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Author Topic: Is space captured by matter?  (Read 1598 times)

Offline LA 46

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Is space captured by matter?
« on: 26/04/2011 06:00:26 »
I've been watching lots of science shows (fact & fiction) and it got me "thinking" about the nature of "empty space". Its been decades since I cracked a physics book and it was never my strongest subject, so this may not make any sense. I roughly understand the concept of the Rutherford/Bohr atom and how its mostly empty space. Now here is the weird question: When a hydrogen atom moves through space is space between the proton and electron dragged along with it or is it left behind for "new space" to occupy the distance between the proton and electron? In other words does space flow through matter like water through a sieve or does the proton/electron system "capture" a volume of space and carry it along while "pushing" other space out of it's way? An analogy for the later scenario would be a swimming pool full of water that represents space. I fill a balloon with that same water. The balloon's surface is the electron shell of the hydrogen atom and the water inside is the captured space. Now I move the submerged balloon through the water and it carry's the captured space with it while pushing other space out of it's way. Am I making any sense? Scaling up to macroscopic objects like a person, planet, star or black hole what is happening to space as they move through it? I'm not talking about the gravitational curvature of space and I don't think my question is about magnetic permeability.


 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Is space captured by matter?
« Reply #1 on: 26/04/2011 08:58:27 »
This is a very interesting question and the answer is no, mostly.  There is an extremely small disturbance in space itself as the atom moves through it.  We are all aware of it.  It is called gravity.  The motion of the particle also creates its own effect.  Normal gravity is basically static there is also an absolutely minuscule effect called Gravitomagnetism or "frame dragging" in which the particle does drag space with it.
 

Offline Phractality

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Is space captured by matter?
« Reply #2 on: 26/04/2011 18:51:11 »
Now here is the weird question: When a hydrogen atom moves through space is space between the proton and electron dragged along with it or is it left behind for "new space" to occupy the distance between the proton and electron?

The mainstreams science answer is that space has no substance, so it cannot be dragged. If that answer leaves you with an empty feeling, as it does me, try asking again in the New Theories section. I think you will find several more satisfying answers, there. 
 

Offline yor_on

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Is space captured by matter?
« Reply #3 on: 27/04/2011 02:25:23 »
Ouch, you know, a question as imaginative as yours will probably, sooner or later, need to be debated in 'New Theories'. We all have our own ideas, and I'm sure you have some too :) What you seem to be asking is not only what 'space' is, but also what defines invariant mass on the 'particle' level. And that one confounds me too. I don't know how to see a particle really, if we take a 'electron' it seems able to become 'super positioned' in this case being at two 'places' simultaneously under certain circumstances. And that makes me head ache :) and Helium is weird too. But assuming that a atom takes 'place', and that we do expect of it, space should be 'pushed' away in some way? But I'm not really sure of it. If you think of light as a wave, does that 'push' space away? Space seems to be most of what a 'atom' is too, 99.999~% space.

0uch :)
 

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Is space captured by matter?
« Reply #3 on: 27/04/2011 02:25:23 »

 

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