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Offline Gabe12321

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« on: 19/10/2010 18:36:28 »
I am doing a project for school and was wondering if anyone knows a equation to find out how much processing power a quantum processor will have. I know that a 30 qbit processor would be 10 terahertz and was wondering out how to find out for less qbits. Any help would be appreciated.


 

Offline JP

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #1 on: 19/10/2010 23:05:08 »
Where do you get the number of 30 qbit = 10 terahertz?  Since they don't exist yet, I thought that the clock speeds would be unknown, and depend on the engineering of the system.  The main advantage, I thought, was that quantum computers could take many less operations to solve certain kinds of problems.
 

Offline Geezer

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #2 on: 20/10/2010 03:04:15 »
As JP points out, they are likely to be very different animals, if they ever show up.

I suspect that anyone who is already trying to compare them with current technology in terms of MegaFlops, MungaFlips, DingleHertz or GiggleWicks knoweth naught of which they speak.
 

Offline graham.d

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #3 on: 21/10/2010 16:08:35 »
The superposition of quantum states means that you can have massively parallel computing without the massive mounts of hardware. It is hard to compare such a machine with conventional computing. Quantum computers would be excellent at solving particular types of problems such as huge database searches - really anything that involves a lot of possible routes to just a few potential solutions. Conventional computers have to try each combination of input data sequentially to see if a solution emerges.

 

Offline imatfaal

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #4 on: 21/10/2010 16:40:48 »
To backup Gabe, I think I have seen estimates of quantum computer speed in my reading around p v np and other difficult questions in maths.  I am sure I have seen time comparison estimates for a massively parallel q-computer for non-polynomial time problems as a fraction/function of the linear approach of a x giga-flop semi-conductor super-computer.  I think these are highly suspicious but they are out there.  Will dig out some examples. 

well what I read does turn out to be a bit dodgy "There is a common misconception that quantum computers can solve NP-complete problems in polynomial time. That is not known to be true, and is generally suspected to be false."

But others would disagree and say that NP-cpmplet problems will be solvable in polynomial time by q-computers. "In complexity theory, a famous unsolved problem is whether NP is equal to P or not. In this paper, we discuss this aspect in SAT (satisfiability) problem, and it is shown that SAT can be solved in polynomial time by means of a quantum algorithm if the superposition of two orthogonal vectors |0> and |1> prepared is detected physically." ]

Sorry Guys - I seem to have wandered totally off track

« Last Edit: 21/10/2010 16:51:43 by imatfaal »
 

Offline Geezer

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #5 on: 21/10/2010 17:47:02 »
Sorry Guys - I seem to have wandered totally off track


I don't think so. That's good information.
 

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How fast will quantum processors be?
« Reply #5 on: 21/10/2010 17:47:02 »

 

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