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Author Topic: Thyroxin Disorder  (Read 5958 times)

Offline cuso4

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Thyroxin Disorder
« on: 03/09/2003 19:31:31 »
Recently got the news that my aunt has thyroxin disorder:(. Her thyroid gland produces too much thyroxin that the metabolic rate of the body becomes too high. She's lost a lot of weight....poor thing. Fortunately, she discovered this condition early and now her doctor puts her on medicine treatment for a year. What could be the cause of this kind of disorder?

Angel


 

Offline Ians Daddy

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Re: Thyroxin Disorder
« Reply #1 on: 04/09/2003 06:03:16 »
This may be in poor taste, but I truly am curious. If the thyroid could be manipulated to help stop the weight loss, could the process be reversed to promote weight loss? Safely.
 

Offline cuso4

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Re: Thyroxin Disorder
« Reply #2 on: 04/09/2003 13:18:58 »
Theoritically I think it's possible but the question of its safety will have to go to Chris to answer.

Angel
 

Offline chris

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Re: Thyroxin Disorder
« Reply #3 on: 04/09/2003 20:59:49 »
Sorry mate, before you rush off and file your patent it's been considered because it sounds like the ideal remedy for obesity - ramp up the metabolic rate and let the body 'naturally' burn off all its extra calories.

Whilst it does work it is too dangerous to contemplate as a potential weight-loss regimen. Thyroxine (the iodine-rich hormone produced by the thyroid) also influences the production of receptors to adrenaline and hence over-exposure to thyroid hormones can lead to high blood pressure, potentially-dangerous heart rhythm disturbances and high-output heart failure (where the heart cannot keep up with the galloping metabolic demands of the body).

Therefore not a great idea.

Angel your relative has hyperthyroidism. The commonest cause in women is graves disease in which an antibody is accidentally produced which looks like the natural hormone used to switch on the production of thyroxine. In its initial stages this leads to an excess of thyroxine. Have her eyes changed (become more prominent) over the last few years ? There are other causes of hyperthyroidism which I am sure are being looked into.

Chris

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Offline Ians Daddy

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Re: Thyroxin Disorder
« Reply #4 on: 04/09/2003 21:39:07 »
So, when someone is obese, and they say that it's a glandular problem, it's true. I just thought they'd been eating too many glands. Maybe someday this process could be harnessed and utilized to help the obese.

Why does this effect the eyes? Can the hormones and such be leveled out to where she would stop the excessive weight loss?
 

Offline bezoar

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Re: Thyroxin Disorder
« Reply #5 on: 04/09/2003 23:14:10 »
Had a patient with a thyroid nodule that developed after a cold that had the same symptoms.  Eventually, the whole thing blew over, and he refused to take any medication for it.  

I do remember that some of the bariatric docs here used to supplement you with thyroid hormone.  But then I was told that your body will stop making it's own and then your propensity toward obesity is even greater and you end up on a thyroid suppleement for the rest of your life.  I did read some theory on obesity that speculated that obese people have very slight, and often undetectable with a normal thyroid panel, thyroid deficiencies.  Don't know if that's true or not.

Also, and correct me if I'm wrong, the fatty deposits behind the eyes that come with Grave's disease are irreversible, so it's important to catch it as soon as possible to avoid a permanent "deer in the headlights" expression.  I think I read too that there is a surgery to remove that excess fat.

Bezoar
 

Offline cuso4

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Re: Thyroxin Disorder
« Reply #6 on: 05/09/2003 09:09:44 »
Chris, thanks for the explanation. My aunt did say that if hyperthyroidism got more serious her eyes might pop out (not completely obviously). But I don't think she's onto that stage at the moment. Anyway I'll see if I can get more detailed description of symptons from her.

Angel
 

Offline chris

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Re: Thyroxin Disorder
« Reply #7 on: 05/09/2003 14:31:17 »
Bezoar - yep, quite right. The proptosis or exopthalamos (bulging eyes) seen with some sorts of thyroid disease are caused by the proliferation (growth) of tissue behind the eyeball. If it begins to compromise sight (congestive opthalmopathy or corneal drying and abrasion) then surgical intervention can help.

In relation to weight, a very tiny minority of obese people actually have anything wrong with their thyroid, but it's important to check. It's also worth bearing in mind that, in the absence of a thyroid problem, the larger you are the higher your metabolic rate, simply because of the effort it takes to cart around all the excess weight. People go on diets to slim down and forget that the very tissue that can burn off energy - the lean tissue - will disappear too. But you can stop this happening by taking exercise which not only boosts your metabolic rate further (so you consume more energy), it also preserves lean tissue so you continue losing weight.

Chris

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Offline bezoar

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Re: Thyroxin Disorder
« Reply #8 on: 06/09/2003 01:11:56 »
Hmm, guess I'll keep walking.  What's your take on weight lifting for the older folks like me?  I heard it's not only supposed to preserve and rebuild muscle mass, but also help prevent osteoporosis.

Bezoar
 

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Re: Thyroxin Disorder
« Reply #8 on: 06/09/2003 01:11:56 »

 

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