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Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #25 on: 27/01/2009 11:21:31 »
Back in 1995, The theory predicted MS was likely to respond to Inclined Bed Therapy based on the feedback from a simple questionnaire asking about environmental factors, including where a person was living when first diagnosed. Low laying river valley areas and coastal areas, or places where mist hung over long after other areas where cleared revealed a surprising correlation with humidity.  Localised humidity was also included in the questionnaire to reveal if a problem with in house damp, mould were a problem for people with MS. Things like taking a hot shower could trigger a relapse. Drying washing indoors on clotheshorse or worse radiators was also surprisingly commonplace. Having a kitchen or bathroom upstairs for instance and sleeping accommodation downstairs where heavy water laden air could move down stairs to the bedroom was another worthy consideration and poor ventilation together with double glazing added to humidity. Hence a dehumidifier in such places was recommended together with an inclined bed. Pauline, the lady mentioned previously who regained her sight confirmed this connection with humidity by noting a dropped foot problem would be gone in the morning when a dehumidifier was used and back again on a morning when it was not used and the weather was damp or humid.

Alun, who has provided us with excellent pictures showing how his varicose veins have and are still improving using IBT may not seem relevant to people with multiple sclerosis, without reading carefully the study in the PDF file from my previous post.

Within that file you will see a correlation with a swollen twisted / kinked vein next to the spine shown clearly in the pictures provided in the file.

I still maintain that MS is a circulation problem and now we for the first time have evidence that corroborates this theory and more to the point shows why so many people with multiple sclerosis found huge benefits from sleeping on a slope rather than sleeping flat.

Copy and print both the pdf file and the following file and read carefully. Here you will see the true picture of why sleeping flat is not only causing varicose veins to swell and oedema to form but causing the veins inside the body to swell and twist. Change the pressures inside the veins and you have a good chance of substantial recovery from MS and many other neurological and non-neurological medical conditions.
I have been saying this for far too long now. It is about time something was done to make this available to people who need to regain a decent quality of life.
http://curezone.com/upload/Members/New02/Andrew_K_Fletcher/RAISED_BED_SURVEY.rtf


http://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/rapidpdf/jnnp.2008.157164v1.pdf
Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis
Paolo Zamboni 1*, Roberto Galeotti 1, Erica Menegatti 1, Anna M Malagoni 1, Giovanna Tacconi 1, Sergio Dall'ara 1, Ilaria Bartolomei 2 and Fabrizio Salvi 2

1 Vascular Diseases Center, University of Ferrara, Italy
2 Neurology, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy

Accepted 10 November 2008


*     Abstract

Background: The extracranial venous outflow routes in clinically defined multiple sclerosis (CDMS) have never been investigated.

Methods: Sixty-five patients affected by CDMS, and 235 controls composed, respectively, of healthy subjects, healthy subjects older than CDMS patients, patients affected by other neurological diseases, and older controls not affected by neurological diseases but scheduled for venography (HAV-C), blindly underwent a combined transcranial and extracranial Color-Doppler high-resolution examination (TCCS-ECD) aimed at detecting at least two of five parameters of anomalous venous outflow. According to the TCCS-ECD screening, patients and HAV-C further underwent selective venography of the azygous and jugular venous system with venous pressure measurement.

Results: CDMS and TCCS-ECD venous outflow anomalies were dramatically associated (OR 43, 95% CI 29-65, p<0.0001). Subsequently, venography demonstrated in CDMS, and not in controls, the presence of multiple severe extracranial stenosis, affecting the principal cerebrospinal venous segments; it configures a picture of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) with four different patterns of distribution of stenosis and substitute circle. Moreover, relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive courses were associated to CCSVI patterns significantly different from those of primary progressive (p<0.0001). Finally, the pressure gradient measured across the venous stenosies was slightly but significantly higher.

