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Author Topic: How brain-cells store memoryes?  (Read 4255 times)

Offline Heikki Rinnemaa

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« on: 03/03/2011 20:27:42 »
MoHei. :)

I have wondering and thinking coupple year that how my brains can store memoryes,,etc.

I have one idea.  [:I]

All information which comes through my eyes is some kind small-matter particle motion-flowing and goes through my eyes to my brain-cells,,and store in the cells.

And i think that this small-matter-particles size is much smaller than atom-theory suppose that electron is,,,

?




 

Offline Heikki Rinnemaa

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #1 on: 06/03/2011 05:58:33 »
I made picture of that my thoughs.



 

Offline yamo

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #2 on: 10/04/2011 08:30:33 »
I think memory is not so much a matter of storage as perception.  Most of us are only able to perceive the past and present which exist as much as the future.  Some people perceive the future but i think only the future that they experience.  No ghosties...just perception of non present events just the way most people perceive the past when they are not in the past.  Since the future cannot be changed no evolutionary benefit is gained by perceiving the future.  It is possible that no evolutionary advantage has been gained by perceiving the past.  It just hasn't killed us...as a species.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #3 on: 10/04/2011 19:12:50 »
"Some people perceive the future but i think only the future that they experience. "
Could you find one who can perceive next weeks lottery numbers please?
" It is possible that no evolutionary advantage has been gained by perceiving the past.  "
Knowing what happened last time is a huge advantage,
 

Offline grizelda

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #4 on: 12/04/2011 09:33:42 »
Since our memories are of events selected by our emotional awareness of them, and our emotions are produced by neurotransmitters, we should be able to remember them by recreating the neurotransmitter levels (emotions) that were originally coincident with the events. So the brain should be able to maintain a table of the neurotransmitter levels along with cross references to associated memories also in the table. Sort of the same way language itself cross references words to related words such as puns.
 

Offline JMLCarter

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #5 on: 13/04/2011 23:34:05 »
You probably want to read up on;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neural_network

Another interesting aspect is the maths of inductive reasoning;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inductive_logic#Inductive_inference

In terms of physiology, the indications are that adjustment in synapse transmission of neural impulses and the growth of new neural synapses constructs a neural network that adjusts to make rewarding inductive inferences. Different parts of the brain inherit different physiology and structure genetically to some extent, which gives them different roles. The learning process tunes the synapses to make them good at the roles.

(I hope you didn't want a short answer... ...they say it is the most complex "machine" known to man.)
« Last Edit: 13/04/2011 23:35:36 by JMLCarter »
 

Offline Heikki Rinnemaa

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #6 on: 21/05/2011 06:14:12 »
My theory that question was,,is,,,

All information which comes through my eyes is some kind small-matter particle motion-flowing and goes through my eyes to my brain-cells,,and store in the cells.

And i think that this small-matter-particles size is much smaller than atom-theory suppose that electron is,,,

 

Offline CliffordK

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #7 on: 22/05/2011 05:27:43 »
Heikki,

I think you've over simplified things significantly.

The brain does a significant amount of information transformation. 

For example, with vision, a photon enters the eye and interacts with one of 3 types of cone cells, or a rod cell. 

Then, if the light is of the proper wavelength, the rod or cone will send out an action potential down its axon. 

This then gets transmitted to several dendrites of the next level of cells through synapses, and information processing begins even before the information even leaves the retina.  More synapses occur as the information is transmitted to the occipital lobe of the brain, with cells specialized for line detection, edge detection, contrast sensitivity, and etc.  Perhaps up to the proverbial "Grandmother Cell" which fires for your grandmother. 

After the initial photon, each successive synapse takes an electrical pulse in an axon, releases chemical neurotransmitters which are received by the neighboring dendrite in the next cell, and initiates electrical changes in that cell.  If it doesn't meet a threshold, nothing happens.  If it does meet a threshold, an action potential is initiated in that cell's axon, and the process is propagated. 

