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Author Topic: Walking on water  (Read 6807 times)

Offline wolram

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Walking on water
« on: 02/03/2006 20:40:06 »
Several novel ideas have been tried but can you come up with a sensible
method ?

A born optomist


 

Offline neilep

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #1 on: 02/03/2006 21:02:48 »
Yes, visit your local ice rink ! :D


Well, apart from that, one has to make oneself lighter than water or be able to spread your weight equally over a large enough area so that the surface tension is supporting you.

Good luck in getting some good ideas.

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Offline Carolyn

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #2 on: 03/03/2006 01:32:12 »
When it rains or when I wash my car on my concrete driveway, I always get puddles.  If I step in the puddle, I'm walking on water.


Carolyn
« Last Edit: 03/03/2006 01:32:37 by Carolyn »
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #3 on: 03/03/2006 01:44:40 »
No sorry your walking in water :)

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Offline ariel

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #4 on: 03/03/2006 02:02:38 »
put some floaty things on your shoes!
 

Offline Mystericon

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #5 on: 03/03/2006 02:09:49 »
I saw a program; "Braniac: Science Abuse" with Richard Hammond, which by the way is brilliant and I recommend it anytime. Anyway the man filled a swimming pool with a yellow liquid known as Custard :D When the pool was eventually filled someone tried to walk across it, and voila they reached the other side. The consitency of the custard allowed more wieght to be distributed over a smaller surface area allowing the person to walk on custard. It's not water, but it is custard! :D
 

sharkeyandgeorge

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #6 on: 03/03/2006 10:50:48 »
sorry to correct you mysterican but it is not the consistancey of custard that enale you to walk on it but the fact that it is thixotropic and changes from liquid to a solid when force is applied. for quite a good kitchen experiment mix custard powder or corn flour and mix with a very little water when you cant stir it your there now you can pick it up in your hands shape it break it (it cracks like a solid) but keep it moving or it becomes a thin fluid and goes everywhere.

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Offline rosy

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #7 on: 03/03/2006 12:01:27 »
Actually, if people are being picky, cornflour is sheer thickening (thickens reversibly when a force is applied) rather than thixotropic. From here: http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/water/hyrhe.html
"Thixotropic liquids exhibit a time-dependent response to shear strain rate over a longer period than that associated with changes in the shear strain rate. They may liquefy on being shaken and then solidify (or not) when this has stopped."

Sorry, have been hit over the head with this one two many times when demonstrating to kids... blame the chemical engineers.
 

Offline Mystericon

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #8 on: 03/03/2006 12:53:02 »
[:p]

quote:
Originally posted by sharkeyandgeorge

sorry to correct you mysterican but it is not the consistancey of custard that enale you to walk on it but the fact that it is thixotropic and changes from liquid to a solid when force is applied. for quite a good kitchen experiment mix custard powder or corn flour and mix with a very little water when you cant stir it your there now you can pick it up in your hands shape it break it (it cracks like a solid) but keep it moving or it becomes a thin fluid and goes everywhere.

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Same difference :D
 

Offline wolram

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #9 on: 03/03/2006 13:20:41 »

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/4033725.stm

Well lizards can walk on water.

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Offline clouded.perception

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #10 on: 09/03/2006 07:19:13 »
Mystericon, there is nothing brilliant or even adequate about brainiac. It's just breasts, explosions, and a bunch of idiots pretending to do science (have you noticed that they don't even try to control their experiments properly?). Occasionally they say something interesting -- which you could get off the 'net by typing "science trivia" into the search engine. I stopped watching a while ago.

Although the thing where they put the group 1 elements in the bathtub was really cool.

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Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #11 on: 09/03/2006 16:57:17 »
Best one i've seen is a person inside a huge perspex globe, walking like a hamster on a treadmill.
http://www.faceplantwatertoys.com/sportsstuff-nuclear-globe-p-34.html

I was once sold some sandles, tha lady told me i could walk on water with these. Trouble is my feet got wet.

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Offline neilep

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #12 on: 09/03/2006 17:05:07 »
quote:
Originally posted by rosy

Actually, if people are being picky, cornflour is sheer thickening (thickens reversibly when a force is applied) rather than thixotropic. From here: http://www.lsbu.ac.uk/water/hyrhe.html
"Thixotropic liquids exhibit a time-dependent response to shear strain rate over a longer period than that associated with changes in the shear strain rate. They may liquefy on being shaken and then solidify (or not) when this has stopped."

Sorry, have been hit over the head with this one two many times when demonstrating to kids... blame the chemical engineers.




I remember seeing this on ' HOW ' about a million years ago..it really is quite fun !!..I think I like it better than my kids !!:)


...erhhm...I don't mean to say that I like cornflour over and above the love I have for my kids !!..Oh..you know what I meant !:D

Men are the same as women, just inside out !
« Last Edit: 09/03/2006 17:07:47 by neilep »
 

Offline Dr B

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #13 on: 09/03/2006 18:40:46 »
All you have to do is run at 8000 m/s ...

Dr B
Istanbul
 

Offline wolram

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Re: Walking on water
« Reply #14 on: 09/03/2006 18:58:27 »
quote:
Originally posted by Dr B

All you have to do is run at 8000 m/s ...

Dr B
Istanbul


Awww, come on Dr B, there must be an easier way.


A born optomist
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Walking on water
« Reply #14 on: 09/03/2006 18:58:27 »

 

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