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Author Topic: Can I boil water for my tea with a heat pump on a processor (say in my desktop)?  (Read 6413 times)

Offline peppercorn

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Here's ya standard chip cooling thingy of the heat pump persuasion:



Here's a domestic pump for moving lots of low value heat from the ground to make a cosy interior temp (relatively little amount of high value heat) using a pump (like a reverse fridge).



Combining the ideas of these two should mean I can have enough hot water for a cup of tea or two after a reasonable period of having my PC on & keeping it cool enough to keep working.  Right? ;)


 

Offline maffsolo

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The unit of heat equal to the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water by 1°C at 1 atmosphere pressure.

Definition: A British Thermal Unit (BTU) is the amount of heat energy needed to raise the temperature of one pound of water by one degree F. This is the standard measurement used to state the amount of energy that a fuel has as well as the amount of output of any heat generating device.
You might be able to imagine it this way. Take one gallon (8 pounds) of water and put it on your stove. If the water it 60 degrees F. and you want to bring it to a boil (212 degrees F.) then you will need about 1,200 BTUs to do this.
http://bbq.about.com/od/gasgrills/g/gbtu.htm

I believe the water cooling the CPU will also have to be at least 212 degrees F and distribute it on whe venting side transfering that heat to a cup of water.
You might have luck warm tea or a fried cpu.

 

Offline peppercorn

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I believe the water cooling the CPU will also have to be at least 212 degrees F and distribute it on whe venting side transfering that heat to a cup of water.
You might have luck warm tea or a fried cpu.

I don;t think you understand heat pumps. The ground in your garden isn;t 50degC but a ground source heat pump can put out water (for hot water or heating system) of this amount - like I said a fridge in reverse.
 

Offline maffsolo

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I believe the water cooling the CPU will also have to be at least 212 degrees F and distribute it on whe venting side transfering that heat to a cup of water.
You might have luck warm tea or a fried cpu.

I don;t think you understand heat pumps. The ground in your garden isn;t 50degC but a ground source heat pump can put out water (for hot water or heating system) of this amount - like I said a fridge in reverse.

Yea you’re right. I am looking at the cooler as being similar as radiator on a car.
Instead of the cooling fins, a reservoir water jacket surrounding the cooling coils and a passive thermostat for the hot water release. This drinking water needs to be kept at a circulating temperature and replenished when used for drink, to help the cooling of the object .
« Last Edit: 22/11/2010 23:48:20 by maffsolo »
 

Offline peppercorn

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Yea you’re right. I am looking at the cooler as being similar as radiator on a car.
Instead of the cooling fins, a reservoir water jacket surrounding the cooling coils and a passive thermostat for the hot water release. This drinking water needs to be kept at a circulating temperature and replenished when used for drink, to help the cooling of the object.

TBH, I asked the question was asked in a moment of frivolity!
I would like to estimate some figures though; just for the hell of it!
 

Offline SeanB

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You can get a heat pump that will give you hot water, and when installed it gives you cooling in summer and in winter. You use the outside air and vent it back outside in winter instead of pumping it inside. Saves around 50% of the cost of heating water, at the expense of having to run the heat pump at a high differential which reduces it's efficiency, as most commonly you are pumping a differential of around 30C whereas with this you are aiming at around a 60C differential. Still a saving, and if you couple it with passive solar heating you can save a considerable amount. Of course passive solar is really dependent on having sunny weather, which may be a bit of a problem in the UK at times.

As to actually boiling water, you are probably better off using an active cooler from the CPU, as opposed to the simple heat pipe you have at present in the picture. Either an actual refrigerant system that uses a phase change to transfer heat ( evaporator, compressor, condenser and expansion device) or a petlier cooler that has no moving parts like those used on car coolers.

 

Offline peppercorn

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As to actually boiling water, you are probably better off using an active cooler from the CPU, as opposed to the simple heat pipe you have at present in the picture. Either an actual refrigerant system that uses a phase change to transfer heat ( evaporator, compressor, condenser and expansion device) or a petlier cooler that has no moving parts like those used on car coolers.

I thought what I'd shown was an active cooler (ie. a heat pump) - It has larger pipes one side & small ones the other.  From my text I thought I made it clear that this is clearly the type I was talking about.

It is 'just a it of fun' (as John Snow says at election time!), but it should be quite possible to keep the CPU cool at one end of a device, whilst boiling water at the other.
« Last Edit: 23/11/2010 18:41:59 by peppercorn »
 

Offline Geezer

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As to actually boiling water, you are probably better off using an active cooler from the CPU, as opposed to the simple heat pipe you have at present in the picture. Either an actual refrigerant system that uses a phase change to transfer heat ( evaporator, compressor, condenser and expansion device) or a petlier cooler that has no moving parts like those used on car coolers.

I thought what I'd shown was an active cooler (i.e a heat pump) - It has larger pipes one side & small ones the other,.

It's probably a heat pipe heat sink, which I think means it's a passive (rather than active) device. I'm assuming an active device (like a heat pump) requires work input. Without the input of work, you would be elevating the temperature by "concentrating heat". This would be tremendously cool (er, hot?) because it would allow as to reverse entropy and solve all our energy problems.

Alas, I also think it would violate more than a couple of the laws of physics.
 

Offline peppercorn

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"[can't] violate more ...the laws of physics" - I'm really hearing the Scots accent there for some reason! ;D

I'm assuming an active device (like a heat pump) requires work input. Without the input of work, you would be elevating the temperature by "concentrating heat". This would be tremendously cool (er, hot?) because it would allow as to reverse entropy and solve all our energy problems.
I clearly meant an active device ::)
I'm not trying to get something for nothing you know :-X

For arguments sake lets say a heat pipe carries heat from the CPU to a large thermal reservoir (say a large lump of iron).  Then a heat pump at regular intervals switches on to move & concentrate the heat over to a small 'one-cup-kettle'.  It's not impossible... is it?  mmmm?? :P
 

Online Bored chemist

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A stack of Peltier coolers (which are heat pumps- they just happen to use electrons as the "working fluid") would be able to cool the CPU and boil water.

This is probably no more stupid then the USB powered cup warmer.

You could also use the Peltier unit in reverse ( i.e. to covert the energy released by heat moving from a hot chip to a cold room into electricity) Then you could store up that electricity  until you had enough to make a cup of tea.
(that idea probably is more stupid then the USB powered cup warmer)
 

Offline Geezer

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We won't be needing any Peltier coolers around here tonight. They are saying it's likely to get down to -11°

FAHRENHEIT!
 

Offline maffsolo

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We won't be needing any Peltier coolers around here tonight. They are saying it's likely to get down to -11°

FAHRENHEIT!

Oh you can do that experiment does hot water freeze completely  faster than cold water HEHEHEH

You have my sympathy
 

Offline Geezer

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I suppose I could try the "whizzing from a great height" experiment to find out how far it drops before freezing. I'll need an assistant to hold the ruler.
 

Offline imatfaal

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"Hello Emergency 9-1-1"
"Hello - I didn't know whether to call or not, but it's the middle of the night and eleven degrees below and yet there's this weird man, in a tartan skirt, weeing from the top of the water tower."
"Ok, Thank You for calling Sir; we'll send the police, the medics, and their special white jacket with long sleeves and buckles on the back"

click brrr
 

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