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Author Topic: The Super Nova Stars.. Questions.  (Read 4980 times)

Offline RRR

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The Super Nova Stars.. Questions.
« on: 23/04/2006 13:41:09 »
What is a distance of  explosion's wave of  Super Nova stars ?

What are potential  consequences for the Solar system if
the giant blue  star  Spica (a star of  the Virgo's constellation close to the Solar system)  will become a Super Nova Star in future?

The Spica has a  lightness in  740 times more big than the Sun's  lightness. The Spica is blue giant superstar.
A distance between Spica and  the Solar System: 220 light years.
==============================
Answer, please.









 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: The Super Nova Stars.. Questions.
« Reply #1 on: 23/04/2006 15:05:57 »
Spica is 260 million light years away, and is far enough away from us to disperse most of its gamma rays, x-rays and cosmic rays . It would be amazing to watch from eath though. The safe distance would depend on the type and size of the star but i believe its around the 150 to 200 light year mark.


The next one which could go supernova and could go at anytime is the red super giant Betelgeuse which is 600 light years away and is the tenth brightest star in the sky. it is so big at present that it could possibly extend out as far as Jupiter.
Michael
« Last Edit: 24/04/2006 23:34:34 by ukmicky »
 

Offline RRR

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Re: The Super Nova Stars.. Questions.
« Reply #2 on: 24/04/2006 08:16:09 »
Thanks for your answer, Michael.
It was interesting for me to read your opinion.
I did read your opinion and I have some questions to you, Michael.
=========================
Michael wrote: Spica is 260 million light years away.

For example, the Guinness world book of records wrote:
The farest object you can see without a telescope:
"The Andromeda's Nebula (a giant spiral galaxy).
A distance is 2.3 million light years away."

The star Spica can not be more far than the Andromeda's Nebula.
It is your error.
The brightest stars of Earth's sky the stars are situated not far to the Solar system in area between 4 and 900 light years to the Solar system.
Spica is one of the stars.
About a distance to Spica I did see a figure of 220 light years.  You wrote a figure "260 milions years away". What is an information's  source with the figure which you wrote?.
=======================================================
Michael wrote:
 the red super giant Betelgeuse which is 600 years away .


About a distance to Betelgeuse I did see different figures.
The World Guinness book of records wrote that the distance is 300 light years.
=============================
Michael wrote:
"Betelgeuse which is 600 years away.. it is so big at present.."
.

The Earth's view of any star which is  600 light years away, it is a view which the star did have 600 years ago.
Modern situation into the star a science can not to know because  
it is impossible to receive any information  more rapidly than the light's speed.
==================================================================

Michael wrote:
"The next one which could go supernova and could go at anytime is the red super giant Betelgeuse.."
.

Why do you think so?
What is chemical composition of Betelheuse with percentages?

Red giant stars are life's final of the Sun's type of stars.
There are forecasts that In 4.5 billion year the Sun will become a red giant star like Betelheuse.
Red star can not detonate itself. The red giant star will become more and more cold and with a time the star transform itself into white dwarf star like the Sirius B (a satellite of the Sirius star).  

Yes the Betelgeuse is very big.
The red giant stars are very big, but red stars are not hot.
For example, The Sun has much more hot temperature than Betelgeuse.
=================
Michael wrote:
"The next one which could go supernova and could go at anytime is the red super giant Betelgeuse.."
.

I did read that the stars  could go supernova if the stars more massive than a mass of 2 Suns,and if the stars are more hot than the Sun or any other yellow star.
With the conditions the types of stars which could go supernova stars its are between white and blue stars.

You wrote: "The safe distance would depend on the type and size of the star"
 
What you can say about potential results of the star Sirius's explosion?
Sirius have a mass more than a mass of 2 Suns.
A Mass of Sirius: 4.26 exatons. (1 exaton= 10e27 tons)
A diameter of Sirius: 2.33 millions km. (1mile= 1.6km)  
Star class of Sirius is: A1.  (A1 is a type of white stars)
A distance between Sirius and the Solar system it is 8.6 light years.
A lightness of Sirius is like a lightness of 26 Suns.
=============================
Answer, please, the message's questions..
« Last Edit: 24/04/2006 08:37:58 by RRR »
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: The Super Nova Stars.. Questions.
« Reply #3 on: 24/04/2006 23:22:56 »
quote:
Originally posted by RRR

Thanks for your answer, Michael.
It was interesting for me to read your opinion.
I did read your opinion and I have some questions to you, Michael.
=========================
Michael wrote: Spica is 260 million light years away.

For example, the Guinness world book of records wrote:
The farest object you can see without a telescope:
"The Andromeda's Nebula (a giant spiral galaxy).
A distance is 2.3 million light years away."

