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Author Topic: If we build too many Wind farms is there a danger we would slow the earth down?  (Read 5975 times)

Offline GlentoranMark

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Would the rotation of the Earth be slowed if we pulled all the energy from the winds?


 

Offline lab monkey

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I don't think it would - it's not wind that causes the rotation of the Earth.
 

Offline GlentoranMark

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Energy's being transferred from one source to another, surely there's some effect? Less storms, rain etc?

Thanks for the answer, BTW.
 

Offline Geezer

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You are right in thinking we can't get something for nothing, but winds have a lot more to do with solar heating than the Earth's rotation. Wind energy is really another way of capturing solar energy.
 

Offline CliffordK

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I've been thinking of this.
Reports is that wind farms don't slow down the wind.  Although, in the next century we could see the scale of the wind farms increase significantly. 

Wind direction can be either with earth's direction of rotation (from East to West), or opposite to the direction of rotation (West to East), depending on the time of day and other factors.  So, in theory one might speed the earth rather than slowing it, but it probably all averages out.

As far as appreciably slowing the wind.  Most of the windmills only capture a small fraction of the wind.  And, they do nothing to get rid of the underlying high to low pressure systems. So, the effect is likely very minimal.
 

Offline Jolly- Joliver

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Would the rotation of the Earth be slowed if we pulled all the energy from the winds?

Interesting question, I do not believe that there is any relation, between the turning of the earth and wind, simply thinking about it wind moves in all directions, we spin in one direction(wobble on our axis).

Are you thinking we could like, move to another Solar system? Maybe we shouldn't joke about it, the flat earth society might start demanding they are turned off just incase.
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 01:12:49 by Wiybit »
 

Offline Geezer

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I do not believe that there is any relation, between the turning of the earth and wind,


Then you'd be wrong. Why do you think weather systems in the upper and lower hemispheres rotate in opposite directions?
 

Offline Madidus_Scientia

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Well we've already built far more buildings that slow down wind than we ever will windmills, and long before that there's been cliffs and trees and mountains.
 

Offline Jolly- Joliver

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I do not believe that there is any relation, between the turning of the earth and wind,


Then you'd be wrong. Why do you think weather systems in the upper and lower hemispheres rotate in opposite directions?

Umm why would the the weather systems north and south of the equator turn in opposite directions, when the earth turns in one direction?

Surely they would both turn in the same direction, if it was soley down to the earths spin?

Well there is magnetics that changes the north and south, the earth spins on a axis, meaning that the lower hemisphere is more shielded from the solar winds, and the upper hemisphere would bare the brunt, north would be slightly hotter and the south slightly cooler, the moon also may play it's role with the tides and pressure changes, and evaporation from the sun ofcourse, gravation might play more of a role on the lower hemisphere than the northern also, but that could be minial really I "Think". 

These things are always interconnected so, not being a wether man, I'm not entirely sure but I don't "think" it's down to the earths spin so much, Magnetics I think would be playing more of a role, the magnetic influence on the gas atoms. 



Or do you actually mean Why would the troposphere and stratosphere turn in different directions?


I will assume that the mesosphere, thermosphere and exosphere are more influenced by the solar winds and fiction.

Umm, reducing friction on the statusphere, leaving it to be more influenced by gravity, so turn in a direction the same as the earth, where as the troposhere wouldn't be and other factors like the moon, magnetics, evaporation, would all play greater roles, in conjunction with the spin of the earth.

Which ever it was you meant they are my answers.

 
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 12:29:19 by Wiybit »
 

Offline Madidus_Scientia

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Umm why would the the weather systems north and south of the equator turn in opposite directions, when the earth turns in one direction?

Surely they would both turn in the same direction, if it was soley down to the earths spin?

No, different directions. The mirror image of a word is in a different direction, the same will apply with the coriolis effect.

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Well there is magnetics that changes the north and south

The earth has a magnetic field yes, what do you mean by "changes the north and south"?

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the earth spins on a axis, meaning that the lower hemisphere is more shielded from the solar winds

Why?

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and the upper hemisphere would bare the brunt, north would be slightly hotter and the south slightly cooler

What do you think is happening when the seasons change?

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gravation might play more of a role on the lower hemisphere than the northern also

Why?

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These things are always interconnected so, not being a wether man, I'm not entirely sure but I don't "think" it's down to the earths spin so much, Magnetics I think would be playing more of a role, the magnetic influence on the gas atoms. 

How does magnetism effect gas atoms?

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Umm, reducing friction on the statusphere, leaving it to be more influenced by gravity, so turn in a direction the same as the earth

Gravity pulls down, not sideways.

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where as the troposhere wouldn't be

If there was some effect why wouldn't it apply to the troposphere too?
 

Offline Jolly- Joliver

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Umm why would the the weather systems north and south of the equator turn in opposite directions, when the earth turns in one direction?

Surely they would both turn in the same direction, if it was soley down to the earths spin?

No, different directions. The mirror image of a word is in a different direction, the same will apply with the coriolis effect.

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Well there is magnetics that changes the north and south

The earth has a magnetic field yes, what do you mean by "changes the north and south"?

just that the north and south have opposites.


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the earth spins on a axis, meaning that the lower hemisphere is more shielded from the solar winds

Why?

because the top part would be more exposed.

 


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and the upper hemisphere would bare the brunt, north would be slightly hotter and the south slightly cooler

What do you think is happening when the seasons change?

The earth orbital postion changes the earths postion relative to the sun. the southern hemisphere is more exposed during its summer, but I still think that the shape of the sphere gives it a lower impact and the higher a greater, even if it is more exposed during the northern winter.




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gravation might play more of a role on the lower hemisphere than the northern also

Why?

A later add on I was thinking about space time and gravitation imprints having an impact, the curvature of space impacting on the lower hemisphere in some way. But I was just musing.



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These things are always interconnected so, not being a wether man, I'm not entirely sure but I don't "think" it's down to the earths spin so much, Magnetics I think would be playing more of a role, the magnetic influence on the gas atoms. 

How does magnetism effect gas atoms?

How would I know, it was a hypothetical statement, as I said I'm not a wether man, not that wether men would know the impact of magnetism on atoms, I cant believe there is no effect at all tho.



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Umm, reducing friction on the stratosphere, leaving it to be more influenced by gravity, so turn in a direction the same as the earth

Gravity pulls down, not sideways.

Arrr yes it will pull down, but if its turning at the same time it could pull down diagonally, causing a movement sideways.


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where as the troposphere wouldn't be

If there was some effect why wouldn't it apply to the troposphere too?

Yes of course but I was thinking that other effects like the sea and heat from the sun and other things would cause the troposphere to be more chaotic, so influenced by more variables than the stratosphere, which would be calmer and so under a greater influence of gravity as a result.

To say the influence would be equal in both yet have a greater effect, in the upper then the lower because of the extra things going on in the lower.

But I'm just musing and amusing myself and others that actually know the answers to these questions.

Thanks for the name he clearly meant the latter.
http://ww2010.atmos.uiuc.edu/(Gh)/guides/mtr/fw/crls.rxml
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 15:22:17 by Wiybit »
 

Offline Jolly- Joliver

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I found an interesting little film on you tube:-

I don't know if the round about would stop if you put to many wind mills on it tho.

Actaully I think it would, Nice experiment, how small would the winds mill have to be, to represent the windwills we use to get wind power? I'm just asking.

I dont know the flat earth society would except the results tho? They don't like science apparently.
« Last Edit: 03/04/2011 15:33:32 by Wiybit »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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The law of conservation of angular momentum says that we can't change the spin of the earth unless we alter it's shape or mass.

What the windmills might do is alter the nature of the weather systems.
 

Offline Jolly- Joliver

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The law of conservation of angular momentum says that we can't change the spin of the earth unless we alter it's shape or mass.


The shape of it's mass does that mean skyscrapers could? All building change the shape of the earth mass don't they, in tiny ways?

Sure it's not the actual mass, only by changing the actual mass could change the earths spin?
 

Offline Geezer

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The law of conservation of angular momentum says that we can't change the spin of the earth unless we alter it's shape or mass.


The shape of it's mass does that mean skyscrapers could? All building change the shape of the earth mass don't they, in tiny ways?

Sure it's not the actual mass, only by changing the actual mass could change the earths spin?

Yes. Constructing skyscrapers will actually slow the Earth's rotation rate, but the effect will be too small to even detect. Also, a lot of material is being eroded from mountains all the time, and that will have the opposite effect.

It's the same effect as a skater spinning on ice. As they move their arms and legs closer to their axis of rotation, they spin noticeably faster.
 

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