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Author Topic: Does space have an edge?  (Read 9319 times)

Offline Bill S

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Does space have an edge?
« Reply #25 on: 17/12/2010 15:55:10 »
If more than one universe exists, and if nothing exists outside each universe, can we say anything about the relative positions of the universes?
 

Offline QuantumClue

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Does space have an edge?
« Reply #26 on: 17/12/2010 16:13:05 »
If more than one universe exists, and if nothing exists outside each universe, can we say anything about the relative positions of the universes?

No because universes are self-contained.

String theory however treats this ''nothingness'' as a multidimensional pool, so maybe from a string theory outlook we may see universes as bubbles arising in a more complex structure. I believe this is a matter of interpretation.
 

Offline Bill S

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Does space have an edge?
« Reply #27 on: 17/12/2010 17:16:13 »
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No because universes are self-contained.

I guess that means you don't agree with David Deutsch's claim to be able to provide "proof" of interaction between universes.
 

Offline QuantumClue

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« Reply #28 on: 17/12/2010 17:19:33 »
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No because universes are self-contained.

I guess that means you don't agree with David Deutsch's claim to be able to provide "proof" of interaction between universes.

Far from it.

I remember work by him hoping to take a photograph of a parallel universe... Is this what you are referring to?
 

Offline QuantumClue

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« Reply #29 on: 17/12/2010 17:54:10 »
If by ''interaction'' we mean, bruises left by another universe during the collision of multiverses in string theory, then I have already entertained the idea that string theory can allow for these types of interactions. It really is a matter of interpretation.
 

Offline Bill S

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Does space have an edge?
« Reply #30 on: 17/12/2010 18:07:49 »
QC, what I was referring to was Deutsch's idea that in the double slit experiment, when photons are sent through singly, interference comes from "shadow photons" in other universes.
 

Offline QuantumClue

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« Reply #31 on: 17/12/2010 18:28:59 »
Tell me more about shadow photons, please.
 

Offline QuantumClue

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« Reply #32 on: 17/12/2010 18:32:41 »
I've heard of shadow particles. A bit of me is telling me they are related?
 

Offline QuantumClue

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Does space have an edge?
« Reply #33 on: 17/12/2010 18:43:50 »
I've had some time to read over it. Apparently Deusch is using the double slit experiment to answer for the existence of parallel universes. This would mean that interference does not occur because wave imply an interference, again because particles are not existent two places at one time. Sorry bud, but as of recently, interference in the double slit experiment truely is down to particle interfering with each other as waves, in more than one place at any single time

http://www.stardrive.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2875:einstein-was-right-you-can-be-in-two-places-at-once&catid=43:science&Itemid=82

No need for parallel universes.
 

Offline JP

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Does space have an edge?
« Reply #34 on: 18/12/2010 10:46:41 »
This is the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, correct?  It's just one of several interpretations of what the mathematics of quantum mechanics means.  All the interpretations give the same results for experimental tests, so there's no need to require extra universes. 

Even if you like this interpretation (I admit I happen to like it), I'm not sure it even makes sense to ask what's in between the universes.  We'd have to be able to experimentally probe the region in between universes to come up with any useful theory, which can't be done. We'd also be using the concept of geometry, which comes from observing how things behave within our universe, and expect it to apply to regions outside our universe.  In fact, even saying "outside the universe" is problematic, since to be outside something implies that there is geometry outside of the universe!
 

Offline Bill S

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Does space have an edge?
« Reply #35 on: 18/12/2010 15:27:17 »
Quote from: JP
In fact, even saying "outside the universe" is problematic, since to be outside something implies that there is geometry outside of the universe!

Exactly.  How would you "probe" nothing.
 

Offline Foolosophy

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Does space have an edge?
« Reply #36 on: 19/12/2010 10:13:55 »
Mathematicians have defined the Universe as boundary less and so an edge cannot exist in the Universe

Of course we the common thinking people understand that Mathematicians are by defintion incorrect
 

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Does space have an edge?
« Reply #36 on: 19/12/2010 10:13:55 »

 

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