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Author Topic: Fractals in Chemistry  (Read 4627 times)

Offline SigmaPrime

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Fractals in Chemistry
« on: 23/03/2006 05:36:55 »
Is it possible for the patterns of fractals to be used to identify known and unknown substances?


 

Offline SigmaPrime

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Re: Fractals in Chemistry
« Reply #1 on: 24/03/2006 01:15:14 »
I hope Chris reads this
 

Offline daveshorts

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Re: Fractals in Chemistry
« Reply #2 on: 24/03/2006 09:51:42 »
You would have to come up with a fractal system which was dependent on the substance. Do you have any in mind?
 

ROBERT

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Re: Fractals in Chemistry
« Reply #3 on: 24/03/2006 16:22:22 »
These crystals are recognisable as caffeine from their fractal form:-




CREDIT:SINCLAIR STAMMERS / SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY
http://www.sciencephoto.com/search/searchLogic.html?searchstring=caffeine&country=67
Caption:-
Polarised light micrograph of crystals of caffeine, a stimulant present in coffee and tea.
 Magnification: x80 at 35mm size.
« Last Edit: 24/03/2006 16:33:58 by ROBERT »
 

Offline SigmaPrime

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Re: Fractals in Chemistry
« Reply #4 on: 24/03/2006 21:13:20 »
Hmm do you have an image of their fractal form as well as more important on that topic? This looks quite promising!

I do not have a fractal system in mind. This is something that interests me and I've created fractals in the past through the electrodeposition of solid.

I hope to do this for my extended essay (IB program)
« Last Edit: 24/03/2006 21:28:05 by SigmaPrime »
 

ROBERT

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Re: Fractals in Chemistry
« Reply #5 on: 27/03/2006 16:43:29 »
The crystals themselves are fractal: their microscopic and macroscopic forms are similar.
Crystals are formed by repeatedly adding the the same primitive elements in the same way.

" Definition of Fractal
A word coined by Benoit Mandelbrot in 1975 to describe shapes that are "self-similar" -- that is, shapes that look the same at different magnifications. To create a fractal, you start with a simple shape and duplicate it successively according to a set of fixed rules. Oddly enough, such a simple formula for creating shapes can produce very complex structures, some of which have a striking resemblance to objects that appear in the real world. For example, graphics designers use fractals to generate images of mountainous landscapes, coastlines, and flowers."
http://www.angelfire.com/anime3/internet/graphics.htm



« Last Edit: 27/03/2006 17:19:59 by ROBERT »
 

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Re: Fractals in Chemistry
« Reply #5 on: 27/03/2006 16:43:29 »

 

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