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Offline Bengt

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Gravity and Strong Force
« on: 30/10/2010 12:38:56 »
     Gravity and Strong Force.

     Computer simulations support the hypothesis that Gravity and Strong Force are caused by complex composite electrostatic forces.

Gravity is caused by dipole formation in form of eccentric elongation of electron orbits around atom nuclei plus charge posturing of protons and neutrons in the nuclei.

Strong Force is caused by charge posturing and ES forces between quarks in protons and neutrons.

According to this hypothesis the universe is ruled by electrostatic and electromagnetic forces. The forces of Gravity and Strong Force are simply complex composite ES forces.
As a result, the imaginary particles called Gravitons and Gluons, the existence of which have never been verified or observed, are no longer required to explain Gravity or Strong Force.

     The full story of this hypothesis can be found at http://www.dipole.se 
« Last Edit: 30/10/2010 12:44:22 by Bengt »


 

Offline questioner

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Gravity and Strong Force
« Reply #1 on: 14/11/2010 00:06:49 »
You seem describe a possible result of gravity in the way it affects atoms but I can't see the cause.
 

Offline Bengt

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« Reply #2 on: 14/11/2010 00:21:26 »
Hi,
I'm describing the cause of gravity, how it starts in the subatomic world and how it affects atoms, molecules, bodies and everything in the universe.
Bengt
 

Offline questioner

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« Reply #3 on: 14/11/2010 11:21:02 »
If it is an electron in an elongated orbit moving at various speeds that imparts the force of gravity on that atom. I believe it is a signal that imparts a force on this electron. It would seem to be some kind of radiation being emitted from the centre of every planet, moon and star. As yet not duplicated by mankind. If it were an electrostatic force however complex couldn't it be influenced by manmade electrostatic forces?
 

Offline Bengt

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« Reply #4 on: 14/11/2010 12:43:59 »
Gravity is the result of polarization of subatomic energies which from the outside look like electric charge. Gravity is therefore a special and complex case of Coulombs law. When body velocities are low the bulk of the atomic energies look like mass while resting as subatomic energies in form of electric charge.

Nothing prevents you from adding man made electrostatic forces between bodies by manipulating the overall electrostatic charge of the bodies, for example by rubbing electrons off one or adding to the other.
The atmosphere and the weather is a good example of this. But as we know superficial electrostatic imbalances tend to even themselves out in the long run.

For details about Gravity and Strong Force see http://www.dipole.se
« Last Edit: 14/11/2010 14:51:52 by Bengt »
 

Offline questioner

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Gravity and Strong Force
« Reply #5 on: 14/11/2010 13:33:11 »
if you can get it to work fly over and see me in your UFO.
 

Offline Bengt

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Gravity and Strong Force
« Reply #6 on: 14/11/2010 15:04:12 »
Thank you for your interest. Keep learning and keep your questions and comments real.
Bengt
 

Offline yor_on

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Gravity and Strong Force
« Reply #7 on: 03/12/2010 21:13:14 »
I'm sorry Bengt, it seems that you put quite some effort into your hypothesis. questioner is a little to hasty there I think. Why don't you present it here in parts and see what the response might be? But, start with the absolute basics, and why you started to think like you did, and let's see if we can follow your thoughts.

You're not the only one thinking of a 'electromagnetic' universe I think, and it might be that you will get some cool responses to your thoughts. But, begin at the bare basics, not with the finale :)so we can follow your logic.
 

Offline Bengt

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Gravity and Strong Force
« Reply #8 on: 06/12/2010 19:13:11 »
Once upon a time,
there was a young neutron who got lost, very lost. He found himself floating freely in a seemingly empty universe. He looked around and saw nothing, absolutely nothing. As he floated in bewilderment he noticed that his tummy was churning. He went with it. What choice did he have. His tummy slowly but surely turned him around. After a while it settled for what seemed to be a specific direction. He relaxed, leaned back and closed his eyes. This wasn't bad; being free. He was so used to being a small part of a bigger... He sat up abruptly feeling wary. Was he accelerating, or was he just imagining things?

