanta have generally expanded from the Planck mass or Planck time to the particles we observe today. It could be the charge itself that expands leaving only a wave. A particle rest frame is real and is simply a wave curled up on itself. The wave could be extended between all elementary particles and react no faster than the speed of light. A classical field theory.

But if entanglement faster than light is proved, time and space are somehow two distinct sets of dimensions. So you could have a wave in space reacting in no time. It could be space itself. No fifth dimension, no point charge. The uncertainty principle may hide the fact that the charge is in fact a localized wave being measured by localized waves...

We are left with the possible necessity of higher dimensions to explain more complex sytems. I must say i like to see the charge as beeing a fifth dimension. But is it necessary?
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #203 on: 30/01/2013 03:40:45 »
Entanglement faster than light:
http://phys.org/news/2013-01-einstein-entanglement-quantum-erasure-deconstructs.html

http://www.pnas.org/content/110/4/1221.full

Special Relativity with faster than light correlations (approximated or equal to instantaneity) involving information exchanges without energy exchange. There is quantizations of the entanglement states, each representing the correlation of the wave-particle being measured with another particle. This is what i call the level of entanglement. If the photon is made of two charges, the simplest solution give a maximum level without energy exchange of 25% between two photons (unless they are entangled by the strong force). Experimentally to obtain such a level, all photons measured would have to stay entangled at the first level all along the paths.

Multiverse? It is not necessary at all...
http://harpers.org/archive/2011/12/the-accidental-universe/1/
« Last Edit: 30/01/2013 03:49:57 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #204 on: 06/02/2013 01:50:52 »
Solitons? Only local actions?

http://arxiv.org/abs/1301.7351
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #205 on: 05/03/2013 04:00:53 »
Any charge has the velocity of light from any inertial frame of reference. A reference frame being a circle and not a singularity, we have uncertainty on distance which is equivalent to uncertainty in time...


Some precisions on spin entanglement:

We have an electron with two halves of a minus charge entangled at 100% by the strong force. Then, this electron is entangled with the rest of the universe at a 100% level. The rest of the universe determine entirely its spin. It is all relative. The electron is entangled at 50% on its left charge and 50% on its right charge.

We have a production of an electron and positron pair from two gamma rays by an half charge exchange. At the pair creation both particles are entangled together at a 50% level, 25% from each of its half charges. Then the electron and the positron are entangled at a 50% level with the rest of the universe.

Experimentally, you can only measure a finite system of particles. There is always parallel connections to the rest of the universe with all charges of a closed system. The first unknown is the spin direction contribution from the outside system which can only be reduced to a probability. The other unknown is the entanglement level contribution which can be known if we know all specific relations of the closed system. At the start of the experiment, all half charges have already a relation with all other half charges of the system. Most relations may be negligeable or not. The relation decrease has 1/2^n.

Four main examples of highly entangled systems are atoms, molecules, lasers and crystals (magnets, human beings, stars, galaxies...).


News:
It says it all, almost. It may be a proof of GR but not GR as generally understood for sure (what is the source of Xrays). It is just a question of time before it will be shown that all black holes rotate at the speed of light.
http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2013/feb/27/black-hole-found-spinning-near-the-relativistic-limit

How can this be without electric charge exchanges? Remarkably, it is for mesons (two quarks) having a total charge of zero...
http://phys.org/news/2013-03-lhc-team-instance-d-mesons-oscillating.html

About the black hole article, it seems all reporters have not understood that the x-rays don't come from the accretion disc but they are reflected from it, as explained by the astrophysicists participating to this research.
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/29607590

« Last Edit: 11/03/2013 19:45:26 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #206 on: 23/03/2013 06:38:24 »
Forget Inflation! 

Anisotropy results from Planck mission:
http://arxiv.org/abs/1303.5083
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #207 on: 27/03/2013 02:02:48 »
The standard cosmological model was based on isotropy and homogeneity of the universe from limited observations. Now, we have proofs that it is not homogeneous (dark energy) nor isotropic. Anyone saying there is proofs that there is no center to the big bang is lowering his credibility.

When astronomers find out about dark energy, there were suprised because they were expecting a slow down of the expansion due to gravity, not an acceleration.

If you change your point of view and suppose a center, dark energy suddenly appears as a deceleration...!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

So why the visible universe seems almost isotropic and homogeneous then?

Inertia is mediated by photons...
« Last Edit: 27/03/2013 03:35:57 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #208 on: 01/04/2013 21:37:31 »
http://spaceinimages.esa.int/Images/2013/03/Planck_enhanced_anomalies

What can i say? Amazing!!! Thanks to Planck mission!!!
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #209 on: 03/04/2013 21:11:36 »
Why gravitational-wave interferometer like LIGO will never get positive results?

There is no proper expansion of space and no matter with relative speed higher than the speed of light. Using one laser source and one clock, it is therefore impossible to detect gravitational waves. The variations in time are compensated by the variations in length, locally.

The Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect is a myth, if I am correct, evidently. A photon passing through a gravitational well will only be affected by it locally. If there is no interaction locally with matter, there is no effect on the photon other than on its path.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sachs%E2%80%93Wolfe_effect
« Last Edit: 03/04/2013 23:04:54 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #210 on: 03/04/2013 21:27:35 »
Time is of the essence

Time is motion, motion is energy. No energy, no time, no space, nothing.

Either, we are in a simulation (something from nothing) or there is a cyclic big bang (something from something)...

One thing is sure, time is eternal...

In a cyclic big bang model, space may or may not be infinite. It could still be closed.

The first question is: Is there only one bang or multiple bangs in the universe?

My answers on that are speculatives, i must admit.

If the center of our big bang is the cold spot, the universe is much older than what the current model indicates. It is possible that there was an earlier epoch full of supernovae that produced the now dark neutrinos (dark matter).

This would imply that the further we look in time, the higher the density of supernovae should be observed, unless it decreased sharply in time at a very early epoch. Anyway, it doesn't seem to be the case. So I guess there is multiple big bangs based on that, explaining dark matter, but there is many holes that you can fill with other theories...

Or maybe, the dark neutrinos originate from the annihilation of matter-antimatter shortly after the big bang...?


« Last Edit: 23/04/2013 23:34:17 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #211 on: 06/04/2013 00:14:02 »
Lee Smolin lecture on a possible model for Quantum foundations:

http://pirsa.org/13020146/
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #212 on: 08/04/2013 21:54:55 »
About the origin of the Schrodinger's equation:

http://phys.org/news/2013-04-schrodinger-equation.html

Unfortunately, i haven't read the original paper.

Motion is momentum through time. The photon is the most elementary particle.

Does the photon have a thickness?

The universe is advancing through time, frame by frame, following a suite of events. At our theoretical level of knowledge, we can perceive that space and time are very distinct. We may find the solution connecting these events at the level of the elementary particles.

Entanglement seems to demonstrate that there is a spatial connection faster than light and possibly instantaneous... But, for me, causality is in energy relations, thus limited by the speed of light. Space may still changes instantaneously to changes in energy.

« Last Edit: 23/04/2013 23:33:31 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #213 on: 25/04/2013 08:05:47 »
Another very interesting presentation by Lee Smolin:

http://pirsa.org/displayFlash.php?id=13040103

By the end you should be surprised...


On another note, does dark matter is the missing antimatter?
http://phys.org/news/2013-04-lhcb-matter-antimatter-
http://arxiv.org/abs/1304.6173ml


Next, the mass of the electron neutrino and the value of the Weak Interaction coupling constant.

Neutrino mass =  0.209634 eV
Weak coupling constant = 4.10244 x10e-7

http://wwwphy.princeton.edu/borexino/nu-mass.html


« Last Edit: 25/04/2013 08:20:14 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #214 on: 28/04/2013 04:56:07 »
How about an engine powered by dark matter?

 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #215 on: 07/05/2013 07:40:07 »
This seems to show a center to our big bang. The alleged variation of the fine structure constant has an axis aligned with the Cold Spot!

http://arxiv.org/abs/1202.4758

In my opinion, it is due to anisotropy of the relative velocities and gravity potentials of the absorption clouds...
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #216 on: 09/05/2013 07:53:54 »
GR from SR with a set of flat spaces

Measurements have demonstrated that space is flat within the experimental uncertainties. Why?

According to the current cosmological model, space was already flat shortly after the big bang.

On the other hand, entanglement may be explained by negative time signaling or by instantaneous connections.

Let’s consider only instantaneity.

The concept of instantaneous connections across the entire universe is not much in conflict with GR, contrary to what you might think of. It is only conflicting with the concept of space-time being a continuous 3D entity causing the gravitational effect. Other than that, I don’t see any problem. The singularity appearance from GR equations just indicates that these equations are incomplete. QM clearly shows that the universe is made of discrete elements. Let’s go back to instantaneity. But where comes from gravity in SR?

All elementary particles (EPs) of the universe are unique rest frames. All these rest frames advance in time, being instantaneously synchronized. The basic unit of time is the time it takes for a photon to generate a relative space of one minimal Planck wavelength corresponding to the maximal relative mass, the Planck mass, therefore 2*pi*TP .

Remember that all states of an EP are determined by all other EPs of the universe by entanglement (this is why an electron appears to be spherical at rest; when considered disconnected, its spin is entirely unknown). Entanglement is relativity.

Now, let us consider the universe from the point of view of an elementary particle (or a rest frame):

The universe is a flow of static space frames. Static space implies no motion within the frame and it also implies a flat space…

A static space is a Euclidean space; no motion = Newton’s law. Thus the universe is composed of a unique set of Euclidean spaces, one space for each EP. Time is real and primordial, space is emergent if finite (it doesn’t mean unreal; it depends on your definition of reality).  If space is infinite, then it is primordial, but energy must also be infinite. Time is necessarily endless and it has no beginning.

The curvature is not in space, it is in discrete space-times (the EPs, now including the photons). Curvature and momentum are the properties of these discrete space-times. It is what I would call matter-wave or our perception of reality. You may only perceive reality over time… When you dream, your brain generates a virtual space in real time… :o) But regarding time, it is an assumption to get something real and primordial...