Conclusion: CDMS is strongly associated with CCSVI, a picture never been described so far, characterized by abnormal venous haemodynamics determined by extracranial multiple venous strictures of unknown origin. The location of venous obstructions plays a key role in determining the clinical course of the disease.

This paper is very exciting for myself and people with multiple sclerosis.

http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview/id/271074.html here is another doctor who is convinced that MS is caused or at least contributed to by fluctuations in venous pressure. Franz Alfons Schelling, MD


 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #26 on: 21/02/2009 18:33:43 »
Dear Mr Fletcher, thank you so much for raising my bed. I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis twenty six years ago and have been paralysed many times.

Before raising my bed (April 96)

1.   I had muscle spasm in my legs, especially in the morning and at night.
2.   I had problems walking with weakness in my right leg. I was shaky and needed a stick.
3.   I had a muscle weakness in my left eye.
4.   I had a painful lump on my calf muscle which was growing, an orthopaedic condition (osteochondrmatosis which results in oedema). I had difficulty with my ankle and on-going physiotherapy was essential.
5.   I was suffering weight loss.
6.   I had asthma and used inhalers.
7.   I had bad sinusitis and needed physiotherapy and inhalers.

Since raising my bed

1.   I no longer get muscle spasm in my legs.
2.   My walking is much improved. I do not use my stick anymore.
3.   The eye weakness is much improved. It only ‘wanders’ when I am very tired.
4.   The lump has shrunk to a small flat area; there is no pain, just a feeling of slight pressure. Physiotherapy is no longer required.
5.   My weight has increased by over half a stone
6.   The asthma is much improved-the inhaler was only needed a couple of times this summer for high pollen count level.
7.   My sinusitis is much improved and less painful. Physiotherapy is no longer needed and I only occasionally use an inhaler.

I do not have the exhaustion, I feel more energetic and less tired. My ms is more stable; one day is more like the next and not so erratic. Raising my bed has brought positive results and continues to do so. I feel stronger as the months go by.

Further letter:

I forgot to mention the following information in my letter, concerning my improvement since raising my bed.
   My balance has improved, I have had no relapses and my hair is in better condition and there is more of it!!.

My bladder control is much better, particularly at night. This is a real bonus!

Other people including nurses. Medics and friends, have remarked how much better I am.
They are amazed that my MS stayed stable when a painful operation without any anaesthetic (at my own request) to help keep my ms stable.
Everyone I amazed at the absence of my stick.

Best wishes  (name omitted)
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #27 on: 06/03/2009 09:03:23 »
Inclined Bed Therapy (IBT) works far better when the whole bed is tilted from head to toe. Pillows will help but to experience a real shot in the arm the five degree angle has produced phenomenal results with people who have both relapsing remitting ms and primary and secondary progressive ms, the latter obviously takes longer to begin to show signs of recovery.

As suggested I made contact with a lady with ms, who has been using IBT for 11 years now, she has remained virtually symptom free for all of this time and the only symptoms she has experienced over this time has been the odd bout of optic neuritis, which promptly clears 100% in days.

I also learned that for the last 2 years she has been experimenting with the angle of the bed and lowered it to 4 inches and has not had any relapses during sleeping at the lower angle which is very interesting and indicates that some curative repairs have helped to maintain her circulation. I will ask her if she come to the forum and share her experiences with all of us as I am sure we will all find what she has to say to be fascinating.  A month ago, I saw another lady with ms in a shop that had trouble walking when we first met and depended on her cane for support. She did not see my wife and I as I observed her walking without the stick up and down stairs.

I know this all sounds too simple to be of any use, heaven knows, I’ve heard it said enough over the years, yet the 2% of people who test the therapy for themselves have found vast improvements and stability over many years.

There will of course be the exceptional case, where neurological damage has been occurring over many years that may not respond fully, but everyone should to some degree gain significant relief from symptoms using IBT.

It has often been suggested that IBT is of little use because I have no medical qualifications, and indeed Sarah has asked this same question.