To be continued.
Bengt   
 

Offline Bengt

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« Reply #9 on: 07/12/2010 17:09:25 »
Neutron boy, continued
The question whether he was acceleration was interrupted by the sensation that he thought he saw something on the horizon; a very small speck. A feeling of deja-vu swept over him. He remembered an incident when he was very, very young. He squinted to see a bit better. What was that? Well, it didn't seem to be anything dramatic so neutron boy relaxed, and fell asleep. When he woke up he had no idea how long he had been sleeping. He opened his eyes and looked straight ahead. Now he knew what that little speck had been. It was a neutron girl. He knew he was a neutron and neutrons were not supposed to have any feelings. Actually, they weren't supposed to be boys or girls at all. They were plain neutrons. Feelings were reserved for proton and electron people. But what did they know. He could spot a neutron girl a mile away. As she slowly drifted closer he could feel a bump of desire protruding on his tummy. She looked happy too, because two little bumps were showing on her tummy. The two neutrons finally and gently bumped together. Hi. Hi. She blushed a little.

Neutron gravity, to be continued upon request.
Interactive comments, suggestions and questions welcome.
Bengt 
 

« Last Edit: 09/12/2010 14:15:56 by Bengt »
 

Offline Bengt

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Gravity and Strong Force
« Reply #10 on: 09/12/2010 15:21:27 »
"Hi, pretty girl" said neutron boy.
"Not so fast," answered neutron girl. He could see now that she was a little older than him.
"What makes you think I'm a girl?" she asked.
"Well,,," he hesitated.
"My two bumps," she suggested.
"Yes".
She reached out, grabbed his shoulder and and spun him half around. Neutron boy felt confused. His tummy was acting up again but she held him steady.
"What are you doing?" he asked, but noticed how his voice was changing. He sounded like a girl. He looked at her,,, or it, because it's tummy now had only one bump, and spoke in a mans voice while self now had two bumps and spoke like a girl. Neutron 1 was confused. Neutron 2 was laughing.
"Let me tell you about neutron life," said Neutron 2. N2 told N1 all about the quarks that they both carried in their tummies; The fact that they both have one positively charged up-quark and two negatively charged down-quarks in their bellies. And the fact that a positively charged quark attracts negatively charged quarks but repels other positively charged quarks, and vice versa.
"So even though we are both neutral, like good neutrons should, our quarks can rumble around and arrange themselves so that we attract each other." N1 was catching on.
"Exactly, especially when we get close."
N1 looked thoughtful. "Wait, why don't they rumble around so that we get pushed apart."
"Because the ones that are attracted to something roll to the front, and the ones that are pushed away roll to the back."
"Is that what I was feeling?" asked N1.
"Probably."
N1 thought for a while: "And the ones in front can see each other better,,, so they pull harder,,, so they win!"
"Something like that," confirmed N2.
N1 stuck its tummy out and giggled: "I like it."

The End
Your turn yor_on, or is it Göran
Bengt



     
« Last Edit: 09/12/2010 23:28:18 by Bengt »
 

Offline peppercorn

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Gravity and Strong Force
« Reply #11 on: 09/12/2010 16:40:57 »
Once upon a time,
....

&

....

&

....

I'm sorry? Is it just me, or is all this a little odd ???
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Gravity and Strong Force
« Reply #12 on: 09/12/2010 19:45:07 »
No, it's a lot odd.
 

Offline Bengt

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« Reply #13 on: 09/12/2010 23:22:49 »
"yor_on" asked for it. Read his last entry above.
Bengt
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #14 on: 15/12/2010 13:00:41 »
Thanks Bengt :)
Found me patronizing, did you?

Never mind, it's starting to get interesting :)
Be cool.
 

