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Author Topic: Why am I immune to motion sickness?  (Read 12342 times)

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
« on: 23/10/2010 06:39:15 »
I have never had a problem with motion sickness. I can even read while riding (but I never do it when driving) in a car on twisted mountain roads. A good friend of mine is badly affected by motion sickness. It even makes her ill to see me reading while riding.

I wonder why some people seem immune to motion sickness while others are not. One environmental difference I had growing up. My father was a pilot and owned a share in a private plane. I grew up close to San Fransisco, Ca while his parents lived in Eugene, Or. (go Ducks!!!) We almost always flew up (3 hours vs 10 driving) and to entertain us dad would sometimes fly parabolas, giving us brief periods of 0 gravity, which is quite a lot of fun. Could this exposure to strange motion be a contributing factor?

Once while driving on a mountain road with my friend, she became quite ill, but I stopped before she got sick and had her drive. This made her feel much better. I know it works (it's why I offered to let her drive) but I don't know why. Is it because she had to concentrate on driving and not think about being sick? If that's the case is motion sickness psychosomatic?


 

Offline Bad_Bonez

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
« Reply #1 on: 26/10/2010 19:04:22 »
From the little I understand about motion siclness, I believe it is all connected to ballance.  Usually the eyes and ears work together to control balance, so if somepeople read whilst moving, the brain gets mixed messages, stationary from the eyes and movement from the ears, it is these mixed messages that cause the nausea.  When the person is actually in control of the vehicle the eyes and ears are working together so no nausea.  Just sitting in the passenger seat and looking streight ahead should have the same result.  As to why some people do not experience motion sickness, I can only guess that the brain has adapted, or has a greater capasity for mixed messaging.
 

Offline FuzzyUK

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
« Reply #2 on: 26/10/2010 20:24:35 »
The person who is least sick in a car is the driver because they are able to anticipate the movements of the vehicle whilst they have control of the wheel. Take the wheel control away and nausea and motion sickness manifest.
 

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
« Reply #3 on: 02/11/2010 23:19:54 »
From the little I understand about motion siclness, I believe it is all connected to ballance.  Usually the eyes and ears work together to control balance, so if somepeople read whilst moving, the brain gets mixed messages.

This is interesting... Do people who are blind (completely blind rather than just very poor vision) and have no memory of sight suffer from motion sickness? Would wearing a blindfold help (assuming you're not the driver)?


As to why some people do not experience motion sickness, I can only guess that the brain has adapted, or has a greater capasity for mixed messaging.

So people why don't suffer from MS have more brain capacity and are thus smarter?? ::)
« Last Edit: 02/11/2010 23:22:40 by Eric A. Taylor »
 

Offline Bad_Bonez

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
« Reply #4 on: 03/11/2010 10:13:31 »
Quote
This is interesting... Do people who are blind (completely blind rather than just very poor vision) and have no memory of sight suffer from motion sickness? Would wearing a blindfold help (assuming you're not the driver)?
  Very good question.  I have found that when I get motion sickness in a car, closing my eyes does help. 

Quote
So people why don't suffer from MS have more brain capacity and are thus smarter?? roll eyes
  Capacity within the brain to perform certain tasks, consciously or subconsciously doesn't indicate that a person is smarter.  How smart a person is can be very difficult to meassure, and very contraversal. :-X
 

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
« Reply #5 on: 03/11/2010 22:56:55 »
Quote
This is interesting... Do people who are blind (completely blind rather than just very poor vision) and have no memory of sight suffer from motion sickness? Would wearing a blindfold help (assuming you're not the driver)?
  Very good question.  I have found that when I get motion sickness in a car, closing my eyes does help. 

Quote
So people why don't suffer from MS have more brain capacity and are thus smarter?? roll eyes
  Capacity within the brain to perform certain tasks, consciously or subconsciously doesn't indicate that a person is smarter.  How smart a person is can be very difficult to meassure, and very contraversal. :-X

Too true. I knew a guy with Down's syndrome. He could not live independently. Had trouble dressing himself but could do the most amazing things with math. He loved solving math problems even complex calculus something that has always stumped me. It's been said that Einstein was considered stupid as a kid, but I've read recently that that is an urban legend. It's true he annoyed his teachers because he was outspoken and opinionated, and because he was quite a lot smarter than they were.
 

Offline Jessica H

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
« Reply #6 on: 05/11/2010 00:51:14 »
I would classify myself as motion-sick prone because I get really sick sometimes on planes with a lot of turbulance or on twisty roads. But never on boats, even once when it was really swaying & lots of people were sick.  Do you think this is just chance or is seasickness different somehow?

The blind question is interesting. Ive shut my eyes before and it didn't help!
 

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
« Reply #7 on: 16/12/2010 03:51:58 »
I would classify myself as motion-sick prone because I get really sick sometimes on planes with a lot of turbulance or on twisty roads. But never on boats, even once when it was really swaying & lots of people were sick.  Do you think this is just chance or is seasickness different somehow?

The blind question is interesting. Ive shut my eyes before and it didn't help!

I've also heard that motion sickness can be contagious. But is this really true, or is it a case of someone who is already feeling ill hearing someone throw up, or smelling vomit can induce sickness. I once threw up on my nephew when changing his diapers. He thought it was funny at the time. I only go9t a little on him. Later he got his revenge by waiting to pee until I had his diaper off.
 

Offline The Scientist

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
« Reply #8 on: 24/12/2010 02:05:03 »
Hmm, is this related to the mental mind?
 

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Why am I immune to motion sickness?
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