The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Solar & Bio Hydrogen  (Read 4934 times)

Offline erich

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 91
    • View Profile
Solar & Bio Hydrogen
« on: 03/03/2006 07:39:29 »
What do ya'll think of these nano structured hydrogen efforts :

Titania Nanotube Arrays Harness Solar Energy
http://www.physorg.com/news10244.html

Direct Solar to Hydrogen:
Rupert Leach, Director, Newspath Ltd, from the UK posted me about his talking to the Chairman of Hydrogen Solar, Julian Keable http://www.hydrogensolar.com/index.html, saying that they will be well over 10% efficiency in the near future with their Tandem Cell™, technology, and that they had initial issues with scale-up, but these seem to have been overcome and they were sounding rather optimistic a few weeks ago.

OR: BIO Hydrogen:

Venter is back from his ocean cruse with the bugs he hopes will make all our fuel:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/02/26/AR2006022600932.html

And this company:

http://www.nanologix.net/index.php

"NanoLogix is a nanobiotechnology company that engages in the research, development, and commercialization of technologies for the production of bacteria, disease testing kits, alternative sources of fuel"

The NanoLogix breakthrough came about when the Company’s researchers were tinkering with its proprietary biological-based diagnostic and remediation technologies, noting that one of its patented bacterial culturing methods could produce byproduct gas surprisingly rich in hydrogen.

The implications are staggering - the world’s sustainability must increasingly rely upon biomass-based technologies because these processes use renewable resources. Unfortunately, biomass-based systems increase production of organic-matter wastewater. If treated by conventional waste treatment plants, this organic waste represents a costly economic and environmental liability.

“However, this same wastewater can also be viewed as an important potential resource for next-generation energy production,” says NanoLogix’s McClelland.

“The NanoLogix methodology for hydrogen generation is being developed for the limitless production of hydrogen from organic waste and wastewaters. Once fully proven, this has the potentiality for solving the world energy crisis through the limitless production of hydrogen from any waste organic byproduct, including sewage, and agricultural and food manufacturing waste.”

The bioreactor approach is scaling up.

Last year NanoLogix announced the results of a study that confirmed laboratory proof that its bioreactor system generates hydrogen in high yields via the use and adaptation of its intellectual property. In this study, the bioreactor produced biogas consisting of 50% hydrogen by volume, “without any trace of methane.”

“Part of the breakthrough was the absence of methane, which eliminates an additional costly step. If methane were present it would have required additional separation and hydrogen harvestation,” says McClelland.

McClelland believes that NanoLogix has discovered the most likely method for low cost production of massive quantities of hydrogen.

After last year’s study results were revealed the Company signed a feasibility study with the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering of Gannon University in Erie, PA to develop a bioreactor that utilizes NanoLogix's intellectual assets. The project team compromises a distinguished cohort of scientists and university professors who share a common vision.

In July of last year NanoLogix signed an agreement to generate hydrogen from a ‘scale-up’ bioreactor system installed at Mobilia Fruit Farms in rural Pennsylvania utilizing waste organic matter from the farm’s Arrowhead Wines unit.

An even bigger scale-up agreement, to install a hydrogen generation system using Welch Food's waste organic matter, followed shortly. Welch, of course, is the world's leading producer of grape and other fruit-based food products, giving NanoLogix virtually unlimited scale-up access to the waste-organics that McClelland believes will ultimately become the unlimited energy source of tomorrow.

McClelland is hopeful that these first scale-up installations will provide valuable data for engineering future systems. "We are clearly excited with the opportunity to demonstrate conclusively that the microbial production of hydrogen is efficient, inexpensive and can meet the increasing demand of both the industrial and commercial marketplaces," states McClelland.

Indeed, NanoLogix is the company to watch – they own the germs of a really big idea.


Efficiency is also good:

The Energy Blog: Sleek Aptera Hybrid Designed for 330 mpg
http://thefraserdomain.typepad.com/energy/2006/01/accelerated_com.html



Erich J. Knight


 

Offline daveshorts

  • Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2583
  • Physics, Experiments
    • View Profile
    • http://www.chaosscience.org.uk
Re: Solar & Bio Hydrogen
« Reply #1 on: 03/03/2006 21:51:24 »
If it is all above board, it still begs the question, it is more efficient than the microbial produciton of methane, which is very easy and a prooven technology.
 