Offline Bengt

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« Reply #15 on: 15/12/2010 13:58:25 »
Thanks Bengt :)
it's starting to get interesting :)
I'll be happy to discuss Physics, especially Gravity and Strong Force, in case anybody is interested.
Bengt
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #16 on: 15/12/2010 18:04:28 »
You know what it reminds me of?
The Little Prince. Not a bad way of starting a explanation :)

I kind of liked it. Even though I'm not sure how you see quarks attracting each other due to their positions though?

To do so you need to assume a 'canvas' upon where they arrange themselves, right? And then you also have to define them as being 'particles' capable of a defined position as well as some sort of 'force', created by them rearranging their positions in some 3-D space?

Myself I'm not that good at the electro magnetic universe, but I know we have others here that have thought about it.
 

Offline Bengt

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« Reply #17 on: 15/12/2010 20:01:26 »
Neutrons are made up of three quarks. The three quarks hang together like a three leaf clover. In a neutron two of the quark leaves are negatively charged and one is positively charged. The negative leaves each carry a -1/3e elementary charge. The positive leaf carries a +2/3e positive charge. A neutron is therefore neutral because:
2x(-1/3)+1x(+2/3)=0.
We know that a positive charge attracts a negative charge and vice versa. Imagine that you have two of these three leaf clovers. Imagine floating these in water and watch what they do. The positively charged leaf of one clover will attract the two negatively charged leaves of the other clover. The two clovers will slowly turn. The positive leaf of one clover will turn toward the negative leaves of the other clover. As a result of this turning, or posturing, the attraction between the closer parts of the clovers will now dominate over the repulsion between the more distant, backsides of the clovers. The two clovers will then slowly start moving toward each other.
This is Gravity; internal electrical charges posturing and turning toward each other causing otherwise neutral objects to attract each other, like the earth and you.

The example above is a very simple case to illustrate the concept of charge posturing, dipole formation and gravity. The story about Neutron Boy above is another one. 
When you have two real bodies with billions of quarks, neutrons and protons, and you are too big to see any one of them it gets hard to figure out what's going on. That's probably why it took mankind a while.

Bengt
 
« Last Edit: 15/12/2010 20:15:59 by Bengt »
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #18 on: 15/12/2010 20:38:51 »
I've read a little about quarks, both QED (Quantum Electro Dynamics) and QDC (Quantum Chromo Dynamics) use it.

There, as I understands it, the idea of ‘quarks’ and ‘gluon's’ are used to describe some fundamental ‘discrete events/particles’ where they, quarks and gluon's can interact and are described in form of colors. Colors as they act mathematically in a similar way to how color theory seems to work, where different colors laid upon each other produces different effects. The idea there, as I understands it, is that those gluon's and quarks, when placed in the right combinations, will create what we think of as ‘lasting matter’.

Or do you see it as quarks only?

"Every quark has one unit of one of the color charges. In addition, quarks come in different “flavors.” The only ones that play a role in ordinary matter are two flavours called u and d, for up and down. [Of course, quark “flavors” have nothing to do with how anything tastes. And, these names for u and d don’t imply that there’s any real connection between flavors and directions. Don’t blame me; when I get the chance, I give particles dignified scientific-sounding names like axion and anyon.] There are u quarks with a unit of red charge, d quarks with a unit of green charge, and so forth, for six different possibilities altogether. And instead of one photon that responds to electric charge, QCD has eight color gluons that can either respond to different color charges or change one into another.

So there is quite a large variety of sticks, and there are also many different kinds of hubs that connect them. It seems like things could get terribly complicated and messy. And so they would, were it not for the overwhelming symmetry of the theory. If you interchange red with blue everywhere, for example, you must still get the same rules. The more complete symmetry allows you to mix the colors continuously, forming blends, and the rules must come out the same for blends as for pure colors. I won’t be able to do justice to the mathematics here, of course. But the final result is noteworthy, and easy to convey: there is one and only one way to assign rules to all the possible hubs so that the theory comes out fully symmetric. Intricate it may be, but messy it is not! …"


Also the quarks are described as acting the opposite to what one would expect a 'force' to work macroscopically. Where the best description I've seen is like they were made out of rubber bands. The more you stretch a rubber band the harder it will oppose your 'force', until it breaks, and when it 'breaks' it will create two new quarks collecting/attracting new gluon's.