An action potential isn't a single electron either, but rather is the movement of multiple sodium and potassium ions propagating an electrical pulse down the axon.

Memories and learning is a little more complicated, and are thought to be the rewiring of the axon/dendrite connections, as JMLCarter said with Neural Networks.

You show a picture of DNA, but most of the changes would involve protein and structural changes.
 

Offline Heikki Rinnemaa

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #8 on: 22/05/2011 06:44:40 »
Heikki,


For example, with vision, a photon enters the eye and interacts with one of 3 types of cone cells, or a rod cell. 

Then, if the light is of the proper wavelength, the rod or cone will send out an action potential down its axon. 

After the initial photon, each successive synapse takes an electrical pulse in an axon, releases chemical neurotransmitters which are received by the neighboring dendrite in the next cell, and initiates electrical changes in that cell.  If it doesn't meet a threshold, nothing happens.  If it does meet a threshold, an action potential is initiated in that cell's axon, and the process is propagated. 



My thought is that "image" information,,means small particles,,, goes through those cone-cells to brain cells.

And those particles,,photons,,,colortons,,,etc ,,,are smaller matter-particle than atom-theory suppose that one electron is,,,

I mean that atom-theory and electricity-neuron theory is not the right story that question,,,how brain cells store images,,,

I dont have hmm,,"atom-theory" of that question,,,only the observe-theory,,ant my observe-theory says;

Image flowing motion
- Wave-theory is wrong story
- All is matter-particle-flowing-motion
- And i dont see any reason why image-flowing-motion dont goes in the brain to brain-cell,,,

Hmm,example,,migren,,,tells us that easily,,bright-light-pulse goes through eyes-cells to brain-cells and cause headache,,and those saw-images on the mind-eye.

But,this is theory,,and my opinion,,and cannot found to read any school-books all scientist articles.





 

Offline CliffordK

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #9 on: 22/05/2011 19:51:16 »
There are certainly some aspects of light that can be absorbed through the skin.  For example you can feel the warmth, and the light is part of the production of Vitamin D.

However, when discussing the eyes, it is all information processing and conversion.

Even consider your camera (also in the picture).  Light comes in, focused through lenses, it eventually hits a detector which converts the light to electrical energy.  This then is stored in memory on the camera.  But, a BMP image is very unwieldy, so it typically compresses the datastream into something such as a JPG, GIF, or PNG format which is much smaller.  Eventually it will be converted from volatile to non-volatile memory, and perhaps even stored as magnetic pulses on a hard drive.  Your camera, however, can not recognize aspects of the image such as the bridge and arches in the photo.  That takes additional processing usually done in a computer with very complex computer programs. 

So, the rods and cones in the eyes absorb the light photons...  at which point the energy gets converted to an electrical pulse which is propagated with the deliberate movement of many positive cations rather than negative electrons.  Synapses transform the energy from an electrical pulse to chemical neurotransmitters, and back to electrical potential difference.  And, starting in the retina, there is information integration, so to detect a line, multiple neighboring cells must contribute information.

As far as light sensitivity in a migraine, again, it is not the photons getting to the brain, but rather stimulation of multiple neurons.

If you think of a PET scan or a FMRI, they both measure brain activity based on blood flow.  So, you might expect that light could cause more activity in areas of the brain, and thus more blood flow and exacerbating things like headaches.
 

Offline Heikki Rinnemaa

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #10 on: 25/05/2011 03:24:06 »
So, the rods and cones in the eyes absorb the light photons...  at which point the energy gets converted to an electrical pulse which is propagated with the deliberate movement of many positive cations rather than negative electrons.  Synapses transform the energy from an electrical pulse to chemical neurotransmitters, and back to electrical potential difference.  And, starting in the retina, there is information integration, so to detect a line, multiple neighboring cells must contribute information.
----

What is electricity,,,matter-particle flow-motion.

What is absorb?
 

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How brain-cells store memoryes?
« Reply #10 on: 25/05/2011 03:24:06 »

 

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