The star Spica can not be more far than the Andromeda's Nebula.
It is your error.
The brightest stars of Earth's sky the stars are situated not far to the Solar system in area between 4 and 900 light years to the Solar system.
Spica is one of the stars.
About a distance to Spica I did see a figure of 220 light years.  You wrote a figure "260 milions years away". What is an information's  source with the figure which you wrote?.
sorry my error I meant to say 260 light years.
=======================================================
quote:
Michael wrote:
 the red super giant Betelgeuse which is 600 years away .


About a distance to Betelgeuse I did see different figures.
The World Guinness book of records wrote that the distance is 300 light years.

There are many different figures from many different sources but  its not as near as the 300 LY that the Guinness book of records states   .The observers handbook says  it at   522 light-years

Itís between 500 to 600  LY
http://web.austin.utexas.edu/edcannon/betelgeuse.html

=============================
quote:
Michael wrote:
"Betelgeuse which is 600 years away.. it is so big at present.."
.

The Earth's view of any star which is  600 light years away, it is a view which the star did have 600 years ago.
Modern situation into the star a science can not to know because  
It is impossible to receive any information  more rapidly than the light's speed.


ok Present view of the star .  I would have assumed you would have realized that is what was meant.

Some people even say that it may have already gone supernova because as you say our view is an old view
==================================================================

quote:
Michael wrote:
"The next one which could go supernova and could go at anytime is the red super giant Betelgeuse.."
.

Why do you think so?
What is chemical composition of Betelgeuse with percentages?

Red giant stars are life's final of the Sun's type of stars.
There are forecasts that In 4.5 billion year the Sun will become a red giant star like Betelheuse.
No our sun is a low mass star and will become a red giant and not a super red giant like Betelgeuse.
quote:

You wrote: "The safe distance would depend on the type and size of the star"

What you can say about potential results of the star Sirius's explosion?
Sirius have a mass more than a mass of 2 Suns.
A Mass of Sirius: 4.26 exatons. (1 exaton= 10e27 tons)
A diameter of Sirius: 2.33 millions km. (1mile= 1.6km)
Star class of Sirius is: A1. (A1 is a type of white stars)
A distance between Sirius and the Solar system it is 8.6 light years.
A lightness of Sirius is like a lightness of 26 Suns.
=============================
Answer, please, the message's questions..


Sirius will never go supernova as its a low mass star.

However, but im not totally sure about this but when Sirius  reaches its red giant phase and if it were to dump enough matter onto Sirius B about 1.4 times the mass of our Sun (Chandrasekhar limit) it could go supernova and collapse upon itself to become a neutron star or black hole i believe its called a type Ia super nova. But again Iím not sure. But  If this were to happen then yes we would have to worry here on earth.



Michael
« Last Edit: 25/04/2006 01:09:27 by ukmicky »
 

Offline time-cop

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Re: The Super Nova Stars.. Questions.
« Reply #4 on: 25/04/2006 01:23:41 »
i have always wondered how we measure the distance to stars,and it bothers me as to how accurate the distance is,if,like you say,a close one went super-nova,we would just have to sit here and watch our demise approach.
or have i got it wrong,and we are totally safe,and if the worst happens,Bruce Willis will save us.  


http://www.armybarmy.org
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: The Super Nova Stars.. Questions.
« Reply #5 on: 25/04/2006 03:24:13 »
quote:
Originally posted by time-cop

i have always wondered how we measure the distance to stars,and it bothers me as to how accurate the distance is,if,like you say,a close one went super-nova,we would just have to sit here and watch our demise approach.
or have i got it wrong,and we are totally safe,and if the worst happens,Bruce Willis will save us.  


http://www.armybarmy.org

Hi ray it took me a while to work out who you were.:)
If you go to most web sites you will get lots of conflicting information regarding the distances for lots of stars  Betelgeuse for example, the only thing they all seem to agree on is the distance to Andromeda.
Their are also  people questioning how we calculate and determine stellar distances
and why they maybe wrong http://zebu.uoregon.edu/~js/ast123/lectures/lec13.html

As for a nearby star going supernova, i don't think there are any nearby stars  massive enough to go supernova in the near future so apart from maybe a white dwarf gaining mass from a binary partner and going off in a type Ia supernova its not gonna happen and even if it will its a long time away.
http://www.solstation.com/stars3/100-as.htm
Their are more knowledgeable members than me maybe they can help with this one and let me know if Ive gone wrong anywhere.
Michael
« Last Edit: 25/04/2006 03:34:16 by ukmicky »
 

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Re: The Super Nova Stars.. Questions.
« Reply #5 on: 25/04/2006 03:24:13 »

 

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