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Author Topic: Are billboards that attract more attention REALLY a good idea?  (Read 6247 times)

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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Considering that billboards are primarily in places likely to been seen by people in cars is it really a good idea to try harder to attract attention? Does anyone know how many accidents are caused by flashy billboards?

In the same issue, I don't know if it's done everywhere but lights for bicycles very often have flashing, rather than steady taillights. This is done primarily so drivers at night can distinguish them from motor bikes, but could flickering lights on all vehicles help them to be seen?

A common accident here involving police will have a drunk driver slamming into a police car with it's emergency lights flashing while the cop car is stopped behind a traffic violator.  I know it has something to do with the drunk driver being attracted by the flashing lights but I don't know why.


 

Offline rosy

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Considering that billboards are primarily in places likely to been seen by people in cars is it really a good idea to try harder to attract attention?
Good for whom? The advertisers? Almost certainly.
The drivers? Even if they're not distracted from the road they're probably having their pockets picked if their attention is being called to the advertising hoarding sufficiently that it changes their buying habits: big advertising budget =/= good value. So probably not good for the drivers.

Apart from that... it might depend on the nature of the flashing. If it's fairly slow I'd guess that would be less distracting than fairly high speed flashing, but that's just from what I feel about my own responses, not any real data.

The flashing bicycle lights... as a driver, I hate them. They attract my attention to the cyclist at the expense of all the other stuff that's going on amongst the traffic, such as the pedestrians, who are always less visible (than a lit cyclist) and frequently more unpredictable (especially after about 10 at night). The idea that it's supposed to distinguish them from motorbikes strikes me as ludicrous, since the common form of flashing bike light here (in the UK, or at least in Cambridge) is much, much dimmer than any legal motorbike light.. distinguishing push-cycles from motorcycles isn't even particularly important, certainly on city roads where push bikes do anything between about 4 and about 25 mph, depending on the road, and the legal limit for all traffic is 30.
 

Offline maffsolo

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Catchy billboard advertisements are a distraction. If it is that catchy to the eye usually can not be read fast enough and you might go out of your way to read it. Television programming Videos on the Dumbest drivers...

Once I seen a New car dealer ad that had a picture of a car with real working headlights.
It was so catchy I forgot what dealer and what brand of car, but I remembered the style of the ad.

Bicycles and scooters or slow top speed vehicles, should be banned from night driving on motor car roads. Bright illuminating clothing should be as mandatory as a bicycle helmet passive reflectors should be mounted on the rotating parts demonstrating erratic flashing not a constant timed hypnotic flashing.

They should face traffic as they ride so you and them can not unintentionally sneak up on each other. How many times on a narrow stretch of road, following a cyclist, you beep to warn them your intent to pass, you see a shiver of the bike as if they were surprised with a little fright.
If you are facing each other on the same side of the road this is less likely to happen.

That is my views no data to back it up

« Last Edit: 21/10/2010 18:40:01 by maffsolo »
 

Offline rosy

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Bicycles and scooters or slow top speed vehicles, should be banned from night driving on motor car roads. Bright illuminating clothing should be as mandatory as a bicycle helmet passive reflectors should be mounted on the rotating parts demonstrating erratic flashing not a constant timed hypnotic flashing.

Jeez. "Motor car roads"?? What a stupid thing to say.

They're not "motor car roads", they're everyone's roads. Just because a car can do 50 mph doesn't mean it has an intrinsic right to do so under all circumstances, and if a motorist can't slow sufficiently when they see a properly lit bicycle ahead then they are going too fast (if it weren't a cyclist it could be a pedestrian crossing the road, escaped livestock, you name it).

Cyclists have every right to be on the roads when they want to be. I don't know where you're based, but in this country we haven't the space on the roads, particularly in the cities, for all the people who cycle to drive their cars all the time! And cycling into the flow of the traffic? I've rarely heard anything so stupid. Anyone who cycles to get around does at least 10 mph and often nearer 20. That's not something you want approaching you if you're already doing 30 on a crowded street!

Beeping at cyclists to signal your intent to pass? Where are you from? Is that normal behaviour? It wouldn't be acceptable here. As a motorist, you have no more right to be on the road than the cyclist does, and if there's no-where convenient to pass, or you have reason to think they don't know you're there, you should be waiting for an opportunity when you could pass safely. If you beeped at me to warn me of your intent to pass I'd assume you were acting out of aggression and quite likely about to pull over infront of me and beat me up (it happened to my dad..).

I am motorist, cyclist and pedestrian at different times, I have no axe to grind. I wish the police had more time to deal with stupid, irresponsible cyclists who ride without lights, or the wrong way on one-way streets, or drunk, or as if they've never been on a bike before (goodness there are enough of them in Cambridge)... but that doesn't mean I don't also think that some drivers need to get over the delusion that they have the right to travel at the legal speed limit and not an mph slower, and that some pedestrians really need to look where they're going before they walk off the pavement and into the path of an oncoming bike.
 

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