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Author Topic: Is it true that Slugs and snails avoid crossing copper strips?  (Read 7798 times)

Offline maffsolo

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Well several URLs suggest that copper strips or small fence of copper mesh can be used as a deterrent for slugs or snails. Some URLs suggest you can induce a small electrical charge, some do not even mention it.
What is the reason that these creatures do not like crossing copper material?


 

Offline Bored chemist

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Copper compounds are toxic to molluscs.
From our point of view, copper compounds taste revolting. It is perfectly possible that slugs and snails can detect copper salts in a similar way to our tongues. Since it's bad for them they would be sensible to have evolved to avoid it.
 

Offline maffsolo

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Thank you  Bored Chemist
 

Offline Geezer

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Yup. Nasty stuff copper. If you want to prevent moss from growing on a roof, run strips of copper along the ridges. When it rains, the runoff poisons the moss. I understand zinc also works, but copper seems to be more effective.
 

Offline Bill.D.Katt.

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If you live in the USA be careful with having it on your roof though. Bird feces contain uric acid which will slowly brake down the copper, and the runoff from your roof will most likely have a higher copper concentration than EPA standards. It is unlikely that the EPA will check houses for that, but on the very off chance...
 

Offline Geezer

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If you live in the USA be careful with having it on your roof though. Bird feces contain uric acid which will slowly brake down the copper, and the runoff from your roof will most likely have a higher copper concentration than EPA standards. It is unlikely that the EPA will check houses for that, but on the very off chance...

Ah! So you probably want to install a cat on the roof while you are at it.

I suppose that explains why you can buy strips of zinc for moss protection, but I don't think anyone sells copper strip for that application. Which reminds me, I bought a roll of zinc for that purpose about four years ago. I'm just waiting for the weather to cooperate so I can get up there and glue it on. Of course, when the weather finally does cooperate, I probably won't be able to find the roll of zinc or the adhesive that came with it.
 

Offline maffsolo

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Of course, when the weather finally does cooperate, I probably won't be able to find the roll of zinc or the adhesive that came with it.

Wow that is a comforting statement I always thought that that only happens to me.
 

Offline maffsolo

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If you live in the USA be careful with having it on your roof though. Bird feces contain uric acid which will slowly brake down the copper, and the runoff from your roof will most likely have a higher copper concentration than EPA standards. It is unlikely that the EPA will check houses for that, but on the very off chance...

Lucky elephants don't fly. ;D
Old Church steeples have used copper and still would use copper, if they could afford the alloy. The whole roof would be done in copper.
The EPA would have a field day since churches are  easy to spot contract to the city skyline.
If it were a concern do you think these people would still use copper on the church roofs, as long as they can flip the bill.
 

Offline SeanB

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Copper roofing and downpiping is a target for "recycling" by thieves.
 

Offline maffsolo

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Copper roofing and downpiping is a target for "recycling" by thieves.

Ironic...
http://www.wjactv.com/news/25277463/detail.html
 

Offline YumjikPumpkin

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Is it true that Slugs and snails avoid crossing copper strips?
« Reply #10 on: 21/11/2010 00:43:47 »
Copper roofing and downpiping is a target for "recycling" by thieves.

Ironic...
newbielink:http://www.wjactv.com/news/25277463/detail.html [nonactive]

newbielink:http://www.krdo.com/news/25860899/detail.html [nonactive]

I just read this, same thing, different place.
It could get worse if copper prices continue to rise.

 

Offline Geezer

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Is it true that Slugs and snails avoid crossing copper strips?
« Reply #11 on: 21/11/2010 05:42:31 »
Copper roofing and downpiping is a target for "recycling" by thieves.

Ironic...
http://www.wjactv.com/news/25277463/detail.html

http://www.krdo.com/news/25860899/detail.html

I just read this, same thing, different place.
It could get worse if copper prices continue to rise.



It's not a new crime. People have been stealing copper lightning conductors from church spires for years, not to mention the lead off the roofs.
 

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Is it true that Slugs and snails avoid crossing copper strips?
« Reply #11 on: 21/11/2010 05:42:31 »

 

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