Photons have +1/2-1/2=0 intrinsic curvature (no rest frame). The real breakthrough is in the orthogonality of momentum and time. Momentum is space over time and gravity is time over space. This is my solution to smoothly include gravity in SR agreeing with QM.

The charge has always a velocity of light from the rest frame of any EPs. At rest, it forms a circle and the solution is Newtonian. Relativity is in motion; it is the relations of the causal path between the sets of static frames which represent the universe.

Energy is in motion, therefore, there is no elementary particle having a spin of zero: the Higgs, if real, cannot be elementary if it possesses a spin of zero, because it would imply a mass of zero and zero intrinsic energy. If the Higgs has a spin zero, it must have zero mass and it is truly unreal (virtual), then, when a Higgs is detected, the primordial energetic vibrations produced must be two photons with opposite spins.

Next, GR explained from SR; the solution is in the relativistic components of the Doppler Effect. Then the foundations will be laid for my calculation of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron; and this lead me to the possible mass of the neutrino (certainly directly linked to it, and probably it is, from my point of view).

Note 1:If space is finite, instantaneity is not necessary. The maximum speed necessary would be the size of the universe divided by 2*pi*TP.

Note 2: A black ring does not absorb nor radiate thermal photons, but only reflects them. There can't be no absorption nor radiation at the minimal relative length, how could it be... only in discrete quanta of Planck mass...
 
« Last Edit: 10/05/2013 20:40:16 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #217 on: 11/05/2013 21:13:11 »
Time has a direction in space.

There is no negative energy but there is time vectors in opposite direction in space.

Time is energy.

Energy quanta are confined to a timeline.

There is no vacuum energy.

There is no flow of space at an event horizon or anywhere in the universe.

Frame dragging is not caused by a pervasive spacetime, its causes are relativity of mass and relativity of time. Therefore frame dragging is not a good expression.

http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2013/05/bizarre-state-of-matter-discovered-at-core-of-a-neutron-star-weekend-feature.html#more

This is something Ernst Reichenbächer seems to have understood. Unfortunately, i don't speak german...
« Last Edit: 11/05/2013 21:18:53 by CPT ArkAngel »
 


Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #219 on: 26/05/2013 19:52:12 »
[b]Gravitons and Casimir effect[/b]

I had an idea of how gravity might be mediated.

Gravity may be mediated by photons exchanged between elementary particles (the transverse component of the photon that generates the particle). Each photon having one wavelength between each particles. We can call it a photon if it is limited by the speed of light. In the contrary, as I suspect, we could call it a graviton. I suggest a model of graviton having a variable speed but a fixed delay of the Planck time. Gravity is a reciprocal relation.

It would explain the Casimir effect. For gravity, there is no cut off and it increases at shorter distances. Inertial push is produced by quantized photons at the speed of light (the longitudinal component). Only the photons having a shorter wavelength than the distance between the planes can contribute to the push. Therefore, there is a cut off...
« Last Edit: 26/05/2013 19:54:04 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Offline BlueHorizon

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #221 on: 09/06/2013 01:45:54 »
Time is of the essence


One thing is sure, time is eternal...

CPT AA what extactly is meant by this in scientific discussion?
(1) Time has no end?
(2) Time had no beginning?
(3) Both the above?

Given some understandings of the concept of "time" ... to say "time had a beginning" is a logical contradiction.
That isn't the same as saying the actual reality (as opposed to the concept of it) is eternal.

Is it ever correct to say "there was a time when there was no time"?

 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #222 on: 11/06/2013 23:24:00 »
Energy is conserved. We are made of energy. Everything you can feel is made out of energy. If energy is made out of time, time must be eternal. You can't stop motion, you can't stop time. Therefore there was no beginning and there will be no end...

A black ring has a time relation to other black rings. A photon experiences time in a 2-dimensional world (maybe it has a fixed thickness in the direction of motion).

There is still the possibility that we live in a simulated world which had a beginning, but then, there is necessarily an underworld without a beginning. There can't be an infinite sequence of simulations inside simulations, because a simulation has necessarily a beginning...

But maybe, only maybe, the real question is : who wants to live forever...?

I do...
« Last Edit: 11/06/2013 23:39:28 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #223 on: 21/08/2013 09:15:17 »
The fear of death and its link to evolution. Is it accidental or not? That was my question... :o)

Soon I will post my calculation of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron as an attached pdf. It won't be my final version but people who understand my theory will decode it easily. At last, I have the perfect prediction...

Important articles by Lee Smolin and Marina Cortês related to my theory:
http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.6167
http://arxiv.org/abs/1308.2206

Holographic principle necessary?
http://arxiv.org/abs/1308.1977
« Last Edit: 21/08/2013 17:14:17 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
« Reply #224 on: 03/09/2013 23:06:26 »

"Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts."   Feynman (1968)

first read this
http://www.lassp.cornell.edu/sethna/Cracks/QED.html

My calculation of the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the neutrino mass is in attached secured pdf file.
« Last Edit: 19/10/2013 00:09:33 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

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Re: Could the photon be the sole elementary particle?
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