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Author Topic: What is the shape of an electron?  (Read 3300 times)

system

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What is the shape of an electron?
« on: 31/05/2011 20:30:03 »
What is round and measures 1 billionth of a millimetre across?  Yes, you guessed it, itís the electron.  Theories have predicted that these particles should be spheres, but proving this has been tricky.  Now after 10 years of trying, a team at Imperial College London have succeeded...
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« Last Edit: 31/05/2011 20:30:03 by _system »


 

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Offline Phractality

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What is the shape of an electron?
« Reply #1 on: 31/05/2011 21:02:34 »
Shrunk
Can't you see there's already a thread about this. Go away!
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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What is the shape of an electron?
« Reply #2 on: 31/05/2011 23:18:41 »
Thanks Chris! It is exactly what i needed to know... An elementary particle is defined by G*Mp^2/C=MRC=h/2π, where Mp is the Planck mass, M and R are the particle's mass and radius.

I doubt they could find a difference for antiparticles, it would mean another force associated to antimatter. Annihilation is caused by perfect geometrical symmetry and charge antisymmetry...

I think the key to matter vs antimatter asymmetry is hidden in neutron vs antineutron. I think that shortly after the BigBang, there was a soup of quarks. As the Universe expanded, these quarks stayed bound in trios and formed more neutrons than antineutrons. Then, those neutrons produced protons, electrons and electron antineutrinos, the antineutrons produced antiprotons, positrons and electron neutrinos. The antiprotons and positrons were then all annihilated by their matter counterpart. Neutrons and antineutrons should be study more carefully.

I doubt that there is any difference between neutrinos and antineutrinos as they both have a total of zero charge and are elementary. They are Dark Matter particles...
« Last Edit: 31/05/2011 23:34:03 by CPT ArkAngel »
 

Offline Supercryptid

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What is the shape of an electron?
« Reply #3 on: 01/06/2011 00:05:23 »
I know this may be getting slightly off topic, but it does relate to the matter/antimatter problem. I had done some thinking about this earlier. What if there is no particular asymmetry associated between them? What if it's just chance that we are in a matter-dominated sector of the Universe?

Imagine that you have an enormous quantity of marbles, equal amounts of red and blue. They are all in a giant container of some sort, and both types are completely randomly distributed. In most of the container, would could expect there to be a fairly uniform mixture of red and blue marbles. However, wouldn't it be logical that in some areas of the container, due to probability, there would be pockets where blue marbles would be the dominant type, and in other areas red marbles would dominate?

Likewise, might it be that we are, by chance, in a matter-dominated region of the Universe?
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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What is the shape of an electron?
« Reply #4 on: 01/06/2011 00:31:02 »
Yes, if the Bigbang have not created the entire universe, but it was instead only an event in an already existing universe, a bigbang from super giant blackholes. Does a blackhole keep tracking of matter-antimatter?
 

Offline yor_on

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What is the shape of an electron?
« Reply #5 on: 17/06/2011 18:30:46 »
Well Super, most of our conservation laws, like 'conservation of momentum' rest on symmetries. The isotropy we see is another reason why we expect it. Assume that there are no symmetries, then the equivalence principle is no proof any more, neither will any conservation laws be. As well as Newtons 'action and reaction'. Without them we once more are back to the 'magical society', as I see it.

So I do trust in 'symmetries' :)
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But yes, from a entropic point of view there is nothing stopping a system from having areas that locally are not homogeneous/isotropic, as long as the 'system' as a whole is probabilistically 'entropic' as I understands it. Take a look here but read it carefully, it may seem simple but you need to notice the caveats made. What I really like with this explanation is that it discuss it from open ended systems as our planet, or the universe at large. That we have a bubble in one way doesn't state that we can't have a 'infinity' too. Entropy Is Simple ó If We Avoid The Briar Patches!
« Last Edit: 17/06/2011 18:45:29 by yor_on »
 

Offline CPT ArkAngel

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What is the shape of an electron?
« Reply #6 on: 17/06/2011 23:06:29 »
I agree with you, but we might be wrong... It would mean that, with time, which is not a problem for the entire universe, bubbles of matter and bubbles of antimatter were formed and were separated by part of space where there was a quasi total annhihilation.

This information is in the spins...
 

Offline lightarrow

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What is the shape of an electron?
« Reply #7 on: 18/06/2011 13:19:24 »
What is round and measures 1 billionth of a millimetre across?  Yes, you guessed it, itís the electron.  Theories have predicted that these particles should be spheres, but proving this has been tricky.  Now after 10 years of trying, a team at Imperial College London have succeeded...
They have measured the electric dipole moment of the electron and found a little value. They can't claim this proves the electron to be a sphere.

For example: the hydrogen molecule has zero electric dipole moment, but it's not round:
http://lukio.pyhajoki.fi/Oppiaineet/Fysiikka/cern2006/exercises/keyhole/en/theory/main-5.html
« Last Edit: 19/06/2011 12:48:40 by lightarrow »
 

Offline Mr. Data

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What is the shape of an electron?
« Reply #8 on: 27/06/2011 19:58:00 »
I'm going to be a bit dense in asking this for sure, but I read the article, and I am not sure whether they say the particle certainly is dimensionless, pointlike. Have they said it certainly has dimensions?
 

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What is the shape of an electron?
« Reply #8 on: 27/06/2011 19:58:00 »

 

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