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Author Topic: Is driftwood OK to burn in domestic fireplaces?  (Read 13983 times)

Offline annie123

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Is driftwood OK to burn in domestic fireplaces?
« on: 07/09/2011 00:20:11 »
Driftwood turning up on the seashore is plentiful, but I have been told it isn't good for fireplaces because of the salt content. Is this true?
« Last Edit: 02/12/2013 23:44:39 by chris »


 

Offline CliffordK

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?Is driftwood OK to burn in domestic fireplaces?
« Reply #1 on: 07/09/2011 03:01:44 »
I was looking for information on the web.  There are apparently two problems with burning driftwood. 

1) Burning driftwood releases polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) which are carcinogenic due to the chlorine content in the salt.  Most of it would go up the chimney, but it is still bad for the environment.

2) The salt may react with metal wood stoves, fireplace inserts and liners, and metal flues.  It would be less of a problem for a 100% masonry fireplace, but there are often a few steel components associated with even masonry fireplaces.

Here is a long discussion.  It quickly turned from positive to negative.

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/firepl/msg0912544110124.html
 

Offline CZARCAR

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?Is driftwood OK to burn in domestic fireplaces?
« Reply #2 on: 07/09/2011 19:34:01 »
I was looking for information on the web.  There are apparently two problems with burning driftwood. 

1) Burning driftwood releases polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) which are carcinogenic due to the chlorine content in the salt.  Most of it would go up the chimney, but it is still bad for the environment.

2) The salt may react with metal wood stoves, fireplace inserts and liners, and metal flues.  It would be less of a problem for a 100% masonry fireplace, but there are often a few steel components associated with even masonry fireplaces.

Here is a long discussion.  It quickly turned from positive to negative.

http://ths.gardenweb.com/forums/load/firepl/msg0912544110124.html
need some analyzations= stove gonna max @ ~ 1400f & the NaCL is gonna interact with h2o & creosotes & the wood fiber so what can happen? Personally, I've read a lot from poster "berlin" & his only concern was "it might etch the glass & fog it". Old timers ,ive heard, used to throw salt in the fire to interact with chimney creosote. Q= if the salt did tend to rust the stove, would it be noticeable upon inspection?
 

Offline peterhiller

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Re: ?Is driftwood OK to burn in domestic fireplaces?
« Reply #3 on: 02/12/2013 15:47:14 »
I know a lot of people who do. There's just a question of what kind of wood it was originally. Something with a lot of sap might well put some creosote in the chimney, but unless you're burning it all the time I wouldn't worry too much about it.

It's the salt in the wood that helps create the neat colors.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: ?Is driftwood OK to burn in domestic fireplaces?
« Reply #4 on: 02/12/2013 21:43:15 »
I suspect the yield of chlorinated materials is somewhere between small and non existent.
If the big advantage to driftwood is that it's plentiful then get lots of it and leave it out in the rain to remove most of the salt, then dry it to burn.
 

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Re: ?Is driftwood OK to burn in domestic fireplaces?
« Reply #4 on: 02/12/2013 21:43:15 »

 

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