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Author Topic: Does antimatter exist in its own "anti-universe"?  (Read 4818 times)

Avery Bailey

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Avery Bailey  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Does antimatter exist in its own "anti-universe" or does it only exist in our physical universe in small amounts?

Thanks, Avery.

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 23/10/2010 08:30:05 by _system »


 

Offline syhprum

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Does antimatter exist in its own
« Reply #1 on: 23/10/2010 11:49:10 »
If a multiplicity of universes exist there could be no communication between them so the question cannot be answered, there is no indication that islands of anti matter exist within our universe.
 

Offline peppercorn

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Does antimatter exist in its own
« Reply #2 on: 23/10/2010 12:37:39 »
If a multiplicity of universes exist there could be no communication between them so the question cannot be answered.

Can we rule out that it can never be answered?
 

Offline granpa

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Does antimatter exist in its own
« Reply #3 on: 23/10/2010 18:55:31 »
how would the matter that made our universe become separated from the antimatter that made the antimatter universe
 

Offline maffsolo

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Does antimatter exist in its own
« Reply #4 on: 23/10/2010 23:55:43 »
Sounds like a title phrase I heard a  more than once
A Pair of Ducks  by Ike Quake U Up 
 

Offline Bill S

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« Reply #5 on: 24/10/2010 02:13:50 »
Quote from: granpa
how would the matter that made our universe become separated from the antimatter that made the antimatter universe

It seems unlikely that separation would be an issue, if they had ever been together they would, surely, have annihilated each other.
 

Offline syhprum

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« Reply #6 on: 26/10/2010 20:15:19 »
"how would the matter that made our universe become separated from the antimatter that made the antimatter universe"
That question would easily be answered by those who believe antimatter equates with anti gravity which I don't.
Correction I see the correspondent talks about whole universes created of matter and antimatter as I have previously stated I don't believe any communication is possible between multiverses this applies to both electromagnetic radiation and Gravitons   

« Last Edit: 26/10/2010 20:21:12 by syhprum »
 

Offline Bill S

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Does antimatter exist in its own
« Reply #7 on: 26/10/2010 22:49:10 »
Quote from: syhprum
I don't believe any communication is possible between multiverses

David Deutsch (The Fabric of Reality) does not agree with this entirely.  E.g. in the double slit experiment, when sending single photons through the setup, and finding that, provided there is no observation made of the passage of each photon, an interference pattern results which, with time, builds up into a pattern that is indistinguishable from that produced by continuous light passing through the same slits. Deutsch maintains that the interference is supplied by (shadow) photons from other universes.

I baulk somewhat at this, but, as you would expect of Deutsch, he does make quite a good argument.    
 

Offline Farsight

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Does antimatter exist in its own
« Reply #8 on: 27/10/2010 00:53:12 »
Not good enough. He's been advocating the multiverse since 1985 now. That's 25 years, and it still remains unsupported by supporting evidence. 
 

Offline Bill S

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« Reply #9 on: 27/10/2010 17:58:48 »
Quote from: Farsight
Not good enough. He's been advocating the multiverse since 1985 now. That's 25 years, and it still remains unsupported by supporting evidence.

Are you saying that the multiverse is not an article of faith? Apostate!!  Next you will be casting doubt on string theory.  Is nothing sacred?

Seriously, though, what about an infinite cosmos, in which our Universe is embedded, and which we are unable to observe because we are constrained to view the world in the 4D of spacetime? 
 

Offline Vereava

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« Reply #10 on: 30/10/2010 09:34:08 »
Antimatter is an extension to the concept of the antiparticle to matter. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antimatter [nofollow])

For example, a positron is considered an antiparticle of an electron. A photon collides with an electron, creating what is called an annihilation. Now, the diagram shows photons moving backwards through time which suggests that they collide with the electron, but from what I understand (on a personal, futile level) is that it is the other way around.

Example using a Feynman diagram:



I can't draw. Anyway, basically what this says is that, the electron (the darker lines) are moving forward in time when their arrow is pointing up. A photon moving 'backwards' through time (notice how it stays in one spot in space) collides with the electron, sending it backwards in time (basically, it loops, allowing it to feel out it's path like in the double slit experiment). The positron then collides (hopefully!) with another photon, which causes it's spin to reverse again, causing it to land on a new more appropriate path.


Feel free to ask questions to clarify this post, it seems pretty solid to me but I don't mind editing to help make it more understandable.. Thanks
« Last Edit: 30/10/2010 19:41:07 by Vereava »
 

Offline Bill S

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« Reply #11 on: 30/10/2010 16:56:40 »
Quote from: vereava
a photon is considered an antiparticle of an electron

I thought the positron was considered the antiparticle of the electron. Have I missed something?
 

Offline Vereava

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« Reply #12 on: 30/10/2010 19:19:28 »
Quote from: vereava
a photon is considered an antiparticle of an electron

I thought the positron was considered the antiparticle of the electron. Have I missed something?

Yes, you're correct. The positron is actually in my diagram, I made a crucial error. When the electron is moving back through time, it has a positive charge (I drew it with a negative charge.)

Here is a video showing positrons in a cloud chamber


This is our universe. I guess what I was trying to say is that antimatter is only a result of annihilation. You can still see antimatter, if only for a few seconds.

Watch this video as well, it explains the double slit experiment.

 

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« Reply #12 on: 30/10/2010 19:19:28 »

 

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