Offline erich

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 91
    • View Profile
Re: Solar & Bio Hydrogen
« Reply #2 on: 14/03/2006 04:43:55 »
News on NNLX:       http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/060313/20060313005750.html?.v=1
SHARON, Pa., Mar 13, 2006 (BUSINESS WIRE) -- NanoLogix, Inc. (Pink Sheets:NNLX) announced today that the Company has completed the construction of its first commercial hydrogen bioreactor facility at a Welch's Food plant in North East, Pennsylvania. The company also announced that the facility will begin hydrogen generation from Welch's waste organic matter on or about the first of April 2006.


Hydrogen Solar sent me their current Tandum Cell numbers @ 10.2% efficiency: $1.50/Lb for H2
And they say a 22% efficiency is realistically achievable,ie... $0.75/lb of H2 which equals $0.049/KWhr equivalent


And the nano-dot approach to PVs also promises full spectrum conversion efficiencies along with clean production processes. ( UB News Services-solar nano-dots http://www.buffalo.edu/news/fast-ex...rticle=75000009 )"




Erich J. Knight
 

Offline erich

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 91
    • View Profile
Re: Solar & Bio Hydrogen
« Reply #3 on: 07/04/2006 23:24:40 »
I found a great forum on NNLX:
http://www.nanalyze.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=1253

I called the CEO:

The CEO of NNLX was very tight with the data I wanted, Said things like, I was asking the Wright brothers how much transatlantic air fares were going to cost. He did admit to the potential of it's upward scalability, saying that they have gotten their bugs to double every 23 to 44 minutes!

I was nervous, and don't think I got across to him what I've done with other companies like Borealis, Electron Power Systems, and Coolerado Cooler, and could do for him if I could just get some ballpark figures on installed costs, Efficiency numbers at different scales, and Lbs of H2 production / KWh energy inputs. I got nothing but non-discloser, non-discloser
He wouldn't give me his email, but took mine saying he would send tech updates as alouded.

(An Example of the benefit of high lighting these Companies technologies: My " New Manhattan Project for Clean Energy" article, on the sites that count viewing's, has been read by over 100,000, science savvy, self selected, folks.)

I tried..........
Erich J. Knight
 

Offline VAlibrarian

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 173
    • View Profile
Re: Solar & Bio Hydrogen
« Reply #4 on: 08/04/2006 02:52:28 »
I say again: reaching sustainable energy use is not about burning as much fossil fuel as we can for the next ten years while we tinker around with interesting but not necesarily practical gadgets that we think will solve all our problems.
No indeed, it is about taking action today to solve our problems, which include a melting ice cap on Greenland.  We cannot wait another ten years to address that one.

chris wiegard
 

Offline erich

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 91
    • View Profile
Re: Solar & Bio Hydrogen
« Reply #5 on: 08/07/2006 16:15:50 »
Erie Waste Water Treatment Plant has signed up:
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/060622/clth058.html?.v=54

Erich J. Knight
 

Offline youhadmeathello

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Re: Solar & Bio Hydrogen
« Reply #6 on: 21/07/2006 17:05:29 »
Dr. Bruce Logan, the Kappe professor of environmental engineering, the University of Pennsylvania, and an inventor of the microbial fuel cell.

Contact info: (818) 863-7908 blogan@psu.edu

If you do a search on bacteria hydrogen production this man's name comes up more than any other. He is local here in Pennsylvania and not far from Erie.

Has Nanologix, Inc. made an effort to contact him for collaboration? He works with companies (Ion Power, Inc. for example) and an announcement of collaboration would probably send the stock over $2.50 a share in the short term and over $10.00 in less than 2 years.

I'm sure that NNLX could float a PPO to raise a couple of million dollars to get him. It would be like signing Albert Einstein to your nuclear energy research project or Mozart to write the score for your next movie production.

Even if you could not get him, if you got one of his more senior protégés you would still bump the stock very quickly.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Solar & Bio Hydrogen
« Reply #6 on: 21/07/2006 17:05:29 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums