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Author Topic: Human endurance  (Read 5033 times)

Offline wolram

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Human endurance
« on: 15/03/2006 21:17:04 »
Just how far can a human travel under his/her own steam, with or
without mechanical assistance in 24 hrs?

I am not talking about any un human powered method of travel.

A born optomist
« Last Edit: 15/03/2006 21:20:14 by wolram »


 

Offline Hadrian

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #1 on: 15/03/2006 21:30:32 »
World Record
24hr 243,656 m
Sigrid Lomsky GER
IAU European Championships SUI 05/01/93


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Offline neilep

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #2 on: 15/03/2006 21:34:06 »
I suppose it all depends on the circumstances, altitude, heat, humidity, climate etc
If they are in free fall then quite a long way :-)

The average walking speed is what...4-5mph ?...and then sprinting 25mph ?, jogging 10-15mph ?....assuming no breaks for drink wee wee and poo poos :-) then I would hazard a guess at somewhere between 100-150 miles before they collapse and die !!

This is one for daveshorts...he just luffs to work these things out !!
« Last Edit: 15/03/2006 21:34:43 by neilep »
 

Offline Hadrian

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #3 on: 15/03/2006 21:51:56 »
243,656 m = 151.40053 miles

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Offline wolram

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #4 on: 15/03/2006 22:00:16 »
quote:
Originally posted by neilep

I suppose it all depends on the circumstances, altitude, heat, humidity, climate etc
If they are in free fall then quite a long way :-)

The average walking speed is what...4-5mph ?...and then sprinting 25mph ?, jogging 10-15mph ?....assuming no breaks for drink wee wee and poo poos :-) then I would hazard a guess at somewhere between 100-150 miles before they collapse and die !!

This is one for daveshorts...he just luffs to work these things out !!



Hummm, so how far could a nappy wearing roller skater travel?

A born optomist
 

Offline wolram

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #5 on: 15/03/2006 22:17:23 »

Thinking a little more, a bicycle could have some sort of electricaly
driven system that is charged on down hill sections, that would be in
my (rules) as long as there was no energy in the battery to start with.

A born optomist
 

Offline Hadrian

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #6 on: 15/03/2006 22:22:58 »
Quote
Originally posted by wolram


Thinking a little more, a bicycle could have some sort of electricaly
driven system that is charged on down hill sections, that would be in
my (rules) as long as there was no energy in the battery to start with.

how about a car or then again a rocket:D

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another_someone

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #7 on: 15/03/2006 22:36:54 »
quote:
Originally posted by neilep

I suppose it all depends on the circumstances, altitude, heat, humidity, climate etc
If they are in free fall then quite a long way :-)

The average walking speed is what...4-5mph ?...and then sprinting 25mph ?, jogging 10-15mph ?....assuming no breaks for drink wee wee and poo poos :-) then I would hazard a guess at somewhere between 100-150 miles before they collapse and die !!

This is one for daveshorts...he just luffs to work these things out !!



I think those speeds are for a fit, not an average, human being.

About 3-4 mph is average walking speed.

What you have excluded is the distance that might be covered by use of a bicycle (Robin did allow for mechanical aids, so long as the sole source of power was human).  I think bicycles are probably one of the most efficient forms of long distance human powered travel, particularly if you are travelling on paved roads (and even more so if you can design proper streamlining around the bicycle).

http://www.ultracycling.com/records/records2005.html
quote:

Arizona E-W



Derek Slife, 24, Chandler, AZ, Senior
May 14, 2005, Official: Mark Chesney

Start: I-40 on NM-AZ border
Finish: AZ Hwy 68 on AZ/CA border

345.9 mi, 23:03, 15.01 mph


Utah S-N


Fred Boethling, 60, Boulder, CA & Dan Crain, 60, Irvine, CA
May 28, 2005, Official: Ryan Pohanic

Start: US 89A on AZ/UT border
Finish: UT Hwy 150 on UT/WY border

382.9 mi, 21:47, 17.67 mph



In other words, 346 miles in just over 23 hours on a bicycle across Arizona, or 383 miles in under 22 hours across Utah.



George
« Last Edit: 15/03/2006 22:37:40 by another_someone »
 

another_someone

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #8 on: 15/03/2006 22:39:55 »
quote:
Originally posted by wolram


Thinking a little more, a bicycle could have some sort of electricaly
driven system that is charged on down hill sections, that would be in
my (rules) as long as there was no energy in the battery to start with.

A born optomist



You didn't mention anything about hills before the best way to go for an endurance record is over flat ground.

Electrical energy storage systems are a nice idea, but in their present level of development, I suspect they would carry too much of a weight penalty to be worth the advantage they might bring.



George
 

Offline wolram

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #9 on: 15/03/2006 22:43:18 »
Wow, AS, 383 MILES, that would take some beating.

A born optomist
 

Offline wolram

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #10 on: 15/03/2006 22:47:35 »


You didn't mention anything about hills before the best way to go for an endurance record is over flat ground.

Electrical energy storage systems are a nice idea, but in their present level of development, I suspect they would carry too much of a weight penalty to be worth the advantage they might bring.

Yes and i guess any charging would slow the bicycle, thus  negating any
advantage.

A born optomist
« Last Edit: 15/03/2006 22:52:15 by wolram »
 

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Re: Human endurance
« Reply #10 on: 15/03/2006 22:47:35 »

 

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