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Author Topic: Will an Egg cook quicker at the top of mount everest if boiled?  (Read 5227 times)

Offline GlentoranMark

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I understand boiling will take place at a lower temperature at higher latitudes but will a 3 minute egg cook the same?


 

SteveFish

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Because the boiling point is lower the water doesn't get as hot and it is the temperature that is important for cooking. For example, I use a pressure cooker to cook some food because it is much faster. The answer to your question is that it will take longer to cook the egg on Mount Everest.
 

Offline Geezer

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er, I think you meant "altitudes" (rather than latitudes)  :)

 

Offline GlentoranMark

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Yes Geezer, I do know the difference. A typo on my behalf  :(

Many thanks Steve for the answer, is it the correct one?

What about the fluids in the egg?
 

Offline Geezer

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I think Steve is quite correct. If you mean "how will the pressure effect the fluids in the eggs" it won't really have any effect in terms of how quickly the egg cooks. That's only a function of the temperature of the water, because that's what determines the rate of heat transfer into the contents of the egg.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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I suspect they might take a pressure cooker with them.
 

Offline Geezer

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I suspect they might take a pressure cooker with them.

Definitely a good idea, particularly if you wanted to boil potatoes. I wonder how long they would take to cook at the top of Everest without a pressure cooker. As the water temperature would only be about 70°C, I would not be surprised if it's more than an hour
 

Offline Bored chemist

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I don't think you could boil spuds up there. I don't think that 70C is hot enough to alter the starches.
 

Offline Geezer

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I don't think you could boil spuds up there. I don't think that 70C is hot enough to alter the starches.

The funny thing is the water would be boiling like crazy!

"Are they ready yet?"

"Nope - still rock hard."

"What!! It's been three hours already.
 

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