This research began when working on an irrigation project, trying to solve an age old problem of salt soil build up in arid areas, due to high evaporation. This salt crust on the surface of the soil led to a question as to what the trees were doing with these salts as wherever trees were present, the salt on the soil was not. That was the beginning over fifteen years ago, that led to not only solving how trees raise water to great heights by using gravity rather than struggling against it, but led to a big question about our own physiology and how we too use gravity to assist circulation rather than struggling against it as erroneously believed in the annals of medical literature.

IBT was born out of a curiosity as to what if anything would happen if we abandoned sleeping flat, a practice the whole human population does without question and without any scientifically controlled study to test it’s efficacy.

Within 4 weeks 2 people who had varicose veins, my wife being the first and a nurse called Stephanie the second case both revealed that the pressure inside the veins had reduced causing the swollen veins to become normal veins. My wife had hers for 16 years following the birth of our eldest son. So a spontaneous recovery in 2 out of 2 cases looked highly unlikely. But I needed more and more cases in order to prove one way or another that gravity was indeed a beneficial influence on the circulation of all living organisms. So my mum eventually tilted her bed along with a few more people and at the time, I was focused on varicose veins only, but then several people with varicose veins who also had oedema (tissue fluid retention in lower limbs) began to report that the oedema was dramatically vanishing as the veins become less swollen. And this to me at least was a logical observation as the oedema was caused because the pressure inside the veins and the lymphatic system was greater than the pressure inside the skin and muscle tissue so migration of fluids should follow the path of least resistance, just like a stream follows the path to the ocean.

But when my mother called after 4 weeks of IBT to inform me that not only had her veins and oedema improved but that she, unbeknown to me had suffered for 10 years of being unable to move her toes and ankle and was saying she could now move them and was doing so while on the phone, left me intrigued as to why the nervous system should be responding along with the main circulation. A week or so later she called again to say that sensitivity on the same leg had returned.

Now, I needed to understand more about human and animal physiology so embarked on a huge absorption of information from books, nursing manuals, physiology books, medical history books to find a neurological condition that might respond to IBT based only on my mothers initial reporting. MS looked a likely candidate, so I asked friends in Paignton if they knew anyone who had MS. Again logical to me at least. The local cake shop told me of a man called Roger Kirk who has possibly the worst case of MS they knew of and could certainly use some help as he was in a bad way and had been in a wheelchair for many years. When I made an appointment to see Roger after explaining exactly what I’ve just shared with you here, he instantly understood that I was not some barmy escapee from the local asylum because like myself he had an engineering background. After our initial meeting Roger agreed to sleep on a slope to see what if anything would happen. Well, glad to say it did happen and Roger and I became great friends for many years and I visited him regularly to learn of more and more subtle improvements and some set backs that appeared to be humidity related.

Roger came with me to give a lecture at the local MS Society Chapter in Kingskerswell. The lecture was at a hall in Kingsteignton and formed a small part of their usual meeting. Nevertheless a very small group of people with ms did take notice, while the vast majority of people exercised their right to remain ignorant.

The small group of open minded people with ms no longer attended the meetings and gradually over the months kept feeding me reports of often unprecedented improvements, reflecting Roger’s  reports to perfection. I was so excited for everyone that I contacted two MS charities and arranged a meeting to inform them about what was happening to these people in Devon. I paid for myself and 2 others to travel to meet the MS Society, who said a doctor and researchers would be there to hear what we had to say. On arrival no one knew we were coming and the only person there who could hear us was a telephonist who had little knowledge of human physiology.

Off to the next charity in Essex. The Multiple Sclerosis Resource Centre to meet John Simkins and his associate. This proved more fruitful and we were told that they were not surprised that the MS Society had failed us. And to not worry as they would take on board these impressive findings and would help us in any way they could, eventually agreeing to provide an independent assessment of the small group of people with ms who had taken part in the pilot ms study.

