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Author Topic: Is <Time> Man's invention, or a product of nature?  (Read 3486 times)

Offline Dominus

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    • The physical creation of Time and Space
   Premise
I would like to submit a proposition which has the disadvantage of being unorthodox with respect to the ongoing scientific beliefs and the advantage of (1) giving our universe a physical identity, and (2) eliminate altogether and disinfect physics from anomalies such as paradoxes, nonlocality, uncertainties, renormalization, and the like.
I would also like to recall to mind that the parameter <time> was, and still is today, considered nothing else but a mental abstraction; time, said to say, is just a gadget hanging from the wall. As a matter of fact, one of the very few men who tried to explain the nature of time was the Greek philosopher Aristotle who in his book of physics said and I quote Time is therefore either a process or is somehow dependent upon a process; and since it is not the former, it must be the latter unquote.
What I am now presenting are three fundamental axioms delineating the world we live in. In passing your comments, keep in mind please that I am dismounting a scientific “belief” with something whose consistency has been shown by numerous experiments carried out in the name of relativity and adjusted to unconsciously fit in what in the past was wrongly called ether.

   Proposition
I would now like to go a little further than Aristotle. I would like to state that time is the end product of a natural process, an electromagnetic natural process put there by mother nature. For the unlikely sniper, I shall say that what seems to be a strong statement, it is only consequent upon the many Relativity experiments such as the twin paradox, the time dilation, and so forth.
In order to be brief and possibly efficient, I shall now summarize and put my proposition into three axioms:
1.   Time and space are physically created by an electromagnetic process of expansion and/or extension to be identified with the existing electromagnetic spectrum.
2.   Time and space have their origin in each and every electromagnetic point-source in free space as well as in matter.
3.   Given (1) and (2), it follows that the speed at which time and space are created (a) is the upper limit and dictates the physical laws in the world we live in [fully expanded time dimension], and (b) it is a function of linear and nonlinear motion in free space.
In particular axiom (2) implies that space is permeated by an all-pervasive and permanent substance which I shall herein label “time-fabric”, meaning to say: a permanent nonzero source of energy. From this we may deduce that space is filled by point-like sources which are magnetized by the finite and uniform speed of the expansion and/or extension. These sources moreover during their decaying process come to form all lengths of time and/or space. These lengths are the real volume containing energy. The entire free space is therefore a universal unsaturated sink with continuous absorption because of the constant expansion and/or extension.
My readers have already come to realize that if we take <time> from the wall and put it where it belongs, then: there will be no more paradoxes or uncertainties, there will be no renormalization or nonlocality. In other words, if <time> is embedded into space the time dilation is no longer a paradox, but the most natural thing to happen, when it happens. Likewise, if <time> is created everywhere and everywhen by an electromagnetic process of expansion, then: the twin that "goes around the world" must be well and truly younger than his twin brother, there is no paradox here. To put it in more practical terms, a moving frame is characterized by a shorter unit measure of time, as indeed Minkowski with his Pythagoras triangle wants it; the faster the moving frame the shorter the unit measure of time. In point of fact, if the frame moves at the speed of the electromagnetic process, it is none other than a light ray which is known to be light-like, or null-separated, that is: for a light ray time does not exist since the temporal process is being fully covered by the speed of the light ray.
« Last Edit: 13/03/2011 06:00:09 by Dominus »


 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Is <Time> Man's invention, or a product of nature?
« Reply #1 on: 06/12/2010 14:47:41 »
On earth, your reference frame is essentially fixed with respect to everything else on earth.  At which point the rate of progression of time is constant.

Certainly our units of time are arbitrary based on earth's rotational period, and earth's orbital period.
 

Offline Dominus

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Re: Is <Time> Man's invention, or a product of nature?
« Reply #2 on: 07/12/2010 08:04:56 »
On earth, your reference frame is essentially fixed with respect to everything else on earth.  At which point the rate of progression of time is constant.

Certainly our units of time are arbitrary based on earth's rotational period, and earth's orbital period.

The second as the basic unit measure of time, which not very long ago was determined with reference to the rotation of our planet, it is nowadays officially defined as: «the time required for the speed of light to travel a distance of 299.793 kilometres in vacuum». We have to leave it at that, thank you.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Is <Time> Man's invention, or a product of nature?
« Reply #3 on: 08/12/2010 07:40:51 »

The second as the basic unit measure of time, which not very long ago was determined with reference to the rotation of our planet, it is nowadays officially defined as: «the time required for the speed of light to travel a distance of 299.793 kilometres in vacuum». We have to leave it at that, thank you.

Ahh...
So, all I would need to do to make a clock is to make a vacuum tube 149.8965 km long and put a mirror in the end of it...  then make an oscillator.  Easy as pie.  Now, all one has to do is figure out what a meter is.

So...  the definition of a meter:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metre#Speed_of_light
Quote
The metre is the length of the path traveled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299,792,458 of a second.

Physicists come up with wonderfully useful information!!!!

If a definition of a second depends on the length of a meter, and the length of a meter depends on the definition of a second. ??? ::)

Actually, the second is defined as:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SI_base_unit
Quote
"The second is the duration of 9 192 631 770 periods of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom."
13th CGPM (1967/68, Resolution 1; CR, 103)
"This definition refers to a caesium atom at rest at a temperature of 0 K."
(Added by CIPM in 1997)

Ok, so scrap the earlier "clock".

Now, all I have to do is make my clock at 0K.

Did anybody ever think about defining the basic unit of time at a temperature that is asymptotically impossible to reach?

Apparently the lowest observed temperature is: 100 pK, or 0.0000000001 K
http://ltl.tkk.fi/wiki/LTL/World_record_in_low_temperatures
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Is <Time> Man's invention, or a product of nature?
« Reply #4 on: 08/12/2010 07:57:43 »
You know...
Other than the Zero K thing...  who came up with that?

Anyway, if one defines time within a reference frame, then its speed of passing is constant within your reference frame.  If you accelerate the reference frame (with the clock), the time internal to that reference frame remains constant.

Obviously if we ever develop modes of travel covering interstellar distances at near the speed of light, then one might have to include both internal and external reference frames as part of the time definition (I believe that even now satellites use an earth-bound time reference frame).
 

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Re: Is <Time> Man's invention, or a product of nature?
« Reply #4 on: 08/12/2010 07:57:43 »

 

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