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Author Topic: Why is copper chloride green?  (Read 4213 times)

Marzy

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Why is copper chloride green?
« on: 13/01/2011 09:30:02 »
Marzy asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Why is copper chloride (CuCl2) green?

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 13/01/2011 09:30:02 by _system »


 

Offline Bored chemist

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Offline chris

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Why is copper chloride green?
« Reply #2 on: 14/01/2011 08:17:33 »
Although it can be:



This picture (from Wikipedia), shows a copper chloride solution prepared in the presence of (from left to right) increasing concentrations of chloride ions, which alters the chemistry and hence the colour of the solution.

Chris
 

Offline lightarrow

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Why is copper chloride green?
« Reply #3 on: 14/01/2011 11:12:55 »
Although it can be:



This picture (from Wikipedia), shows a copper chloride solution prepared in the presence of (from left to right) increasing concentrations of chloride ions, which alters the chemistry and hence the colour of the solution.

Chris
I have not seen the picture in wiki, but according to what I remember, it should be the reverse: [Cu++(H2O)] should become green and then yellow-green in presence of higher conc. of Cl-.
 

Offline Bill.D.Katt.

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Why is copper chloride green?
« Reply #4 on: 14/01/2011 14:56:16 »
I have not seen the picture in wiki, but according to what I remember, it should be the reverse: [Cu++(H2O)] should become green and then yellow-green in presence of higher conc. of Cl-.
[/quote]
I agree, I have made quite a bit of copper chloride for coloring flames. If my H2O2 depletes before the HCl does, the solutions is yellower. Before the crystals have dried, they are green. I never try to dry them past the dihydrate form, which is a light blue.
 

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Why is copper chloride green?
« Reply #4 on: 14/01/2011 14:56:16 »

 

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