Is that how you see it too?
===

“The crucial difference between the two theories is that while the photons of QED (Quantum Electro Dynamics) carry no charge of their own, the gluons of QCD are themselves colored particles. A quark is surrounded by a sea of ‘virtual’gluons that arise due to quantum fluctuations, and the color of the virtual gluons enhances the quark’s own color. A probe coming closer and closer to the quark is influenced less and less by the virtual gluons, so that the effective color charge of the quark seems to weaken; this is asymptotic freedom.” And because the coupling constant increases as you separate the quarks, it soon becomes insurmountable.

The rubber band snaps, but instead of spilling forth the quarks it restrained, two new rubber bands form, each binding up a new particle. The fresh quarks needed to round out the new doublets or triplets are conjured out of the energy imparted to them—E=mc2 and all that. Armed with the proper beta function, the interactions resulting from the strong nuclear force suddenly became calculable in full detail.”

« Last Edit: 15/12/2010 21:09:15 by yor_on »
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #19 on: 15/12/2010 20:57:17 »
And what would you describe a photon as?

It both can act as a object of gravity, 'attracting' another photon, as well as 'pushing' on 'objects'?
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #20 on: 15/12/2010 21:10:17 »
I think I see how you think?
As if electro magnetism took the place of gluon's?
=

But it still seems as if you would need a lot of formalism proving that it cover the same possibilities as QED and QDC? There quarks have both a color charge and a flavor. "There are u quarks with a unit of red charge, d quarks with a unit of green charge, and so forth, for six different possibilities altogether. And instead of one photon that responds to electric charge, QCD has eight color gluons that can either respond to different color charges or change one into another."

How does electro magnetism take care of that?
Or it don't need too?
==

As you made me curious :)
This is the main stream description as I understands it.
And a quite funny one too ::))

"Protons are made of two Up and one Down quark. The neutron  is made of two Down and one Up quark. The Up quarks have a 2/3 positive charge and the Down has a 1/3 negative charge. Fractional charges are a pretty funny concept, but remember we (humans) made up the unit of charge that a proton has, so its very possible that there could be a smaller division of charge. If you add those charges you will see that sum is positive one for the proton and 0 for the neutron.

Truth and Beauty quarks were called T and B when originally proposed, to be Top and Bottom in analogy with the nucleon quarks that had just been renamed the Up and Down quarks. (Originally P and N had been used, but this led to confusion with the nucleons.) Very soon after the proposal T and B was made, somebody, maybe MGM, decided to call them Truth and Beauty. This nomenclature remained standard for several years. The term Beauty is still often used for the B quark. The Cornell accelerator was called a "Beauty factory" which sounds much nicer than a "Bottom factory." After the B was discovered and years went by without the T, people started to say "the quark model has no truth." This was true, but did not sound nice. This incident caused the name Truth to be dropped and Top and Bottom again became standard. Now that the T quark is well established, the name Truth can safely be brought back, but I don't know if it will, since MGM does other things now.

A Theoretician, who formulates ideas or theories, suggests that to explain certain natural phenomena, a certain particle must exist. Other scientists and experimentalists do experiments to look for that particle. In the early 1960's a theoretician, Murray Gell-Mann, proposed the quark theory. He named the quarks then even though they had never been observed. It took experimentalists nearly 30 years to find proof of the existence of all six quarks. The Top was the last quark discovered in two experiments called CDF and D0 at a sister lab to Jefferson Lab, Fermilab, outside Chicago. They announced their discovery in April, 1994. Many particles have been discovered by accident during an experiment looking at something else. The experimenter then gets to name that particle, therefore a lot of particles have awfully silly names."
==

And that was also why people doubted in quarks. Fractional charges was a new idea and not seen before. "The proof that quarks really exist came in 1969 when one observed the substructure of the proton in an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. This discovery was later awarded the 1990 Nobel Prize. By irradiating a fixed target of protons with high energy electrons and studying how the electrons were scattered one could deduce that the proton has a substructure, the quarks."

