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Author Topic: Business Laws and Your Billing?  (Read 1361 times)

Offline Titanscape

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Business Laws and Your Billing?
« on: 13/10/2011 12:03:36 »
Hi, I was a Testra mobile user a few years back. My contract term ended after two years. I phoned them about what I thought was an over billing for my pre-paid. The woman from the Philippines did not want to talk about it, but asked "Do you want to make a new one year contract?!" I said no and asked about the over-biling again, but before I could finish, the same question. And again for about five minutes, until I said ok. I phoned back to cancel this. The new woman simply asked if I agreed at all, and told me then there was a contract. But this is not legal in Australia. My mum complained to them and the recording of the session was reviewed and the contract cancelled.

Mum is the word.

What are contract laws like in the US and Canada and the UK...?
« Last Edit: 13/10/2011 12:06:20 by Titanscape »


 

Offline imatfaal

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Business Laws and Your Billing?
« Reply #1 on: 14/10/2011 10:40:47 »
Not simple enough to explain easily on a forum.   ;D

However within the EU - any consumer sales over the phone (or at distance) will have a mandatory 14 day cooling off period in which the consumer can cancel without penalty.  I would be surprised if a jurisdiction like Oz didnt have a similar distance selling regulation.

BTW the truism "a verbal contract isn't worth the paper it is written on" is almost completely false.  The only contracts that in the UK (and I would hazard a guess in Oz as well) that need to be in writing are those transfering or modifying an interest in land.

In a business-to-business environment a verbal acknowledgement to be bound to a contract is quite sufficient for that contract to be actionable; this is def the case in England&Wales (and Scotland) and USA - and I believe in most common law jurisdictions ie OZ NZ Can etc.  The general principle is don't say yes unless you are willing to be sued fr breach of contract. 

If you are worried talk to your local citizen advice bureau / consumer protection office - dunno what they are called in Oz but they will exist.
 

Offline CliffordK

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Business Laws and Your Billing?
« Reply #2 on: 15/10/2011 09:46:37 »
Consider the costs and benefits carefully.

A few years ago I signed up for an "introductory offer" for cable internet.  Yet, I never received the introductory discounts.  I called in several times and was told that it would be fixed.  When I waited for the next billing cycle, it wasn't. 

As soon as the minimum contract period ended, I dropped the company, never to return.

Right now, my cell phone company is wanting to terminate my month-to-month plan I've had for the last 4 years or so.  And, the new plan they are offering costs more with less service.  You can imagine how popular that is with me.  I think, though, that I may have figured out how to get around that.
 

Offline Geezer

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Business Laws and Your Billing?
« Reply #3 on: 15/10/2011 16:32:02 »
I think, though, that I may have figured out how to get around that.

You could do what I do. Use a pre-paid sevice and buy 1000 minutes (for $100) that last a year, and any that I don't use roll-over into the next year. It costs me less that $9 a month  :D

Of course, I can't surf the web on my phone, and I refuse to text, so all I need is a phone!
 

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Business Laws and Your Billing?
« Reply #3 on: 15/10/2011 16:32:02 »

 

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