The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Would the shape of a box containing light affect photon behaviour?  (Read 2292 times)

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11987
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
If I have a perfectly 'reflecting' box filled with photons/waves. Would the geometry of the box have any importance for the them equalizing out their motion inside the box? Like a perfect sphere as contrasted to 'octopus looking' one, and so their relative 'energy', as seen from an observer at rest with the box?

:)


[MOD EDIT - Title changed to make it slightly more informative of thread content.]
« Last Edit: 05/12/2010 11:10:55 by chris »


 

Offline lightarrow

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4586
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • View Profile
I would say that the box's dimensions/shape are important only if they would be of the order of magnitude of the em radiation's wavelenght . For visible light, a macroscopic box' dimensions/shape would be irrelevant.
 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11987
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Thanks Lightarrow, I wasn't sure on that one, I was thinking in term of the distances involved inside that box. On the other hand, for a light particle it might be different talking about 'distance'?

It's kind of confusing :)
 

Offline Foolosophy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 218
    • View Profile
The Energy of a photon is equal to hf (h= Plancks constant, f=frequency)

or another way of expressing photon energy is E = h(c/λ)

Photons also have momentum and can exert a force.



what will happen to these "enclosed" photons as time goes off to infinity?

 

Offline lightarrow

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4586
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • View Profile
Thanks Lightarrow, I wasn't sure on that one, I was thinking in term of the distances involved inside that box. On the other hand, for a light particle it might be different talking about 'distance'?

It's kind of confusing :)
I agree with you last sentence  :)
Actually I haven't understood what you want to ask. Maybe you intended something like "in the frame of the photon"? If so the answer is simple: it doesn't exist (the photon's frame) so distances are measured in other frames, for example in the one of the box.
 

Offline lightarrow

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 4586
  • Thanked: 7 times
    • View Profile
The Energy of a photon is equal to hf (h= Plancks constant, f=frequency)

or another way of expressing photon energy is E = h(c/λ)

Photons also have momentum and can exert a force.



what will happen to these "enclosed" photons as time goes off to infinity?
If photons are not absorbed (and this is as improbable as the fact dead men could resurrect  ;)) then the photons' wavepackets spreads infinitely and the light becomes totally monochromatic.
(I suppose).
 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11987
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
No Lightarrow, you got it.
But, it's still confusing.

Nice one Foolosophy, whose time?

:)
 

Offline Foolosophy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 218
    • View Profile
No Lightarrow, you got it.
But, it's still confusing.

Nice one Foolosophy, whose time?

:)

who knows???

time may not even exist in any physical realm

pick a version out of a hat
 

Offline yor_on

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 11987
  • Thanked: 4 times
  • (Ah, yes:) *a table is always good to hide under*
    • View Profile
Yep, I agree. then we're both mad hatters :)
 

Offline Foolosophy

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 218
    • View Profile
Yep, I agree. then we're both mad hatters :)

the only way to live
 

The Naked Scientists Forum


 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums