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Author Topic: Does a charged particle moving at .95 c WRT a stationary observer emit radiation  (Read 1925 times)

Offline Ron Hughes

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Let's assume there is no radiation anywhere along it's path.


 

Offline Bored chemist

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It will if the refractive index of the medium is more than about 1.05
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherenkov_radiation
 

Offline Ron Hughes

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If true doesn't that suggest it would also radiate, albeit with enormously long wavelengths, at one meter per second?
 

Offline imatfaal

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That's the askaryan effect - when a particle (not necessarily charged)travels through a very dense dielectric faster than the speed of light through that particular material.  BC was pointing out the much more observable cherenkov radiation - there are lovely photos of the blue glow in nuclear reactors on the page he provided.

Askaryan effect happens through a creation of charged particles which then radiate in the microwave or radio - it has only been observed in solids, and seems to be a way of detecting neutrinos http://www.ps.uci.edu/~anita/.

I don't understand the "one meter per second" bit - the radiation will travel at whatever the speed of light is in that material, which is highly unlikely to be as low as 1 m/s
 

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