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Author Topic: How effective are scarecrows?  (Read 8304 times)

Offline CliffordK

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How effective are scarecrows?
« on: 09/06/2011 04:07:45 »
How effective are scarecrows?
Do they do anything more than provide a convenient roost for the birds?

By running an electric wire 12 to 18" of the ground the length of my rows, I can keep the deer and turkeys out.  As stuff starts to grow up, I'll move the wire aside.

However, I seem to be getting a plague of crows now.  And they seem to think I'm putting the seeds out for them!!!

I'm seeing notes on the internet to tie CD's and can lids to a string and making them flutter in the wind. 

Another option for next year would be to put out some more posts and try to set my electric wire about 3" from the ground.

I suppose the last option would be to get a shotgun and shoot some skyrats.  Can one eat crows?
Hmmm, I see recipes for Crow Breast Filets.
http://www.crowbusters.com/recipes.htm


 

Offline Geezer

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #1 on: 09/06/2011 05:07:14 »
Crows are really smart, so I don't think it takes them long to figure a scarecrow out. However, I seem to remember farms in the UK with scarecrows that appeared to have a shotgun, and the shotgun was rigged to fire blanks of some sort from time to time. Might not be too popular with the neighbors though.

We have a plague of white tail deer. The only way to keep them out of your garden is with a seven foot high fence!

 

Offline RD

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #2 on: 09/06/2011 06:29:05 »
Another option for next year would be to put out some more posts and try to set my electric wire about 3" from the ground.

Careful now ...

Quote
Pet killed by 'electric fence'
An 11-year-old girl found her pet cat dead after a neighbour installed electrified wires to protect his flowers.

Laura Bulmer discovered the 10-month-old black cat, called Toby, with smoke still coming from its mouth after it strayed into the garden of pensioner James Pringle Smith.

The 68-year-old had installed electric wires in the garden of his Penrith, Cumbria, home to deter pets trampling on his flower beds.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/cumbria/3049297.stm

Don't mess with the crazy cat-people ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxoplasma_gondii

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toxoplasmosis#Possible_link_to_psychiatric_disorders
« Last Edit: 09/06/2011 06:36:50 by RD »
 

Offline CliffordK

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #3 on: 09/06/2011 07:52:15 »
Odd

I would think it would be pretty hard to kill an cat with 12V.  Even if one chose to use a full 1000A from a car battery.  The problem is that the hair and skin is quite a good insulator.  It really would have to touch the fence with a mucous membrane, and perhaps having to hit both conductors with a mucous membrane (like a mouth).

I would question on whether the guy had it connected to a battery charger, or had given up on the battery charger and connected it directly to household current.

When I was a kid, we had an electric fence charger that was on 100% of the time.  However, those are illegal now.  All electric chargers available now are intermittent. 

The problem with the continuous chargers (and household current or the battery charger) is that muscles tend to freeze. or contract with electrical current.  So, in the case of the cat, if it bit the wires, it could literally get locked to the wires until it died with no chance of release or escape.

Anyway, the intermittent charger that we had when I was a kid was strong enough that it would make your arm numb.  The charger that I have now just gives a little tingle (and, yes, I did test it). 

I've got about 3 deer living on, or around my property.

They don't bother my garden stuff.  And, I think the low electric fence even keeps the turkeys out.

One of the tricks is don't just put up a perimeter fence, but rather run the electric fence down the rows, and crossing through the middle of the garden.  They literally can't go anywhere in the garden without getting zapped.

Anyway, the only risk to a cat with a super low "standard" electrical fence would be if it had a non-break-away collar that got stuck on the wire.

That is a good idea though.

If I actually wanted to hunt crows.

I could essentially make a super-bug-zapper!!!

 

Offline RD

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #4 on: 10/06/2011 01:31:20 »
Re: scarecrow

IMO something which randomly moves suddenly when everthing else is still would be the best bet.
It wouldn't have to necessarily have to resemble something natural like Robo-owl

Crows are pretty smart though ...
« Last Edit: 10/06/2011 01:39:05 by RD »
 

Offline CliffordK

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #5 on: 11/06/2011 04:43:16 »
Not much use for gardening...
But, I found an interesting pigeon and urban bird deterrent.

http://www.avishock.net/general-avishock-images.asp

 

Offline Don_1

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #6 on: 14/06/2011 10:33:46 »
These are quite common on UK farms.
 

Offline RD

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #7 on: 14/06/2011 11:19:33 »
These are quite common on UK farms.

I think you may have just explained what I thought was distant repeated explosion/gun noises in the early hours
[no I don't live in Libya, I live in "the sticks"]
« Last Edit: 15/06/2011 10:34:41 by RD »
 

Offline Geezer

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #8 on: 14/06/2011 18:02:20 »
These are quite common on UK farms.

Ah! My memory was not playing tricks on me after all.

(Thinks: Hmmmm??? - shouldn't be too hard to make one of them. Fourth of July is coming up fast. I'm sure my neighbors would appreciate it. 3:30 am would probably be about right.)
 

Offline RD

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #9 on: 15/06/2011 10:19:29 »
Thinks: Hmmmm??? - shouldn't be too hard to make one of them.

The BBC made a really big one ...


http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=25277.msg272959#msg272959

TV license fee wisely spent  :)
« Last Edit: 15/06/2011 10:31:05 by RD »
 

Offline Don_1

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #10 on: 15/06/2011 11:08:10 »
I think you might have a bit of a problem with something that powerful. The idea is to scare the crows. That thing might render itself redundant by blowing the crops halfway into next month.
 

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How effective are scarecrows?
« Reply #10 on: 15/06/2011 11:08:10 »

 

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