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Author Topic: The uncertainty principle and bound protons and neutrons  (Read 9773 times)

Offline lightarrow

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The uncertainty principle and bound protons and neutrons
« Reply #25 on: 25/02/2011 15:20:36 »
Just thinking about this, and I cannot remember if there is a valid answer to my questions, my classes in quantum physics probably never covered the question.

As we are taught, electrons do not fall into the nucleus because this would mean a specific location, and electrons therefore could never radiate energy due to the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. However, if this is true, how can nuetrons and protons be located to specific points in the center of atoms for this too would be violating the uncertainty principle. So how is the law not violated in the center of nuclei? For them not to violate it, there must be some oscillatory motion between protons and nuetrons as to never have specific locations in the center of atoms.

Anyone know?
I coloured in blue the part I want to answer. Nucleons are not point particles. Certainly, their location is more determinate than that of an electron, but, as JP wrote, they are more massive and this is the explanation. The Heisenberg' principle is really strong, it's very difficult to make an incorrect statement using it.
 

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The uncertainty principle and bound protons and neutrons
« Reply #25 on: 25/02/2011 15:20:36 »

 

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