The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: How can we measure the historical climate of the universe?  (Read 1325 times)

system

  • Guest
Climatologists and geologists have developed a number of ways to estimate the temperature on Earth going back a very long way in Earth’s history – but astronomers would like to know the historic temperature of the entire universe – going back more than 13 billion years. George Becker, a fellow at the Kavli Institute for Cosmology, uses the light from Quasars to read off the climatological history of the universe...

Read a transcript of the interview by clicking here
or Listen to it now or [download as MP3]
« Last Edit: 26/07/2011 23:01:02 by _system »


 

Offline Mr. Data

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 275
    • View Profile
How can we measure the historical climate of the universe?
« Reply #1 on: 28/07/2011 18:04:48 »
Cosmic bruises also tell us the story of the universes climate. It is possible with this evidence, to assume the universe was frozen as a prestate to the big bang.
 

Offline MarcS

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
How can we measure the historical climate of the universe?
« Reply #2 on: 29/07/2011 19:43:07 »
If the gas in the intergalactic medium is highly ionized why does it have an absorption spectrum?  If the absorption comes from a photon of a specific wavelength being absorbed by an atom by kicking an electron up to a higher state then wouldn't an ionized hydrogen or helium atom not be able to absorb a photon since they have no electrons?
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

How can we measure the historical climate of the universe?
« Reply #2 on: 29/07/2011 19:43:07 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
 
Login
Login with username, password and session length