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Author Topic: Do photons experience time?  (Read 8397 times)

Offline yor_on

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Do photons experience time?
« Reply #25 on: 02/07/2011 18:23:03 »
I'm not discussing a photons 'frame of reference' at all? You just don't seem to read what I write here? I define light as a constant, then I define what a frame of reference is, all to explain why I'm defining 'locality' as the proper perspective for understanding relativity. As for your question? There is no 'frame of reference' from a photons perspective. If you mean the 'clock' I'm discussing, then that can be defined as lights invariant speed in a vacuum.
==

'Frames of reference' build on lights speed in a vacuum too. That's why they exist, and it has taken me some pondering to understand them properly. You can see them as something that exist up to 'c'. At 'c' we have no proper definitions for them, as that is a limit of our understanding. It's a 'singularity' of sorts, in that we can't define what happens pass that limit, other as a theoretical guess. FTL and taychons may be called theories, but as they have no experimental evidence I know of, I would call them hypothesis's myself.

« Last Edit: 02/07/2011 18:36:34 by yor_on »
 

Offline Mr. Data

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Do photons experience time?
« Reply #26 on: 02/07/2011 18:48:16 »
I'm not discussing a photons 'frame of reference' at all? You just don't seem to read what I write here? I define light as a constant, then I define what a frame of reference is, all to explain why I'm defining 'locality' as the proper perspective for understanding relativity. As for your question? There is no 'frame of reference' from a photons perspective. If you mean the 'clock' I'm discussing, then that can be defined as lights invariant speed in a vacuum.
==

'Frames of reference' build on lights speed in a vacuum too. That's why they exist, and it has taken me some pondering to understand them properly. You can see them as something that exist up to 'c'. At 'c' we have no proper definitions for them, as that is a limit of our understanding. It's a 'singularity' of sorts, in that we can't define what happens pass that limit, other as a theoretical guess. FTL and taychons may be called theories, but as they have no experimental evidence I know of, I would call them hypothesis's myself.


You led me to the path we discuss. If you are making a mockery of this, forget my participation from now on.
 

Offline Mr. Data

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Do photons experience time?
« Reply #27 on: 02/07/2011 18:49:09 »
...and by the way, tachyons are completely irrevelent to our topic as they cannot exist in nature due to tachyon condensation.
 

Offline yor_on

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Do photons experience time?
« Reply #28 on: 02/07/2011 18:58:17 »
I think you're right Mr Data, we've gotten astray from the subject. When we define a speed to photons we do it relative 'time' and 'distance'. So we observe them as defined from that perspective, but from a photons perspective the idea of 'time' and 'distance' becomes a meaningless definition. And that's another way to define why a photons 'frame of reference' becomes impossible to define. If I define it as a clock, with each beat locally being a photon annihilating at your retina, then trying to look at it from the perspective of being one single photon stops the 'clock'. And having no arrow to define a causality in, there is nothing to measure.
 

Offline Mr. Data

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Do photons experience time?
« Reply #29 on: 02/07/2011 19:14:47 »
Hence why we have a subject focused on human observation. Just because we are stuck in illusionary mesh of time, does not mean all objects in the universe are.
 

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Do photons experience time?
« Reply #29 on: 02/07/2011 19:14:47 »

 

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