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Author Topic: Could you store an antiproton in a buckyball?  (Read 2267 times)

Offline hoford

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Could you store an antiproton in a buckyball?
« on: 29/01/2011 21:11:23 »
If trapped inside a spherical fullerenes would an Antiprotons stay there repelled by the electrons?
If so what would its half life be?

Any quantum mechanical engineers out there?
John


 

Online syhprum

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Could you store an antiproton in a buckyball?
« Reply #1 on: 29/01/2011 21:19:21 »
The largest problem storing Antiprotons is getting them cool enough they tend to zip around at thousands of kilometers per second.
 

Offline yor_on

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Could you store an antiproton in a buckyball?
« Reply #2 on: 01/02/2011 19:32:53 »
So many strange statements out there. Like anti matter producing pure energy? It produces gamma rays doesn't it? Like light but of a very high frequency? Never seen even a gram of 'pure energy' anywhere. And then that you can 'harvest' anti matter in Space? Also a weird one, where would those pockets be expected to be? And why would they be there, what would have produced them, 'virtual particles' or?

Also, sitting on a rocket propelled by gamma rays? What would the shielding consist of? Don't mistake that physicists can use magnetic traps to isolate antimatter with shielding a human from the subsequent gamma radiation produced in that 'space ship'. Sounds pretty much like gambling away your life to me. Consider the way hard radiation seems to 'age' any material it comes into contact with.  Photons of visible light have about 2 electron volts (ev), while medical x-ray photons may have energies of 50,000 ev and those of gamma rays reach 1,000,000 ev and even more.

There exist something called Magnetar's in the universe. "Such stars ( SGR 1806-20) in our galaxy (about 10 are known) sometimes emit gamma ray bursts. This one had previously emitted small bursts, and two appreciable events were recorded in 1979 and 1998, but the latest one outdid them by about a factor of 100.

How the gamma rays were produced can only be guessed, but magnetic energy must be involved--it also seems to be associated with to the acceleration of particles on the Sun, and particle acceleration is probably essential to the production of gamma rays. Some believe that stressed magnetic field lines, twisted by rotation (which is also enormously amplified when a star collapses) managed to suddenly "unwind" to some extent, like an overly wound-up spring working loose. The star is about 50,000 light years from Earth, and astrophysicists are beginning to wonder whether some short gamma ray bursts, detected from distant galaxies, might not represent similar events there." Maybe it's those that made some speculate about 'anti matter' pockets in space?

What all agrees on is that it would be hellishly expensive to produce it, and take a very long time to make anything of a useful amount. But buckyballs are cool.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Could you store an antiproton in a buckyball?
« Reply #3 on: 02/02/2011 00:21:17 »
Interesting Concept.

Since antimatter and antiprotons apparently readily interacts with ordinary matter (surrounded by electrons)...  I'm not sure a buckyball (or micelle) is any different. 

However, I'm seeing notes that C60 does tend to pick up an extra pair of electrons, and thus would have a slight electronegative charge, and thus might be useful.

It still is a big molecule, and constructing it around a single anti-proton in an otherwise perfect vacuum would be a feat.  It might be easier to create an electro-negative micelle.
 

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Could you store an antiproton in a buckyball?
« Reply #3 on: 02/02/2011 00:21:17 »

 

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