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Author Topic: Is cell mutation possible?  (Read 5695 times)

Offline The Scientist

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Is cell mutation possible?
« on: 23/12/2010 08:42:24 »
Is it possible to make a cell mutate into another creature? Please share your views with us! Thanks!


 

Offline Variola

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Is cell mutation possible?
« Reply #1 on: 23/12/2010 11:50:02 »
???? A cell???
I am not sure what you mean. Methinks you have been watching too many old horror movies
 

Offline CliffordK

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Is cell mutation possible?
« Reply #2 on: 23/12/2010 12:04:58 »
Typically in biology, one discusses cell mutation with respect to random, and unpredictable changes.  It commonly occurs with radiation.

Usually mutations cause small changes.  In the case of cancer, a mutation can one cell line to take on characteristics of other cell lines of the same organism.  For example lung cells taking on characteristics of macrophages.

If the mutation occurs in the gametes, or early in the cellular replication of an organism, then unique characteristics might be expressed by the offspring.  Enough successive changes, and it might be considered a different organism than its ancestors.

Cloning research is based on artificially replacing 100% of the DNA in an egg cell with the DNA from another organism (usually from the same species, or perhaps a similar species).

One can also inject DNA into an organism.  For example, bacteria have been modified to produce "human" insulin that would be free from antigens from other animals, and free from human diseases.
 

Offline The Scientist

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Is cell mutation possible?
« Reply #3 on: 23/12/2010 12:09:33 »
Typically in biology, one discusses cell mutation with respect to random, and unpredictable changes.  It commonly occurs with radiation.

Usually mutations cause small changes.  In the case of cancer, a mutation can one cell line to take on characteristics of other cell lines of the same organism.  For example lung cells taking on characteristics of macrophages.

If the mutation occurs in the gametes, or early in the cellular replication of an organism, then unique characteristics might be expressed by the offspring.  Enough successive changes, and it might be considered a different organism than its ancestors.

Cloning research is based on artificially replacing 100% of the DNA in an egg cell with the DNA from another organism (usually from the same species, or perhaps a similar species).

One can also inject DNA into an organism.  For example, bacteria have been modified to produce "human" insulin that would be free from antigens from other animals, and free from human diseases.

Are there cases of big changes in the cell mutation?
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Is cell mutation possible?
« Reply #4 on: 24/12/2010 00:11:50 »
Mutations can occur on sections of DNA, for example where the base sequences on DNA are deleted or substituted, these are called point mutations. You can also have block mutations where the structure of entire chromosomes change (deletion, duplication, translocation...). Then there are changes in entire chromosome numbers, aneuploidy and polyploidy. For example, in humans there are 23 pairs of chromosomes. With aneuploidy you can have only one, three, or four copies of a single chromosome. With polyploidy, all the chromosomes are represented more than 3 times. As DNA 'controls' the functioning of the cell, mutations affects the cell
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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Is cell mutation possible?
« Reply #5 on: 24/12/2010 00:16:10 »
Of course I should also mention that some point mutations are harmless due to the degenerate nature of the amino acid 'code', for example GCU, GCC, GCA and GCG all translates to the amino acid 'alanine'
 

Offline CliffordK

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Is cell mutation possible?
« Reply #6 on: 28/12/2010 04:25:13 »
Of course I should also mention that some point mutations are harmless due to the degenerate nature of the amino acid 'code', for example GCU, GCC, GCA and GCG all translates to the amino acid 'alanine'

Much of the DNA fingerprinting is done in non-coding regions of the DNA which have higher variability than other regions.

If a particular gene is not expressed (for example in differentiated cells in a multicellular organism), then a mutation in that gene may also not be expressed in those previously differentiated cells.

Diploid Chromosomes may also protect from mutations in a single chromosome.
 

Offline mpt-matthew

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Is cell mutation possible?
« Reply #7 on: 12/01/2011 23:38:27 »
No.

E.g. us to randomly grow a banana plant on out arm instead of cancer.

Although the difference between our genome and a banana plants is small, the small bit which is different needs to be all most exactly the same as the actual plant for it to be able to grow.
There is almost no chance for the radiation to change out DNA into the correct sequence for another organism. It would just randomly jumble it and make it disfunction.

Also even if this did happen, (which it cant), a single cell wouldn't be able to grow on our bodies - we would destroy it.
 

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Is cell mutation possible?
« Reply #7 on: 12/01/2011 23:38:27 »

 

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