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Author Topic: Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?  (Read 17432 times)

cat_with_no_eyes

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« on: 09/12/2010 21:22:49 »
Is being able to hear 10 HZ considered normal?

And can humans hear below 10 Hz?


 

Offline peppercorn

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #1 on: 09/12/2010 23:10:57 »
Feel, not hear.
 

SteveFish

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #2 on: 09/12/2010 23:44:07 »
The range in hearing is quite large. There are some orchestral instruments that produce notes below 30 hz and people that hear this as a note. What is normal for hearing is what is, but somebody that could hear above 30K hz and below 30 hz would certainly be unusual.
 

Offline maffsolo

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #3 on: 09/12/2010 23:51:22 »
Feel, not hear.

I was just thinking of what I can use as an example.
 

Offline maffsolo

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #4 on: 10/12/2010 03:08:51 »
Feel, not hear.

I was just thinking of what I can use as an example.
Is there a Doctor in the house?
I just got up and can not hear from one ear and I have vertigo!!!
 

Offline Geezer

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #5 on: 10/12/2010 06:16:08 »
I agree. Below 10 Hz would certainly be unusual for a human to hear, but we might feel such frequencies. There are stories that 7 Hz can be very disruptive to humans, but that may be more of an urban legend than real science.

BTW, vertigo is horrible. I was in a plane once with my boss. He had a cold, and probably an inner ear infection. As we were coming in to land, he suddenly had my arm in a vise like grip. He was convinced the plane was flying upside down!

I suffered from the dreaded "turning" for a while myself. It's a sensation you get whenever you are motionless that everything is rotating around you. Lying in bed makes it even worse. In my case it was brought on by work related stress.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #6 on: 11/12/2010 04:08:19 »
If you have a sudden change like loss of sensation in one side of the body... without any obvious explanation (for example an illness or an ear infection), it could be a sign of an emergency.  Consult your doctor rather than posting on the internet. 
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I'm seeing that human hearing range is down to about 10-12HZ.  But, at that level it is probably as much a corporal sensation as anything else.

Earthquakes are supposed to be in the sub-10HZ range.  Perhaps you should move to San Francisco  :)

One of the lowest frequency ship horns was the (original) Queen Mary at 55 Hz.

I think the low frequency was chosen as they could blast out a very loud blast without damaging people's ears.  And it carried well.
 

Offline maffsolo

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #7 on: 11/12/2010 10:07:58 »
My experience is over 2 years ago Sat up and it was a sudden ringing in on ear then a clogging sort of like water in the ear. Fell back to sleep no other signs until I got up the next morning to hit the head. All I could do is aim for a wall and run to it until I could sit.
Head in the bath tub arse on the bowl, riding a Merry go round. No other sensations.

Thanks for the suggestion Cliff, my hind sight has sharpened to 20-15.
 

cat_with_no_eyes

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #8 on: 11/12/2010 22:07:51 »
Yeah thats fine, I has a hearing test done a few days ago and it was bang on 10 HZ. Just wanted to clarify.

Well I dont know whether it was that I could feel as such, the bloke just told me to press the buzzer when I could hear a sound'. SO I dont think its about feeling 10 HZ.
« Last Edit: 11/12/2010 22:11:37 by cat_with_no_eyes »
 

Offline RD

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #9 on: 12/12/2010 09:13:33 »
I've made a low frequency test signal mp3 which can be downloaded here, (if flaky Google docs is working properly).

WARNING: playing this test mp3 at high volume could damage bass loudspeakers. 
Quote
With a sufficiently large input, the excursion will cause damage to the voice coil or other moving part of the driver.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thiele/Small#Large_signal_parameters
  

It is four sinewave tones each 5 seconds long @ 20Hz 15Hz 10Hz 5Hz with a half second gap between each.

There are complicating factors:-
 
1. your headphones /  audio electronics may not be able to reproduce these very low frequencies. 

2. You may hear a harmonic if the sine signal is distorted, (i.e. you can hear something but it's not actually the low fundamental frequency), so use moderate volume settings, say 3/10, to avoid distortion.


BTW like age realted high frequency loss whether you can hear the test may also depend on how old you are.
« Last Edit: 12/12/2010 09:48:36 by RD »
 

Offline Geezer

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #10 on: 12/12/2010 19:00:21 »
As RD points out, don't run the sine wave test continously. It might also overload your amplifier, but the short durations that RD posted should not be a problem.

When you run the test, you might even take the front cover off your speaker so you can see the cone. If you can see that the cone is doing a whopping 10 Hz excursion and the cabinet it bouncing around on the floor, but you can't hear much, it's probably fair to say you are not hearing it  ;D
 

Offline RD

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #11 on: 13/12/2010 13:14:41 »
As RD points out, don't run the sine wave test continously.

High volume rather than long duration was my concern:
 a momentary impulse of sufficient amplitude could be enough to dislocate the voice coil and knacker the speaker.
 

Offline Geezer

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #12 on: 13/12/2010 19:30:30 »
As RD points out, don't run the sine wave test continously.

High volume rather than long duration was my concern:
 a momentary impulse of sufficient amplitude could be enough to dislocate the voice coil and knacker the speaker.

That sounds extremely painful!

In ye olden days of class AB amplifiers, pushing a pure sine wave through then would result in maximum power dissipation for a given amplitude, which is why they were rated both in terms of "music power" and RMS power. However, as I really haven't the foggiest about state of the art power amplifiers, it's probably no longer a concern.
 

Offline RD

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #13 on: 13/12/2010 20:45:16 »
There may be a rumble filter circuit to attenuate subsonic frequencies and prevent this sort of damage, but best not to assume.
« Last Edit: 13/12/2010 20:55:53 by RD »
 

Offline peppercorn

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #14 on: 13/12/2010 20:47:40 »
There may be a rumble filter circuit in the speaker cabinet to attenuate subsonic frequencies and prevent this sort of damage, but best not to assume.

Would that also protect against possible damage from the 'thump' I get when I switch my amplifier on?
 

SteveFish

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #15 on: 14/12/2010 00:50:41 »
Cat_with_no_eyes:

Was your question answered adequately?

Steve
 

cat_with_no_eyes

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #16 on: 27/12/2010 18:06:33 »
I beleive so steve. I believe so.
 

Offline Waldo Pepper

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #17 on: 28/12/2010 13:56:48 »
The range in hearing is quite large. There are some orchestral instruments that produce notes below 30 hz and people that hear this as a note. What is normal for hearing is what is, but somebody that could hear above 30K hz and below 30 hz would certainly be unusual.

They may produce fundamental notes below 30Hz but what you are hearing are harmonics.
 

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Is hearing 10 HZ and below normal?
« Reply #17 on: 28/12/2010 13:56:48 »

 

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