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Author Topic: Emergency Reply Soon!!!  (Read 3959 times)

Offline DOZ

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Emergency Reply Soon!!!
« on: 16/02/2006 13:57:31 »
Day before yesterday there was a chemical spill on the health compound adjacent to mine.  We were evacuated but not told exactly what it was.  Then on the news it was learned that several children at a nearby school and their teaches were gravely ill from this spill.  Our building is closer to the building that the school.  It was reported that it was a pesticide called malathion actually an expired container of malathion that sprang a leek.  Because it could not be removed, they buried it on the compound.

Was this the right thing to do?  What are the longterm effects of exposure to this chemical? and today I have headaches, and stomach cramps are these symptoms?  

by the way, we were told we had to return to work the next day, but several people have fellen ill.  How long should we have been away?  Please an answer in this matter is urgently needed.  I am from the island of Tobago in the caribbean.  I was told that this substance is banned.


 

another_someone

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Re: Emergency Reply Soon!!!
« Reply #1 on: 16/02/2006 22:37:01 »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malathion
quote:

Malathion is an organophosphate parasympathomimetic which binds irreversibly to cholinesterase.
Malathion is an insecticide of relatively low human toxicity.


However, Malathion breaks down into Malaoxon, which is 60 times more toxic than Malathion. For this reason, if Malathion is used or somehow enters an indoor environment, as it breaks down into Malaoxon, it can seriously and chronically poison the occupants living or working in this environmnent.
In 1976, numerous malaria workers in Pakistan were poisoned by isomalathion, a common impurity in malathion, which is capable of inhibiting carboxyesterase enzymes in those exposed to it; the original toxicity evaluation for malathion had not anticipated isomalathion coexposure.



I don't know much about your problem, but the symptoms you are showing would lead me to suggest you see your doctor urgently.
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: Emergency Reply Soon!!!
« Reply #2 on: 16/02/2006 23:32:37 »
Human studies have show that this chemical is very low in toxicity and causes very little effects . the chemical also leaves the body in your urine within 24 hours  

it breaks-down quickly in soil and does not evaporate easily

This article should allay your fears scroll down to the human studies. Its possible the symptoms you and everyone else are suffering are psychosomatic brought on by  anxiety and fears rather than chemical poisoning.

http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/malagen.pdf

Michael
« Last Edit: 16/02/2006 23:42:38 by ukmicky »
 

another_someone

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Re: Emergency Reply Soon!!!
« Reply #3 on: 16/02/2006 23:57:31 »
Michael,

I don't wish to sound alarmist, but DOZ mentioned that malathion was very old, out pf date, and the containers it was in were leaking.  It is the breakdown of  Malathion into Malaoxon that sounds the more dangerous.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=2725814&dopt=Abstract
quote:

The potential of a single dose of malaoxon (26.2 or 39.2 mg/kg i.p.) to produce convulsions and to increase cerebral levels of inositol-1-phosphate (Ins1P), an intermediate in phosphoinositide (PI) cycle, was followed for 1, 4, or 72 hr. The lower dose of malaoxon did not produce convulsions whereas the higher dose induced convulsions in 60% of the exposed rats. Malaoxon caused a dose-dependent, at most 2-fold, increase in brain regional Ins1P levels in nonconvulsing rats as compared to controls. At the higher dose of malaoxon, in convulsing rats, the Ins1P-levels increased 4-fold above the control Ins1P-levels. In nonconvulsing rats, the Ins1P-levels reached their maximum 1-4 hr after the administration of malaoxon, whereas in convulsing rats the levels increased for 72 hr. The results suggest that PI-signalling is associated with convulsions produced by malaoxon.



http://www.safe2use.com/poisons-pesticides/pesticides/malathion/malaoxon.htm
quote:

In trying to calm the fears of Tampa residents, representatives for the Florida Department of Agriculture have made public statements that after application, malathion "breaks-down" in a matter of hours. What they don't tell you is that malathion can actually break-down into compounds which are more poisonous than the malathion itself. This is, in fact, the conclusion of research from a graduate project by researcher N. E. Barlas at the Department of Biology, Hacetepe University, Turkey. Barlas went on to say, "The disappearance of pesticide residues at a given location does not mean the end of the problem. Pesticides can be translocated, bioconcentrated or converted into more dangerous chemicals." The breakdown fate of malathion was studied by adding malathion to soil samples containing 6 species of soil bacteria known to breakdown the pesticide. After 10 days the samples were analyzed. Malathion content had reduced from 100 down to 25 micrograms, so therefore, the Florida Department of Agriculture spokes people are correct when they say it "breaks down" relatively quickly (although in this case not in a matter of hours). However, even more important, Barlas found that new chemicals were formed in this breakdown process including 14 micrograms of monocarboxylic acid and about 8 micrograms of the highly toxic malaoxon. Barlas then exposed mice to the technical grade malathion and another group to the breakdown products just mentioned. Results showed even the mice exposed to the break-down products of malathion showed significant decreases in spleen weights and significant changes in liver blood tests which were suggestive of liver damage. Barlas summarized by stating, "It may be concluded that commercial malathion and it's degradation products together have detrimental effects on mice over a period of 15 weeks of treatment."
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Hacettepe University, Turkey



The other comment that some of the past fatalities caused by malathion were actually caused by impurities in the production which are less likely in modern production is not that helpful unless we can be sure that the batch of the stuff that DOZ was effected by is of recent production.

Some of the other points with regard to safety to wildlife (although clearly not the primary issue here) in your document are contradicted in http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/op/malathion/efed_cover.pdf.

On the more positive note, it does seem that soil bacteria, particularly in acidic conditions, are fairly effective at breaking down the chemical.

George.
« Last Edit: 17/02/2006 02:20:26 by another_someone »
 

another_someone

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Re: Emergency Reply Soon!!!
« Reply #4 on: 17/02/2006 00:24:46 »
I think the case that DOZ is referring to is reported here:

http://www.trinidadexpress.com/index.pl/article?id=136144113
quote:

Almost 300 pupils and teachers of the Signal Hill Government Primary School had to be evacuated yesterday because of a chemical leak emanating from the nearby Public Health Department compound at Signal Hill.
In addition, 80 employees of the Medical Transcription Centre and another 50 employees of the Public Health department had to abandon their jobs to seek refuge from the area. The offices were closed for the day. The drama started when two pupils and a teacher began vomiting during assembly around 8.30 a.m.
An ambulance was summoned but by the time it arrived, ten other pupils complained of feeling unwell. They and the teacher were rushed to the Scarborough Regional Hospital where they were treated and discharged. Other teachers on staff were advised by the Trinidad and Tobago Unified Teachers' Association to also seek medical treatment. School teacher Anderson Charles said he was in charge of Morning Assembly when they began to get a scent of a chemical substance.
"Soon pupils began complaining of feeling unwell and some began vomiting," he said.
Units from the Scarborough Fire Station and the Police responded to the emergency around 9.15 a.m. and assisted in taking pupils in buses to safety at the Red Cross headquarters building, a half mile away.
Fire Station Officer Carlston Edwards confirmed to the Express that the pupils had inhaled something that smelled like a chemical. Edwards said the chemical turned out to be Malathion used in spraying insects. It was stored in 45-gallon barrels on the eastern end of the compound.



George.
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: Emergency Reply Soon!!!
« Reply #5 on: 17/02/2006 02:18:52 »
Even if it wasn't poisonous they still shouldn't have buried it,it wouldn't have happened over here.

As for what the children breathed in. I would have thought they would have taken samples and tested to see what chemicals were present at the spill site and would have found monocarboxylic acid or Malaoxon,because without that information they wouldnt have been able to treat any one. Maybe their emergency services just ain't as thorough as ours.



Michael
« Last Edit: 17/02/2006 02:33:20 by ukmicky »
 

another_someone

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Re: Emergency Reply Soon!!!
« Reply #6 on: 17/02/2006 02:30:00 »
By instinct, I would agree that burying would not be the wisest course of action; but given the amount of the stuff that must already be in the environment over there, I could not imagine a little more more be noticed.  The main thing appears to be that the soil should be acidic, and I would hope they don't have any aquifers that supply drinking water near by.

Anyway, hopefully DOZ will sign on again soon, tell us she is now feeling fine, and fill in the whys and wherefores.

George.
 

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Re: Emergency Reply Soon!!!
« Reply #6 on: 17/02/2006 02:30:00 »

 

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