So do your quarks also have fractional charges?
« Last Edit: 15/12/2010 21:39:25 by yor_on »
 

Offline Bengt

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« Reply #21 on: 15/12/2010 21:37:28 »
There are only two stable quarks: Up and Down. A proton consists of a three leaf clover with one Down-quark and two Up-quarks. An up-quark can fuse with an electron changing it from a +2/3e up-quark to a to a -1/3e down-quark. This by the way changes a Proton to a Neutron.
Don't look for separate quarks floating around. They have only been observed in threesomes. If you rip one quark off a three leaf quark clover, the remaining standing wave dissolves into radiation energy.
The word "Gluon" is merely a placeholder and a functionality name for an effect that has not been explained earlier. Strong force is a resultant of multiple static force vectors. That is a discussion in itself.
Bengt
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #22 on: 15/12/2010 21:55:28 »
I don't know, there must be a reason for the complexity in QED and QDC?
Do you get the same results from a simpler theory?

Fractional charges is a fascinating idea though :)

"Last month, two groups of physicists revealed the first direct evidence that an electric current can be carried by quasiparticles with fractional charge."All the interacting electrons are there but they behave as if they are non-interacting quasiparticles with charges of one-third, " says Moty Heiblum of the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel, who heads one of the groups.

The Israeli group, published its results in Nature, while a French group based at the CEA laboratory near Paris, published its results in Physical Review Letters.

Both groups measured a small electrical current in a two-dimensional electron gas sandwiched between two semiconductor layers. Fluctuations in the current - shot noise - were used to measure the electrical charge of the carrier particles. The sample was chilled to less than 1 K and a strong magnetic field applied at right angles to the layers. By analysing the shot noise in this regime, both groups reported evidence that the electric current is carried by quanta with charge one-third that of the electron. "Up until now, there was no evidence that current could be carried by a fractionally charged quasiparticle, " says Christian Glattli, who heads the French group.

The results agree with a theory which was formulated by Robert Laughlin in 1982 to explain the fractional quantum Hall effect. According to Laughlin, electrons in strong magnetic fields form an exotic new collective state, similar to the way in which collective states form in superfluid helium. A quantum of magnetic flux and an electron exist as a quasiparticle that carries the electric current.

So why did the researchers observe quasiparticles with charges of a third, rather than any other fraction? In Laughlin's theory, the denominator is always odd, so quasiparticles can carry one-third, one-fifth, one-seventh - or indeed, two-thirds, two-fifths or three-fifths - of the charge on an electron. "It is very difficult to explain intuitively - it is just how nature works, " says Heiblum."

From Fractional charges.

And "Fractionally charged quasiparticles are neither bosons nor fermions and exhibit anyonic statistics. The fractional quantum Hall effect continues to be influential in theories about topological order. Certain fractional quantum Hall phases appear to have the right properties for building a topological quantum computer." From Fractional quantum Hall effect
« Last Edit: 15/12/2010 21:57:19 by yor_on »
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #23 on: 15/12/2010 22:09:26 »
I'm enjoying this btw. As I said I hadn't really looked at it in depth before, just skimmed it :) ..

Quasi particles is a concept from condensed matter physics,it seems?
And I really like the way they include the effects the 'particle' have on the system, as being the whole of the 'particle', well as I understands it. It resonates with how I see it too, although for me the 'particle' is its 'effects' and 'confinement' combined, no need for anything 'there' really as it is its relations that creates it :)

I'm weird :)
 

Offline yor_on

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« Reply #24 on: 15/12/2010 22:50:44 »
"Strong force is a resultant of multiple static force vectors. That is a discussion in itself." And that is the gluons as I understand it in 'color theory'? About a 100 times stronger than the electromagnetic force?

Do you mean that EM fields(?) somehow creates vectors reinforcing themselves?
Or how do you see it?
« Last Edit: 15/12/2010 22:54:43 by yor_on »
 

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