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Author Topic: Who was the first to describe nanobacteria?  (Read 7107 times)

Offline JimBob

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Who was the first to describe nanobacteria?
« on: 09/03/2006 18:25:09 »
Nanobacteria have been cussed and discussed for a while now. They are starting to be taken seriously for the last three or four years and are believed by the Mayo Clinic to be a seious element in coranay arterioschlerosis. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/05/040525060705.htm)

Who was the scientist to first describe nanobacteria?

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Offline Ray hinton

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Re: Who was the first to describe nanobacteria?
« Reply #1 on: 11/03/2006 00:28:21 »
quote:
Now a team of doctors has entered the fray surrounding the existence or otherwise of nanobacteria. After four years' work, the team, based at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, has come up with some of the best evidence yet that they do exist.



did you get that right or what !!

its the drugs,y-know.
 

Offline Hadrian

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Re: Who was the first to describe nanobacteria?
« Reply #2 on: 13/03/2006 18:07:40 »
Wow that is truly amazing (if small) stuff.

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Offline Hadrian

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Re: Who was the first to describe nanobacteria?
« Reply #3 on: 13/03/2006 18:45:18 »
I came across this

ROBERT L. FOLK Note 1

Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712, USA

Received February 11, 1997, published March 4, 1997
Summary: Nannobacteria are very small living creatures in the 0.05 to 0.2 micrometer range. They are enormously abundant in minerals and rocks, and probably run most of the earth’s surface chemistry. Although I conjecture that they form most of the world’s biomass, they remain "biota incognita" to the biological world as their genetic relationships, metabolism, and other characteristics remain to be investigated.


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Offline Hadrian

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Re: Who was the first to describe nanobacteria?
« Reply #4 on: 13/03/2006 18:46:36 »
A Brief History of Nannobacteria
Nannobacteria in minerals were born in 1990 when Bob Folk, during high magnification SEM study of hot springs carbonates, discovered tiny 25-200 nm scale spheroidal and ovoid shaped objects in the calcite and aragonite. Because of the general resemblance between these objects and eubacterial Cocci, Bacilli, Streptococci, and Staphylococci, and because of their tendency to occur in chains or clusters, it was initially proposed that the objects were "dwarf forms," about one-tenth the diameter of ordinary of bacteria, "nannobacteria" (sic) (Folk, 1992; 1993a), or their fossilized equivalents, "nanofossils" (McKay et al., 1996). Since then, these nanometer-scale objects have been hypothesized as fossilized microbes in terrestrial carbonates, sulfides, oxides, clays, and other silicates (Folk, 1992, 1993a, 1993b; Pedone and Folk, 1996; Vasconcelos and McKenzie, 1997; Sillitoe et al., 1996; Folk and Lynch, 1997), and in extra-terrestrial rocks, including Martian meteorite ALH84001, and Allende and Murchison carbonaceous meteorites (McKay et al, 1996; Folk and Lynch, 1997, 1998; Folk et al., 1998). Similar nanometer-scale spheroids have been found in mammalian blood and evidence has been presented that they are cytotoxic both in vitro and in vivo (Akerman et al., 1993; Çiftçioglu and Kajander, 1998; Çiftçioglu et al, 1997; Kajander et al., 1997), they may play a role in tissue calcification (Kajander and Çiftçioglu, 1998) and they have been detected in human dental calculus, and arterial plaque.


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« Last Edit: 13/03/2006 18:53:52 by Hadrian »
 

Offline JimBob

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Re: Who was the first to describe nanobacteria?
« Reply #5 on: 15/03/2006 01:50:27 »
Hadrian

Right-oh. old chap! How long did you have to search for it? I first met Bob in 1962 when I became a student at UT. He had just gotten out of the hospital for a case of hepatitus he contracted in Latin or South America doing field work. To rest between classes he had hung up a hammock (from his adventures to the south) in his office and lay in it. I know this because he always kept his office door open and it was in the main hall of the old geology building. His door is STILL always open and students can just come in and chat if they want to discuss anything that has purpose for them. He is one of the world's leading authorities on carbonate petrology. He wrote my sedimentary petrology textbook - very complete, even today.

He is one of my favorite people. AND he has a personallity very similar to DcotorBeaver. Watch out!

JB

If I only had a little humility, I'd be perfect.
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Offline Hadrian

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Re: Who was the first to describe nanobacteria?
« Reply #6 on: 15/03/2006 11:09:15 »
I am an eclectic absorber of information. I had heard of his work some years ago but I had forgotten his name. I thought at the time it would lead to a new level of understanding of life and how it thrives through out our universe. Personally I believe there if a lot more life out there then we can imagine.

Anyway I am banging on again….. sorry   it took me under two minutes to find him. I am working on a book so I have being doing a lot of research over the last 3 years and I got good at it.  


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Re: Who was the first to describe nanobacteria?
« Reply #6 on: 15/03/2006 11:09:15 »

 

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