This report was titled: Raised Bed Survey http://curezone.com/upload/Members/New02/Andrew_K_Fletcher/RAISED_BED_SURVEY.rtf
   

This eventually involving me being granted access to the Torbay Hospital Medical Research database, where I spent many hours researching looking for clues about ms and finding links to other medical conditions that might respond also to IBT. This was long before I knew there was an Internet back in 1995. Here I learned more about MS and Parkinson’s Disease.

Nothing much happened with the medical profession or the charities that had promised so much. In fact, I have been let down by so many people working in the health industry and charity world that I have lost count. So many promises broken I have little respect left for the majority of people that have the plaques on the wall and the white coats, whose get out clause was: “It could have happened anyway due to the unpredictability of multiple sclerosis”. But there are a few people who remain friends and who too struggle against the people who prefer the status quo, rather than rocking the boat to advance our understanding of science. I have won the support of professors, doctors, surgeons, nurses and scientists around the world and not because I have a degree but because I have discovered and specialised in something that is worth investigating for 15 years and never given up, continuing only because it is the right thing to do!

Andrew K Fletcher
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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NEW MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS THEORY
« Reply #28 on: 06/03/2009 09:08:28 »
 

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NEW MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS THEORY
« Reply #29 on: 06/03/2009 23:43:28 »
Is there anything that IBT doesn't work for?
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #30 on: 07/03/2009 14:06:01 »
Thanks for the question.

Cancer: Having been unable to help Dad. I guess it's fair to say IBT won't help people by preventing cancer from spreading. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or ALS. Not had much success with halting this illness, although to be fair only 2 people in the advanced stage of the illness have reported back to me. Some cases of progressive multiple sclerosis are very slow to respond also. And although spinal cord injury has been shown to be reversible to some degree a full recovery from spinal cord injury after 2 years post injury is unlikely. Though a huge amount of recovery is possible and has been reported by many people with both complete and incomplete spinal cord injuries. Dikul, The Russian Trapeze artist who fell and became paralysed made a complete recovery after being told he could never walk again. He went on to become the strongest man in the World by using an exercise regimen involving repetitive exercise using a sloping bench for push ups over many hours, often falling asleep on the sloping bench. His first job following some recovery was riding a motorcycle around the inside of a giant tube, known as the wall of death. I have postulated on the possibility of a centrifugal force being used to improve the outcome of spinal cord injury further. Who knows, in a few years time when the implications for this research are fully realised we may see a centrifuge used for spinal cord injury recovery.

Immortality is not going to happen using IBT in the foreseeable future. We will still get older, but I suspect based on the many reports I have already received that the ageing process may be slowed down by at least ten years using IBT. Not enough figures to substantiate this and not enough years of research yet either. But in the fifteen years I have researched this, a large number of people have stated they feel 10 years or more younger using it. Wrinkles also appear less and the face is less puffy and distorted as it is waking from a flat bed. Muscular atrophy is reversed using IBT and bone loss arrested. The stooped posture common in the elderly is also corrected due to the slight traction on the spine each night. This is also backed up by many published papers where muscular atrophy and bone loss among other adverse reactions have been observed using both flat bed rest and head down bed rest as a model.

An eye condition called retinitis pigmentosa, or RP, a condition that affects the cones at the back of the eye did not respond to IBT, although many other benefits from the inclined bed were felt by a man who was totally blind (rare), he did not regain his sight.

Yet Several other people with multiple sclerosis who were also registered blind through supposedly irreversible optic nerve damage did recover their sight and go on to being able to function without glasses. One lady in particular is now able to drive a vehicle without glasses.

Male Baldness. Although it has to some degree slowed it down and in some cases encouraged hairs to continue to grow without falling out. Pubic hair needs to be cut as I have mentioned before.

Cystic fibrosis. No luck with two children who have this condition, sorry to say.

There may be more conditions that IBT does not help.


Is there anything that IBT doesn't work for?
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #31 on: 16/03/2009 13:06:42 »
Exciting new paper indicating circulation problem rather than disease in MS.
Professor Zamboni Titled: Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis showing swollen veins in 100% of patients with ms.


http://www.ms-info.net/evo/msmanu/839.htm
© Dr. F. Alfons Schelling, M.D.
(V-2) Cause of the Injurious Impulses
As a result of his painstaking, well-documented investigations, Fog was led to postulate two revolutionary theses -- which unfortunately went almost unnoticed:

    * The changes in the central nervous system may be the result of disturbances of circulation, especially in the venous drainage, these disturbances may be intermittent and of varying degree.
    * The hypertrophy, i.e. excessive development of fibrous connective tissue, about the major plaque veins is somehow related to the pressure changes within the chest (47,48).

In 1955 Lumsden had stated that "[from the available evidence] it does not follow that the agency [causing multiple sclerosis] is necessarily a living or even a chemical one". Instead, he suggested that vascular pressure was the condition's effective cause, since not only the way its lesions extended, but also their shapes, appeared determined by such mechanical factors as stress lines and pressure forces (69).
Later, after having realized the significance of Dawson's and Fog's (although, apparently, not of Schlesingers) observations on cerebral multiple sclerosis, Lumsden explicitly noted that its lesions were related to "the deep venous drainage of the white matter", i.e. to affluents of the straight sinus. Aware of the fact that the plaque-vein relationship actually constituted "a fundamental or even the dominant principle of the process of multiple sclerosis", Lumsden anticipated that the problems relating to its development would possibly be solved when "more is known about the relative venous pressures in these regions" (71).
Irrespective of these insights, since the 1970's no headway has been made towards a better understanding of the relationships between local venous pressures and specific plaque developments. But Lumsden's and Fog's notes may be taken to spotlight the legitimacy and urgency of the attempt at clarifying the injurious potential of venous back-jets selectively burdening, in particular, the deep system of venous drainage of the brain.
Interesting discussion
http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-6488-zamboni.html

http://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/rapidpdf/jnnp.2008.157164v1 Download Zamboni’s paper and examine the x-ray plates. Better still print it off and read it several times at your leasure, it is well worth it.
Venous insufficiency and spinal cord injury are very common. Haemorrhoids, varicose veins and oedema are evidence of venous insufficiency. What happens to the cerebrovascular network following spinal cord injury?



http://www.bentham.org/cnr/openacces...r4-4/004AG.pdf
Intracranial Venous Haemodynamics in Multiple Sclerosis
Paolo Zamboni1,*, Erica Menegatti1, Ilaria Bartolomei2, Roberto Galeotti1, Anna Maria Malagoni1, Giovanna
Tacconi1 and Fabrizio Salvi2
http://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/rapidpdf/jnnp.2008.157164v1.pdf
Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis
Paolo Zamboni 1*, Roberto Galeotti 1, Erica Menegatti 1, Anna M Malagoni 1, Giovanna Tacconi 1, Sergio Dall'ara 1, Ilaria Bartolomei 2 and Fabrizio Salvi 2

1 Vascular Diseases Center, University of Ferrara, Italy
2 Neurology, Bellaria Hospital, Bologna, Italy

Accepted 10 November 2008


*     Abstract

Background: The extracranial venous outflow routes in clinically defined multiple sclerosis (CDMS) have never been investigated.

Methods: Sixty-five patients affected by CDMS, and 235 controls composed, respectively, of healthy subjects, healthy subjects older than CDMS patients, patients affected by other neurological diseases, and older controls not affected by neurological diseases but scheduled for venography (HAV-C), blindly underwent a combined transcranial and extracranial Color-Doppler high-resolution examination (TCCS-ECD) aimed at detecting at least two of five parameters of anomalous venous outflow. According to the TCCS-ECD screening, patients and HAV-C further underwent selective venography of the azygous and jugular venous system with venous pressure measurement.

Results: CDMS and TCCS-ECD venous outflow anomalies were dramatically associated (OR 43, 95% CI 29-65, p<0.0001). Subsequently, venography demonstrated in CDMS, and not in controls, the presence of multiple severe extracranial stenosis, affecting the principal cerebrospinal venous segments; it configures a picture of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) with four different patterns of distribution of stenosis and substitute circle. Moreover, relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive courses were associated to CCSVI patterns significantly different from those of primary progressive (p<0.0001). Finally, the pressure gradient measured across the venous stenosies was slightly but significantly higher.

Conclusion: CDMS is strongly associated with CCSVI, a picture never been described so far, characterized by abnormal venous haemodynamics determined by extracranial multiple venous strictures of unknown origin. The location of venous obstructions plays a key role in determining the clinical course of the disease.

This paper is very exciting for myself and people with multiple sclerosis.

http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview/id/271074.html here is another doctor who is convinced that MS is caused or at least contributed to by fluctuations in venous pressure. Franz Alfons Schelling, MD


 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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« Reply #32 on: 12/04/2009 10:24:52 »
Good News! I'm Finally Getting Good Results.Monday, 14-Jun-1999 13:46:10Message:205.188.195.53 writes:I've been doing the inclined bed since January. I've had M.S. for over 20 years -diagnosed in 1986 as relapsing-remitting M.S. Two years ago, I had a serious attack and ended up in the hospital for 2 weeks paralyzed from the waist down-no feeling and no motion. After a couple of months of steroids and other drugs, I became able to walk first with a walker and then with a cane very short distances.I was still left with lots of fatique, weak legs, balance problems, painful pins and needles in the legs and feet, abdominal muscle spasms, incontinance, and sleepless nights. My diagnosis became secondary progressive M.S.I decided to get off all drugs(much to my neurolist's dismay).I then found Betty Iams on the computer and began her regimen of strict diet, exercise, supplements, meditation, and I've added acupuncture. It feels great to be in control. This is a lifetime regimen for me. I'd been coasting along not getting better, but not getting worse when I read about the inclined bed. I decided to try it-what could I lose? Right away, the painful abdominal muscle spasms started to subside and sleep became somewhat better. Then nothing happened. Then I started getting worse. I decided to give up the inclined bed -this after 3 months. One problem, however-I can't sleep on a flat bed anymore! Andrew wrote for me to hang in there that it was expected that I get worse before I get better. Everyday I waited. Then like Andrew said, I started getting better and better. This past month has been amazing! I even walked up and down a flight of stairs with my cane unaided. Fatigue has gone, the abdominal muscle spasms have gone, t he painful pins and needles are subsiding, leg strength is getting better so that I can walk greater distances, and balance is much better. I still have incontinance and sleep problems, but given time, I know those problems will be gone, too. One very interesting thing happened with my eyes recently. I'm very nearsighted and had my prescription for my contacts checked 3 months ago. Last week, I went back to the eye doctor's complaining that I just couldn't see. He checked my eyes again and much to his amazement, he found that they had improved greatly since my check-up 3 months ago!I wrote Andrew about this happening and he feels that sleeping on an inclined bed can help the optic nerve to regenerate and repair the damage of long term M.S.Let me encourage anyone who is trying the inclined bed to stick with it and don't think it won't work. I'm proof it can. My whole family and I are so grateful to Andrew Fletcher. Liz SteinbrueckLiz Steinbrueck


====================================
The genetic factor in MS
====================================

Those of you who know my family MS history know that my mother had her first MS episode when I was seventeen years old and was diagnosed with relapsing/remitting MS a few years later. She has spent the last 35 years in a wheelchair. Mother is now 80 years old and has resided in a nursing home for the past 12+ years. I was diagnosed at the age of 58 with primary progressive MS, and my youngest brother was diagnosed in his early 40's.

I have a daughter who by her choice has not been part of my life for a number of years. I had not heard from her in 12 years and had no idea where she was or how to contact her until a few weeks ago. She contacted me because she was being evaluated for MS and wanted to know the details about her grandmother's MS. She was shocked to learn that I now have it also.

She has now been diagnosed with relapsing/remitting MS. It was a tremendous blow to me as well as, of course, it was to her. She was very fortunate in finding a very well-informed neurologist. He is the first neurologist I have heard of who recommended the exact same approach as the program I follow and recommend.

In addition, several important things he pointed out to her I would like to share with you.

No. 1 ATTITUDE and SELF-TALK: He told her that her attitude and her self-talk formed the foundation of her wellness program. He stressed that her biggest enemy is the fear factor. He pointed out that many, many people live long, healthy, active lives with MS, and that her best chance of doing that was to not let a fear of what might happen enter into her thoughts or the words she says.

No. 2 MS IS NOT A DISEASE BUT RATHER A WAY OF LIFE: He encouraged her to never think of MS as a disease or illness, but to always look at it as a way of life.

I am making an effort to get this young neurologist to write something for my newsletter. The diet suggestions he gave my daughter are identical to those I recommend, together with stress reduction, avoiding fatigue, avoiding activities in the summer when it is hot, etc.

I frequently hear people with MS down-play the genetic factor because no one else in their family has MS. They totally miss the point. It doesn't matter nearly so much what went before in your family as it does the children of the person with MS. No one in my mother's family prior to her had ever had MS, but now there are four of us.

The approximate numbers are these: In the general population approximately 1 in 1000 in the US get MS. If a parent has it the numbers are approximately 1 in 50. If a sibling has it the numbers are approximately 1 in 25.

Had my daughter been in touch with me in the years since my diagnosis I would have recognized her early signs years ago. Actually she has had it longer than I have. It has taken 10 years for her exacerbations to become severe enough for a diagnosis. My son is much aware of the familial predisposition in our family, and takes the exact same nutritional supplements I do. It seems to me that if such a program helps me stay ahead of MS, it should help to minimize his chances of developing it.

What does all this mean for you. If you are a parent and you have MS, your children of any age are at a higher than average risk to develop it also. You don't tell this to young children of course, but when they are at an age to handle it, they should be made aware of their risk. It is also important that they not live in fear of developing MS, or any other physical challenge which has a genetic factor. We all came into this life with genetic predispositions. Most of the time we do not develop whatever that predisposition might lead to. That is the important message to tell sons, daughters and siblings of the person who has multiple sclerosis.

To date we do not know what the genetic factor is that predisposes one to MS. It is generally called a familial predisposition, much like those of heart disease, some cancers (like breast cancer in women), arthritis and Alzheimer's.

It is my hope that in my and my daughter's lifetime the genetic factor will be discovered so that we may have a chance of defeating it in coming generations. At the present time it is not only proliferating and becoming more prevalent, but more and more men are getting MS. 25 years ago 2 out of every 3 people with MS were women. Today it is just about 50% each men and women.



====================================
MS study by Andrew Fletcher
====================================

If you are not participating in the Andrew Fletcher study, why not? It is free, involves no drugs, diet or nutritional supplements, does not cost anything, and you have absolutely nothing to lose. We are far enough into the study now to be seeing many positive results. If you are not participating, here is how you get started.

Send an e-mail to: Andrew Fletcher mailto:Old Email Address removed and ask for specifics of the program. Andrew will e-mail them to you. Then you simply raise the head of your bed six inches higher than the foot, and send simple e-mail reports to Andrew from time to time reporting what changes you experience. Some have minor discomforts the first few days, but most do not report any discomfort at all. An immediate positive result is not having to get up several times each night. Most sleep all through the night, or just get up one time.

There is also a message board where you may read the results and comments of others. All of us need to use the message board to report our results from time to time so others can benefit from our experience. You may post anonymously if you prefer.

Here is the URL of the INCLINED TO SLEEP INCLINED message board:

http://www.insidetheweb.com/mbs.cgi/mb405491

I had my daughter immediately raise the head of her bed when she learned she has MS last week, and she had an immediate reduction in the severity of the numbness and tingling in her legs and feet. She reported that to her neurologist and he said there is much scientific evidence to indicate that the human body is designed to function vertically and not horizontally. He said he is recommending inclined sleep for all his patients.

I know that hundreds of subscribers to this newsletter are not participating in this study. I must repeat, if you are not sleeping inclined, why not? If you are participating and not sending in regular reports to Andrew, please do so. We can only get the attention of the allopathic medical world by having well-documented data. Please send Andrew your reports at the suggested intervals, even if you just write him two or three sentences. Every little bit helps.

« Last Edit: 12/04/2009 10:29:48 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

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« Reply #33 on: 02/05/2009 13:14:09 »


HEALTH
Tilt your bed for a really healing sleep... Daily Mail, Tuesday, November 4,1997

Vital steps: Roger Kirk can now stand up to MS

SIMPLY raising the head of your bed by Gin, so that you sleep at an angle, could improve your health dramatically, according to an inventor who has spent four years researching and proving his theory.
It is based on the idea that by sleeping in a completely flat position, we are Ignoring the very force that powers our vital functions — gravity.
Andrew Fletcher, an engineer from Paignton in Devon, worked out that by lying flat, the circulation and the metabolic rate is slowed right down. By raising the head of the bed, and continuing gravity's natural pull, fluids are drained down through the body.
He says: 'Putting the body at an angle of at least five degrees simply allows it to work as it was designed to.'
The inventor, his wife and two children have been sleeping on angled beds for two and half years. During this time, Andrew discovered that while the heart and circulation rate drops, the metabolic rate increases, producing additional warmth, particularly in the feet and hands.
Over the last three years, he has conducted trials involving around 400 volunteers, with ailments ranging from spinal cord injuries to varicose veins. The results are said to have been 'astounding' with almost all volunteers having achieved improvement in their symptoms.
One 12-year-old girl with cerebral palsy, who had been in a wheelchair all her life, is now, after 18 months of 'angled bed therapy', taking her pet terrier for walks. Great Ormond Street Hospital, in London, has asked her parents for details of the trials.
However, Andrew Fletcher says: 'I am confident that angled sleep will alleviate all kinds of health problems.' •

The high point came on October 12 this year, when I took two steps — without even thinking.'
The Multiple Sclerosis Resource Centre has published a report based on the angled bed survey, which says: 'There is good reason for further investigation.'
But Dr Derek Gay, who has been researching the effects of MS on the brain for the last ten years, says: "The biochemistry and physiology of the human body is extremely sophisticated and isn't likely to be influenced by crude factors such as gravity.'

Roger Kirk, a former design engineer, has had MS for 33 years and has been wheelchair-bound for eight. Roger, 51, who lives in Stoke Gabriel, Devon, was approached by Andrew Fletcher in October 1995.
'My first night sleeping at an angle was uncomfortable and I woke with a headache,' he says. 'But within a week, I was feeling quite different. The muscle and joint pains which normally plague me were greatly lessened and I felt more relaxed.
« Last Edit: 06/09/2015 11:07:16 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

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« Reply #34 on: 03/05/2009 19:32:54 »







« Last Edit: 06/09/2015 10:58:56 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

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« Reply #35 on: 03/05/2009 19:33:22 »






« Last Edit: 06/09/2015 11:02:51 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

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« Reply #36 on: 03/05/2009 19:35:01 »

 

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« Last Edit: 03/05/2009 19:50:33 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

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« Reply #42 on: 03/05/2009 19:58:17 »
 

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« Reply #43 on: 03/05/2009 19:58:59 »
 

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« Reply #49 on: 03/05/2009 20:04:11 »

 

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